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High Blood Sugar Sore Throat

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

What Kind Of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / what kind of cold medicine can diabetics take article What Kind of Cold Medicine Can Diabetics Take? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. My mother just found out she has diabetes. What can she take for a cough or cold, since most of the medicines have a lot of sugar? There are a few things I'd like to mention before I get straight to your answer. Ifyour mother's cough is accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever , chills , sore throat , or other systemic symptoms, she should be assessed by a physician. Likewise, is she is coughing up phlegm (sputum) that is thick, green, otherwise has color, or is excessive in amount, she should be seen by a doctor. In addition, if she identifies triggers, such as dander, or pollen , this may be more than a simple cough , and should be investigated. Finally, it is common sense that she and anyone with diabetes (or without diabetes , for that matter) should not smoke. There are over-the-counter remedies available without sugar , and if in doubt, your pharmacist should be able to point you in the right direction. In particular, Benylin Adult is sugar and alcohol free, and provides some relief from a non-productive (dry) cough. This should not be used in conjunction with MAOIs , in pregnancy or in nursing mothers. The active ingredient inthis formula is Dextromethorphan, and it is PPA (phenylpropanolamine) free. Another possibilityis Robitussin CF. This preparation has been re-formulate Continue reading >>

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Cold Medicines That Are Safe For Diabetes

Searching for relief for your runny nose, sore throat, or cough? Many over-the-counter cough, cold, and flu remedies list diabetes as an underlying condition that may indicate you should leave the medication on the shelf. The warnings are clear: "Ask a doctor before use if you have: heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes." Unfortunately, your doctor is not along for the trip to the pharmacy. Because illness causes your body to release stress hormones that naturally raise blood glucose, you'll want to be sure that over-the-counter medications won't increase blood glucose levels, too. Simple Is Best for Cold Medicines Keep it simple by choosing an over-the-counter medication based on the types of ingredients proven to relieve your particular symptoms. Often a medication with just one ingredient is all you need to treat your symptoms rather than agents with multiple ingredients. "To choose the correct medication, take time to speak to a pharmacist," says Jerry Meece, R.Ph., CDE, of Gainesville, Texas. "The proper remedies may not only make you feel better, but also cut the length of the illness and possibly save you a trip to the doctor." Oral cold and flu pills are often a better choice than syrups with the same ingredients because the pills may contain no carbohydrate. If you decide to use a syrup, look for one that is sugar-free. If you can't find one, the small amount of sugar in a syrup will likely affect your blood sugar less than the illness itself, Meece says. Safe OTC Cold Medicines Various over-the-counter medications are designed to treat specific symptoms. Many pharmacists recommend these products for people with diabetes. Symptom: Cough Best option: Anti-tussive dextromethorphan (Delsym, Diabetic Tussin NT [includes acetaminophen, diphenhydramine]) Sympt Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia is a hallmark sign of diabetes (both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes) and prediabetes. Other conditions that can cause hyperglycemia are pancreatitis, Cushing's syndrome, unusual hormone-secreting tumors, pancreatic cancer, certain medications, and severe illnesses. The main symptoms of hyperglycemia are increased thirst and a frequent need to urinate. Severely elevated glucose levels can result in a medical emergency like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS, also referred to as hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state). Insulin is the treatment of choice for people with type 1 diabetes and for life-threatening increases in glucose levels. People with type 2 diabetes may be managed with a combination of different oral and injectable medications. Hyperglycemia due to medical conditions other than diabetes is generally treated by treating the underlying condition responsible for the elevated glucose. Blood Sugar Swings: Tips for Managing Diabetes & Glucose Levels A number of medical conditions can cause hyperglycemia, but the most common by far is diabetes mellitus. Diabetes affects over 8% of the total U.S. population. In diabetes, blood glucose levels rise either because there is an insufficient amount of insulin in the body or the body cannot use insulin well. Normally, the pancreas releases insulin after a meal so that the cells of the body can utilize glucose for fuel. This keeps blood glucose levels in the normal range. Type 1 diabetes is responsible for about 5% of all cases of diabetes and results from damage to the insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes is far more common and is related to the body's inability to effectively use insulin. In addition to type 1 and type 2, gestational diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Infection: How To Spot The Signs

