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High Carb Diet Reverse Diabetes

Low-fat, High-carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance

Low-fat, High-carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance

Low-Fat, High-Carb Diets Reverse Insulin Resistance Editor-at-Large George Lundberg, MD, reviews studies suggesting that the diet advice typically given to patients with diabetes is wrong. by George Lundberg, MD George Lundberg, MD, Editor-at-Large, MedPage Today Hello and welcome. I'm Dr. George Lundberg, speaking for myself and for my co-author Laurie Endicott Thomas, and this is At Large at MedPage Today. Physicians and other healthcare professionals often tell their patients with type 2 diabetes to avoid eating too much starch and sugar in order to keep their blood sugar from going too high. But if the patients follow that advice, they'll end up eating more fat and more protein, which could increase their risk of cardiovascular and renal complications . Worse yet, a high fat intake may actually keep the patients diabetic. It was clear by the early 20th century that diets that include a lot of fat result in impaired glucose tolerance whereas starchy, low-fat diets restore the ability to tolerate glucose . Thus, the low-carbohydrate diet that many patients with type 2 diabetes are told to eat could actually be contributing to their diabetes. A randomized clinical trial published in 2006 showed that a low-fat diet with carbohydrates based entirely on unrefined plant foods providing 75% of calories outperformed the American Diabetes Association's standard dietary recommendations for people with type 2 diabetes. The subjects assigned to the high-carbohydrate diet lost more weight, had better laboratory values (including lower HbA1c and LDL cholesterol), and were more likely to be able to discontinue taking at least one of their prescription medications. They were also more likely to stick to their diet. Although their food choices were restricted (they could eat nothing Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Do you have type 2 diabetes, or are you at risk for diabetes? Do you worry about your blood sugar? Then you’ve come to the right place. The disease diabetes (any type) means that you have too much sugar in your blood. This page will show you how to best check this. You can normalize your blood sugar naturally as needed – without pills, calorie counting or hunger. Many people have already done so. As a bonus, a normalized blood sugar usually makes you healthier and leaner. Table of contents: A disastrous epidemic Two types of diabetes Normalize your blood sugar Become your own evidence A disastrous epidemic What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic? In the past, before our modern Western diet, diabetes was extremely rare. The disease is now becoming more and more common. Around the world, more and more people are becoming diabetic: The number of people with diabetes is increasing incredibly rapidly and is heading towards 500 million. This is a world epidemic. Will someone in your family be affected next? Your mother, father, cousin, your child? Or you? Is perhaps your blood already too sweet? Those affected by the most common form of diabetes (type 2) normally never regain their health. Instead, we take for granted that they’ll become a little sicker for every year that goes by. With time they need more and more drugs. Yet, sooner or later complications emerge. Blindness. Dialysis due to faulty kidneys. Dementia. Amputations. Death. Diabetes epidemic causes inconceivable suffering. Fortunately, there’s something that can be done. We just need to see through the mistake that has led to the explosion of disease – and correct it. This can normalize your blood sugar. Many have already succeeded in doing this. If you already know that you are diabe Continue reading >>

How Atkins Can Stop Or Reverse Diabetes

How Atkins Can Stop Or Reverse Diabetes

Numerous studies in a variety of settings show dramatic improvements in blood glucose control and blood lipids in type 2 diabetics consuming a low-carb diet.(1–5). When these studies included a low-fat, high-carb comparison group, the low-carb diet consistently showed superior effects on blood glucose control, medication reduction, blood lipids and weight loss. Weight loss is particularly important because treatment goals for patients with type 2 diabetes always emphasize weight loss if the individual is overweight, yet the drugs used to treat diabetics can increase the risk of weight gain. Unlike medications, a low-carb dietary approach to type 2 diabetes can deliver improved blood sugar control and weight loss. Weight Gain as a Side Effect On its surface, the management of type 2 diabetes seems pretty easy: just get your blood glucose back down into the normal range. But insulin resistance characterizes type 2 diabetes; put simply, the glucose level “doesn’t want” to go down. This means that the body is less responsive to the most powerful drug used to treat it: insulin. So the dose of insulin that most type 2 diabetics are prescribed is sometimes very high. Moreover, because insulin not only drives glucose into muscle cells but also accelerates fat synthesis and storage, weight gain is usually one side effect of aggressive insulin therapy.(6) Other pills and injected medications have been developed to reduce this effect, but on average, the harder one tries to control blood glucose, the greater the tendency to weight gain.(7) Hypoglycemia as a Side Effect The other major side effect of attempting to gain tight control of blood sugar with medication is driving it too low, resulting in hypoglycemia, which causes weakness, shakiness and confusion. If these sympt Continue reading >>