Diabetes And Infection: How To Spot The Signs

Diabetes can slow down your body's ability to fight infection. The high sugar levels in your blood and tissues allow bacteria to grow and help infections develop more quickly. Common sites for these problems are your bladder, kidneys, vagina, gums, feet, and skin. Early treatment can prevent more serious issues later on. What to Look For Most infections in people with diabetes can be treated. But you have to be able to spot the symptoms. Tell your doctor immediately if you have any of the following: Fever over 101 F Pain, tenderness, redness, or swelling Wound or cut that won't heal Red, warm, or draining sore Sore throat, scratchy throat, or pain when you swallow Sinus drainage, nasal congestion, headaches, or tenderness along upper cheekbones White patches in your mouth or on your tongue Flu-like symptoms (chills, aches, headache, or fatigue) or generally feeling "lousy" Painful or frequent peeing or a constant urge to go Bloody, cloudy, or foul-smelling pee *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) happens when your blood sugar is high and your insulin level is low. This imbalance in the body causes a build-up of ketones. Ketones are toxic. If DKA isn’t treated, it can lead to diabetic coma and even death. DKA mainly affects people who have type 1 diabetes. But it can also happen with other types of diabetes, including type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes (during pregnancy). DKA is a very serious condition. If you have diabetes and think you may have DKA, contact your doctor or get to a hospital right away. The first symptoms to appear are usually: frequent urination. The next stage of DKA symptoms include: vomiting (usually more than once) confusion or trouble concentrating a fruity odor on the breath. The main cause of DKA is not enough insulin. A lack of insulin means sugar can’t get into your cells. Your cells need sugar for energy. This causes your body’s glucose levels to rise. To get energy, the body starts to burn fat. This process causes ketones to build up. Ketones can poison the body. High blood glucose levels can also cause you to urinate often. This leads to a lack of fluids in the body (dehydration). DKA can be caused by missing an insulin dose, eating poorly, or feeling stressed. An infection or other illness (such as pneumonia or a urinary tract infection) can also lead to DKA. If you have signs of infection (fever, cough, or sore throat), contact your doctor. You will want to make sure you are getting the right treatment. For some people, DKA may be the first sign that they have diabetes. When you are sick, you need to watch your blood sugar level very closely so that it doesn’t get too high or too low. Ask your doctor what your critical blood sugar level is. Most patients should watch their glucose levels c Continue reading >>

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

Cold, Flu And Other Infections

It is a good idea to develop an action plan in anticipation of sick days, with your healthcare team. An acute disease almost always raises blood glucose (sugar) levels because of: the secretion of stress hormones (also known as counterregulatory hormones: primarily cortisol, adrenaline and glucagon), which have an insulin-antagonistic effect; less regular exercise, which makes the injected insulin less effective, even if the amount of food consumed is reduced. Sick days on insulin The daily insulin needs of people with diabetes often rise when they get sick. Consequently, even though diabetics may eat less when ill, they still need to take their regular insulin doses as prescribed, or adjusted, by their doctors. Advice and adjustments Take your blood glucose (sugar) readings more often: every 2-4 hours, or more often if necessary. Take your insulin or diabetes medication as usual, unless advised otherwise by your doctor. Take your temperature: if needed, take acetaminophen to lower your temperature and prevent dehydration through sweating caused by fever. If you have type 1 diabetes: if your blood glucose (sugar) is above 14.0 mmol/L, measure the ketones in your blood or urine every 2 to 4 hours, or more often if necessary. Diet: If you lose your appetite, drink liquid or semi-liquid sources of carbohydrates (fruit sauces, yogurt, etc.) at the rate of 15 g of carbohydrates per hour if you have taken the proper insulin doses. Hydration: If your blood glucose (sugar) level is high: Drink lots of unsweetened liquids (sparkling water, diet soft drinks, bouillon, etc.) to avoid becoming dehydrated, at the rate of 250 ml every hour. If your blood glucose (sugar) levels tend to fall: Have small amounts at a time of sweetened foods (fruit juice, regular Jell-OTM, milk, etc.). S Continue reading >>

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Can Infection Raise Blood Sugar Levels In Nondiabetics?