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetes | Carbs That Are Good For You

Reversing Diabetes | Carbs That Are Good For You

Do you have type 2 diabetes? Have you been told you have to give up juicy watermelon or sweet grapes? What if we told you those foods really aren’t taboo? Learn how participants at the Pritikin Longevity Center have success with their blood sugars… even while enjoying fruit! For people who need to watch their blood sugar, a high-carbohydrate diet is actually good for you. What’s critical is the type of carbohydrate. Certainly, if you’re eating refined carbs like white bread and sugary desserts, blood sugar levels can shoot up. But if the bulk of your diet is fiber-rich, unprocessed carbohydrates like vegetables, whole fruit, whole grains, and beans, you may be able to normalize blood sugar levels and even reverse the diagnosis of pre-diabetes and diabetes, scientists are now discovering. An investigation conducted by UCLA researchers followed diabetic men at the Pritikin Longevity Center for three weeks. It reported that the Pritikin Eating Plan, high in whole, fiber-filled carbohydrates, plus daily exercise, not only helped the men lose weight and improve cholesterol levels, it also decreased blood sugar levels by 20% and insulin levels by 30%.1 Reversing Diabetes What’s more, by the end of their three-week program, the majority of the men had controlled their fasting blood glucose, or blood sugar, so well that “they were no longer classified as diabetic,” wrote lead investigators Drs. James Barnard and Christian Roberts of UCLA. Some of the men left Pritikin completely free of their diabetic medications, and others had their medication dosages reduced. In addition to normalizing blood sugar and reducing classic heart disease risk factors like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, the Pritikin Program of diet and exercise also substantially improved r Continue reading >>

Low Carb Or High Carb?

Low Carb Or High Carb?

It seems like a pretty simple question, but alas, it is not.  The American Diabetes Association (ADA) admits that low carbohydrate diets would help patients manage their blood sugars, but the organization still recommends a high carbohydrate dietary approach.  Why? According to Regina Wilshire, science writer, the ADA feels that low carb diets are too difficult for people to follow.  This is obvious if you pick up any diabetes publication off the supermarket shelf.  Most of them have a picture of a chocolate cake or plate of cookies right on the front cover.  The over-riding position is that patients can’t or won’t do it, so we shouldn’t deprive them unnecessarily.  There are new drugs and medications approved and many more in the pipeline to control blood sugar, so why ask people to give up their favorite foods?  This type of thinking, of course, is dangerous and narrow-minded.    And, it’s led us to the position of having a run away train destroying the health of our country and the developed world.  Diabetes is beyond epidemic already, and it’s predicted to triple in the next 35 years.  Other so-called experts tell patients that low carb diets can even be dangerous.  That if they don’t get enough carbs, their brain will starve, that it will put them in a state of keto-acidosis, or that too much protein will destroy their kidneys.  None of this is true.  “Carbohydrates, whether derived from gluten-containing foods or other sources, including fruit, sweetened beverages, and starchy vegetables, are dangerous as they relate to brain health in and of themselves” – David Perlmutter The Nurses Health Study, a large study conducted using over 1600 nurses found that a high protein diet was not dangerous or harmful in women with normal kidney f Continue reading >>

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

Healthy Carbs For Diabetes

1 / 9 Making the Best Carb Choices for Diabetes "When you say 'carbohydrate,' most people think of sugar," says Meredith Nguyen, RD, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator at the Methodist Charlton Medical Center Diabetes Self-Management Program in Dallas. But that's only half the story. Carbohydrates are also starches and valuable fiber, which are found in many nutrient-rich foods that should be part of a diabetes diet. Sugar is the basic building block that, depending on how it's organized, creates either starches or fiber. You need about 135 grams of carbohydrates every day, spread fairly evenly throughout your meals. Instead of trying to avoid carbs completely, practice planning your diabetes diet with everything in moderation. "There's nothing you can't have," Nguyen says. "The catch is that you might not like the portion size or frequency." Use this list of healthy carbohydrates to help you stay balanced. Continue reading >>

The High-carbohydrate Diet In Diabetes Management.

The High-carbohydrate Diet In Diabetes Management.

The high-carbohydrate diet in diabetes management. In summary, the best diet for an insulin-requiring diabetic person is a diet thatcan be best integrated into the person's lifestyle, one that is best matched toan insulin regimen acceptable to that person, and one that leads to the bestcontrol of the 24-hour integrated blood glucose concentration. Should futureresearch indicate that a very high-CHO, low-fat diet is of additional benefit to the patient, then the dietary recommendations to the patient should be alteredaccordingly. It should be understood that diabetes is a chronic disease thatrequires intensive effort by the patient if reasonable management is to beattained. We should not complicate this management unnecessarily by dietaryintervention unless clear benefits can be observed. For the type II,noninsulin-requiring diabetic person, dietary recommendations are even lesscertain. Obese patients should be encouraged to lose weight and to maintain amore ideal body weight, but one should not be disappointed if the patient isunable to accomplish this. Medical indications for weight loss rarely have beensufficient motivation for patients to remain on a semistarvation diet. Shouldsafe, effective anorexigenic drugs become available, they clearly would be thetreatment of choice for these patients. The best weight-maintenance diet for typeII diabetic persons remains to be determined. A high-CHO, low-fat diet wouldappear to be best, provided it results in a more normal average level of bloodglucose. An increase in dietary soluble fiber also may be useful in reducing the serum cholesterol concentration. In such a diet, those CHO foods that raise thepostprandial glucose concentration the least should be emphasized. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Low Carb Vs. High Carb - My Surprising 24-day Diabetes Diet Battle

Twitter summary: What I learned from doubling my carb intake: the same average blood sugar, but four times as much hypoglycemia, more work, stress, & danger. As a teenager, I ate a high carb diet that included lots of Goldfish crackers, white sandwich bread, pasta, and white potatoes. It was tasty, but it put my blood sugars on a wild roller coaster every single day. Things turned around in college when I learned about nutrition, got on CGM, and spent time with health conscious friends. I soon realized that eating less than 30 grams of carbs at one time was a complete gamechanger. I’ve stuck with that approach ever since. But is this lower carb method actually better for my blood sugars, or have I just been fooling myself? To find out, I took on a somewhat terrifying self-tracking experiment: 12 days of my usual, lower-carb diet, which averaged 146 grams of carbs per day (21% of daily calories). My carbs were primarily from nuts, seeds, vegetables, and a bit of fruit. 12 days of a higher-carb, high whole-grain diet, which averaged 313 grams of carbs per day (43% of my daily calories). My sources of carbs were NOT junk food: plain oatmeal, whole wheat bread, quinoa, wild rice, and fruit. Neither of these was unrealistic. My lower-carb diet was nowhere near Atkins level (20 grams per day), and the higher-carb diet was consistent with the “average” 45% carb diet in people with diabetes (according to ADA). Even though this was a one-person (n=1) experiment, I wanted to be as scientific and fair as possible: eating whole, unprocessed foods in both periods; counting and tracking every single gram of carbohydrate (LoseIt! app); wearing CGM 24/7 and downloading the glucose data to document what happened (Dexcom G5 and Clarity); taking insulin before meals (5-15 minutes pr Continue reading >>

Why I Recommend A High-carb Diet For My Patients With Diabetes

Why I Recommend A High-carb Diet For My Patients With Diabetes

Why I Recommend a High-Carb Diet for My Patients with Diabetes Michelle McMacken, MD, is a board-certified internal medicine physician and an assistant professor of medicine at NYU School of Medicine. An honors graduate of Yale University and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, she has more than ten years of experience practicing primary care,directing a medical weight-loss program, and teaching doctors-in-training at Bellevue Hospital Center in NYC. An enthusiastic supporter of plant-based nutrition, she is committed to educating patients, medical students, and doctors about the power of healthy eating and lifestyle modification. From a Failing Heart and Weight Struggles to Healthy and Active: A Couples Plant-Based Journey I have many patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in my internal medicine practice. When I ask what foods they think they should limit, the majority answer carbs. To their surprise, I tell them that I actually recommend a high-carb dietone based in whole- or minimally processed plant foods. Heres why: People eating high-carb, high-fiber diets enjoy exceptional protection from type 2 diabetes. The Adventist Health Study 2 showed that among nearly 61,000 people, veganswhose diets are typically high in carbohydrate-rich foodshad half the rate of diabetes compared to non-vegetarians, even after accounting for differences in body weight. It is notable that the non-vegetarians in this study ate red meat and poultry relatively infrequently, suggesting that even small increases in meat consumption disproportionately increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Other studies from the Adventist group show similar trends. Among 41,387 Adventists followed for two years, vegans had a 62 percent lower risk of developing diabetes compared to o Continue reading >>