Even if you do not have diabetes, you can experience drops and spikes in blood sugar levels for many reasons. If your blood sugar level gets too high or too low, you might develop many symptoms and/or health problems. Stress, poor diet, illness and infections can all cause your blood sugar level to change, and if you notice the warning signs, it is important to talk to your physician about the best treatment approach. Video of the Day After a meal, your body breaks food down into glucose either for immediate use, or else it's stored for later use. The hormone insulin, as well as other chemicals, regulate how much glucose is in your system. If the level of glucose in your bloodstream gets too high, many complications can result. A general goal for everyone is to keep your blood sugar levels no higher than 100 mg/dL, says MedlinePlus. A blood sugar level higher than this can indicate not just diabetes, but also some forms of cancer, Cushing syndrome, an imbalance of various hormones, thyroid disorders or it might be the body's reaction to stress, trauma or an infection. Infections and Blood Glucose Levels When your body is under mental or physical stress, such as when fighting off an infection, hormones such as cortisol are released to help your body cope. The hormones that are released to fight off the infection might have the side effect of raising your blood sugar levels, so your body has the energy it needs to get better. This effect can happen to both diabetics and nondiabetics. If you have an infection and are concerned about your blood sugar levels, it is important to know the warning signs of nondiabetic hyperglycemia, which are the same symptoms that occur in diabetics: hunger, sweating, shakiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, thirst, sleepiness, confusion, diffic Continue reading >>

Strep Throat/high Bgs

Strep Throat/high Bgs

I am on antibiotics, I am drinking tons of tea and water but no exercise, feel so lousy stuck in be, my numbers will not move past 191!!! No matter how much insulin I have taken! All I have eaten is a few hard boiled eggs and chicken broth today! Any suggestions on how to bring these numbers down? Any and all responses are greatly appreciated, I feel awful D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 I am on antibiotics, I am drinking tons of tea and water but no exercise, feel so lousy stuck in be, my numbers will not move past 191!!! No matter how much insulin I have taken! All I have eaten is a few hard boiled eggs and chicken broth today! Any suggestions on how to bring these numbers down? Any and all responses are greatly appreciated, I feel awful Well, infections commonly cause elevated blood sugars. Your body naturally raises your levels to give you energy to fight the infection. Some antibiotics can also cause elevated blood sugars. Your blood sugar is high, but by no means dangerously high. I would recommend that you just not worrry about it too much. Monitor your blood sugar and if it does not go down within a day or so of starting your antibiotic course, then check with your doctor. If it goes higher, then you might be concerned. Thank you for responding, went to bed early last night, I take Levemire and Novolog, I only increased the novolog yesterday, I took 8 units throughout the day with barely any food, i usually take 3-4 a day (1:15) this morning I woke up and was 197, took my Usual Levemire and 3 units novolog to correct and my antibiotic is Augmenten (sp?) Barely have eaten today except for chicken broth and sugar free jello (throat so sore) I am finally at 127. Still not great but I will take it. I was very scared so thank you so much for your help Continue reading >>

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Handling Diabetes When You're Sick

Whether your head feels like it's stuffed with cotton because you have a cold or you're spending a lot of time on the toilet because of a stomach bug, being sick is no fun for anyone. For people with diabetes, being sick can also affect blood sugar levels. The good news is that taking a few extra precautions can help you keep your blood sugar levels under control. When you get sick whether it's a minor illness like a sore throat or cold or a bigger problem like dehydration or surgery the body perceives the illness as stress. To relieve the stress, the body fights the illness. This process requires more energy than the body normally uses. On one hand, this is good because it helps supply the extra fuel the body needs. On the other hand, in a person with diabetes, this can lead to high blood sugar levels. Some illnesses cause the opposite problem, though. If you don't feel like eating or have nausea or vomiting, and you're taking the same amount of insulin you normally do, you can develop blood sugar levels that are too low. Blood sugar levels can be very unpredictable when you're sick. Because you can't be sure how the illness will affect your blood sugar levels, it's important to check blood sugar levels often on sick days and adjust your insulin doses as needed. Your diabetes management plan will help you know what to do when you're sick. The plan might tell you: how to monitor your blood glucose levels and ketones when you're sick what changes you might make to your food and drink and diabetes medications In addition, people with diabetes should get the pneumococcal vaccine, which protects against some serious infections. You should also get a flu shot every year. These vaccines may help you keep your diabetes under better control and cut down on the number of sick d Continue reading >>

Sugar And Sore Throats: What Is The Link?

Sugar And Sore Throats: What Is The Link?

Sugar And Sore Throats: What is the Link? Sounds familiar? You just had your last bite of a sugar-rich delicacy and suddenly you feel a sore throat coming up. But what is the link? Medical experts will dive deeper into the effects of sugar on your body and give advice on how to beat that sore throat. Sugar is a super acidic food that causes havoc with the bodys acid base balance. Any form of sugar can tip the scales in sensitive individuals, but the worst kind comes in the form of refined white sugar and hidden sugars in cakes, biscuits, puddings and sweets. The body tends to self-regulate its acid/alkaline levels with the help of alkalinising foods. However, our diet generally consists of foods that leave an acid residue. Pathogens (infectious agents) love an acid environment and thrive on such imbalances in the body. Because acidity causes inflammation, individuals with a tendency toward over-acidity are prone to all kinds of related conditions, such as skin irritations, joint aches and pains and so on. And yes, you may well have an underlying infection. Bear in mind that sugar also compromises immune function, which may be another reason for your reaction. According to Jim Howenstine, M.D., humans are not able to turn sugar into vitamin C as other animals can. Glucose and ascorbic acid compete with one another. So a diet high in sugar means lower levels of vitamin C. Overall, the immune system is weakened by this scenario. Also people with diabetes can have highly variable insulin levels from a simple cold, and eating lots of sugar could worsen the situation. Start correcting the acid/base balance in your body with calcium-rich and alkalinising foods such as sprouts, sesame seeds, tahini and green leafy vegetables. Begin your day with a tall glass of water and a sli Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic With Recurring Sore Throat

Type 1 Diabetic With Recurring Sore Throat

Type 1 Diabetic with recurring sore throat I am a type 1 diabetic. I am on an insulin pump. I am 25 years old and I have been a [diagnosed] diabetic for 10 years. I have been on my pump for 2 years. I am worried becuase I have a recurring sore throat. I do not have tonsils. I had them removed when I was 17. I went to the doctor and the strep test was negative. I was given 10 days of amoxicillin. It has been 1 week since I finished my antibiotics... The top/back of my throat is beginnig to swell again. It is extremely dry! It is hard to swallow. The corners of my mouth are cracked/splitting. I am not that hungry, which is not good for a type 1 who needs to eat! I am also really tired and have horrible night sweats to where I have to get up and change my pajamas and the bed sheets. My blood glucose has been a little high, too. I think my body is trying to fight off something, but I don't know what???? I am going back to the doctor soon, but I DO NOT want to hear, "It's just a virus." Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Strep Throat And Blood Sugar