How You Reverse Insulin Resistance (and Diabetes) Rapidly With A Low-fat, High Carb Diet - An Interview With Type 1 Diabetic, Cyrus Khambatta, Phd (nutritional Biochemistry)

How You Reverse Insulin Resistance (and Diabetes) Rapidly With A Low-fat, High Carb Diet - An Interview With Type 1 Diabetic, Cyrus Khambatta, Phd (nutritional Biochemistry)

How You Reverse Insulin Resistance (and Diabetes) Rapidly with A Low-Fat, Plant-Based Diet (39:40 min) Kirk's video overview with Dr. Khambatta of their interview (5:33 min) Dr. Khambatta’s Personal “Mastering Diabetes” Story Dr. Khambatta was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 22 during his senior year in college while a mechanical engineering student at Stanford University. He had been an athlete all his life playing all types of sports. He was told upon his diagnoses to start counting and reduce his carbohydrate intake, and, to take insulin. He was given the standard advise that if he reduced his carbohydrate intake he would need less insulin and control his blood sugar better. That first year he cut his carbohydrates down to 100-120 grams per day and he ate more protein rich and fatty foods. With this approach he felt terrible, lost his energy, and his blood sugar was uncontrollable. He had no idea how to control his blood glucose. The carbohydrates he consumed were processed, fat and sugar laden carbs, with little non-starchy carbohydrate or “good” low glycemic, carbohydrates like beans, lentils, peas, etc.. He had more protein, dairy products and fat in this dietary approach. He could not control his blood glucose with any predictable use of his insulin. He had to make continued adjustments, and frequently, there would be hypoglycemic episodes as well as elevated blood sugar levels. His “ah ha” moment came after playing soccer on day and he felt terrible and his blood sugar was 285. He “threw” his glucose meter against the wall and cried in despair. He had a realization that food was the problem and decided with conviction that he had to learn how to eat and learn about nutrition. He read books about low carb, high protein diets, but th Continue reading >>

My High-carb, Low-fat Experiment With Type 1 Diabetes

My High-carb, Low-fat Experiment With Type 1 Diabetes

My High-Carb, Low-Fat Experiment with Type 1 Diabetes This is a detailed article about what happened when I tried to experiment with a low-fat, high-carb diet lead by Cyrus Khambatta from Mastering Diabetes for ultimate sensitivity to insulin. This is a lengthy post because I want to do the experience justice. I also want to give enough detail to give proper credit and acknowledgment to those who do enjoy and thrive while eating a high-carb, low-fat, plant-based diet. But by Day 9 of this experiment, Ive realized Im not one of those people. My usual over the past few years has varied between a low-carb diet (50 grams or less of carbs) or a lower-than-average carb diet (100 grams or less). And sprinkled in there are also indulgences like gluten-free pizza or the incredible gluten-free chocolate cake I made for my twin brother when he came to visit or gluten-free Christmas cookies. (Yup, diabetics can eat cookies! ) My point is: I save my carbs for the good stuff: pizza night, burger night, and occasional homemade desserts. Pizza night is probably 3x a month. Burger night is far more rare, 1x a month at most. Ive managed to keep my A1C between 5.5 and 6.5 with this flexible approach to eating mostly whole foods, mostly low-carb, and saving room in my carb budget for the carbs that I enjoy the most. This also makes blood sugar management around those treats easier because your low-carb choices all day required very little effort and insulin/carb juggling. You can also keep your carb intake still relatively low if youre just indulging once per day (or once per week, etc., your choice), so youre preventing any feeling of deprivation but still eating a mostly lower carb diet. I was also a big fan of intermittent fasting prior to this experiment, and I continued to do 16-hour Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes While Eating A High-carbohydrate Diet

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes While Eating A High-carbohydrate Diet

How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes While Eating a High-Carbohydrate Diet When Joaquin was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he decided immediately that it was time to take his health seriously. Although he was determined to make changes, he never expected that he would lose 45 pounds and learn how to reverse type 2 diabetes completely. Reversing Type 2 Diabetes = Reversing Insulin Resistance Joaquin was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes on May 26, 2017. Shortly after his diagnosis, Joaquin began searching for credible information about how to manage type 2 diabetes, and soon learned that an even better question would be to ask how to reverse type 2 diabetes. His initial research taught him that in order to do this, he would first need to reverse the root cause of type 2 diabetes: insulin resistance. He attended local diabetes education classes, which left him frustrated when they didnt talk at all about insulin resistance. He then found a video by Cyrus Khambatta, PhD talking about reversing insulin resistance using low-fat, plant-based, whole-food nutrition. Joaquin learned how to reverse type 2 diabetes by eating more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. Thats when things got exciting. Joaquin was excited to find out that he could eat some of his favorite foods in abundance, including fruit , potatoes , and his beloved childhood staple, rice and beans. He learned that while refined carbohydrates like white sugar or white bread can promote insulin resistance (especially when paired with high fat ingredients, as in the case of cookies, doughnuts, and pastries), carbohydrates consumed in their whole, unprocessed form help to reverse it. Seeking guidance on how to get started, Joaquin signed up for the July 2017 Mastering Diabetes Retreat in Idyllwild, CA. He spent 4 da Continue reading >>

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

A Guide To Healthy Low-carb Eating With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions. It currently affects over 400 million people worldwide (1). Although diabetes is a complicated disease, maintaining good blood sugar control can greatly reduce the risk of complications (2, 3). One of the ways to achieve better blood sugar levels is to follow a low-carb diet. This article provides a detailed overview of low-carb diets for managing diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body cannot process carbohydrates effectively. Normally, when you eat carbs, they are broken down into small units of glucose, which end up as blood sugar. When blood sugar levels go up, the pancreas responds by producing the hormone insulin. This hormone allows the blood sugar to enter cells. In healthy people, blood sugar levels remain within a narrow range throughout the day. In diabetes, however, this system doesn't work the way it is supposed to. This is a big problem, because having both too high and too low blood sugar levels can cause severe harm. There are several types of diabetes, but the two most common ones are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both of these conditions can be diagnosed at any age. In type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune process destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Diabetics must inject insulin several times a day to ensure that glucose gets into the cells and stays at a healthy level in the bloodstream (4). In type 2 diabetes, the beta cells at first produce enough insulin, but the body's cells are resistant to its action, so blood sugar remains high. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down. Over time, the beta cells lose their ability to produce enough insulin (5). Of the three nutrients -- protein, carbs and fat -- carbs have the grea Continue reading >>

High-carb Diet Reverses Diabetes: Peer-reviewed Journal Article In The Lancet

High-carb Diet Reverses Diabetes: Peer-reviewed Journal Article In The Lancet

High-Carb Diet Reverses Diabetes: Peer-Reviewed Journal Article in The Lancet November 2, 2015By Robby Barbaro Scientific Studies In the video below I review a 1955 scientific study in The Lancet, a world-renowned medical journal, in which 68 of 80 people reversed type 2 diabetes on a low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. In the study, entitled Low-Fat Diet and Therapeutic Doses of Insulin in Diabetes Mellitus, all 80 participants started out taking 30 to 120 units of insulin to manage their diabetes. (Its important to note that this study is so old that it didnt differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetesa distinction that came along in the 1970s.) The plan was to stick with a diet consisting of roughly 60% of calories from carbohydrates, 28% from protein, and 12% from fat (the exact foods consumed were not documented) and slowly reduce their intake of insulin according to a formula. Urine testing was used to monitor their blood sugars (remember, in 1955 blood sugar meters hadnt yet been invented). 10 patients became sugar-free (no sugar in their urine) within 7 days on diet alone, meaning their blood sugars returned to normal without having to slowly reduce their insulin over the course of the study. 50 patients reversed their diabetes in in 3 to 6 weeks. In all, 68 of the 80 patients (85%) became free of insulin and essentially reversed their diabetes. What about the remaining 12 patients? All of them experienced a dramatic reduction in their insulin requirements. We should also note that for all we know, several of them could have been type 1 diabetics. Lets put this in perspective: 80 people who were taking insulin to treat their diabetes started following a high-carbohydrate diet. Over a period of 1 week to 5 months, 85% of them reversed their diabetes and stoppe Continue reading >>

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