Strep Throat And Blood Sugar

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have severe strep throat for past two days and the blood sugar has been above 200 after two hours of eating, usually they are around 120. Doing some primary search on internet says that blood sugar can be high during infection. I want to hear from firsthand experiences, especially with strep throats. Ohh yeah. An infection for me makes HIGH blood sugar a certainty. 200-300 easily. Throat, ear, sinus, teeth, you name it. Not sure if I ever had sterp throat, but in 20 years of T1 and a meter, I always go high with an infection. Thats how I know, for sure, when to go to the doctor! Whenever you have any type of infection your immune system will kick in extra glucose from your liver to help you heal quicker. This extra glucose will play havoc with your bgs. Sometimes the antibiotics also play havoc with my bgs. I had a sinus infection a few years ago and saw bgs in that 200-300 range and they freaked me out. maybe i was in infection, i have coughed for like 2 months when i did the first fasting test. after a while, it dropped down below 100 everyday. So then what's the right approach to bring the BGs down while in infection? Eat less? Exercising more doesn't have a noticeable impact on BGs. Starting medication would release more insulin and bring the sugar down, which is now interfering body's fighting mechanism against infection - which will release more sugar? Kind of a see-saw effect. What's the general approach and expert opinion on this? Thanks! So then what's the right approach to bring the BGs down while in infection? Eat less? Exercising more doesn't have a noticeable impact on BGs. Sta Continue reading >>

Can A Dry Throat Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

Can A Dry Throat Be A Sign Of Diabetes?

Your throat feels parched and scratchy and your breath is stale. While you may dismiss this as not drinking enough water or coming down with a cold, if you experience a chronic dry throat, diabetes may be to blame. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes is a chronic condition that raises your blood sugar levels leading to symptoms such as thirst and dry mouth. If you are diagnosed with this disease, rest assured that it is common and manageable. The American Diabetes Association notes that nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes. Dry Throat A dry throat can feel like someone has sandpapered the lining of your throat. Your throat might feel itchy and even sore. The dry, rough feeling may also occur in your mouth and on your tongue. There are many causes of a dry throat including being dehydrated, excessive exercise, habitually sleeping or breathing with an open mouth and an infection. If your dry throat persists no matter how much water you drink and you also seem to urinate more than usual, you may have diabetes. Diabetes.co.uk notes that thirst, excess urination and a dry mouth are signs of diabetes. Thirst in Diabetes Diabetes occurs because your body cannot make enough or adequately use a hormone called insulin, which carries sugar from your bloodstream into your cells where it can be burned for energy. This raises your blood sugar levels, causing a domino effect on your body that leads to dehydration and thirst. Diabetes.co.uk explains that as your blood sugar levels spike, the kidneys sense an imbalance and kick into overdrive to secrete more sugar through your urine. More urination means extra water loss from your body, causing chronic thirst and a dry mouth and throat. Other Symptoms You can have a range of diabetes symptoms or none at all. If your dry throat occurs al Continue reading >>

Colds And Illness

Colds And Illness

When you are poorly with colds and illness or vomiting, you may notice a rise in blood sugar levels as your body fights to get better. The body releases extra glucose and having gestational diabetes means that you cannot create or use enough insulin to help normalise your blood sugar levels. Dehydration With higher blood sugar levels your body will cause more frequent urination to help flush out the excess glucose, this in turn can lead to dehydration. Make sure you increase fluid intake if you are poorly. How to make yourself feel better Drink plenty Try to eat little and often to maintain blood sugar levels Frequently test blood sugar levels so that you can see what's happening Take paracetamol to bring down temperatures and give pain relief Try sugar free throat lozenges for sore throats such as Halls sugar free throat sweets Try applying Vicks Vaporub on your neck for sore throats, or on the soles of your feet with colds Try drinking hot water, lemon and ginger for colds Have a warm, steamy shower or bath to clear airways For help with advice when vomiting, take a look at our hyperemesis page here. Consult a medical professional if you are concerned or symptoms persist. If you cannot keep food down then you should contact your hospital Diabetes and infections Bacteria feed from increased glucose levels and the reduced function of neutrophils (white blood cells that attack infection) in the body mean that diabetics are more susceptible to infection. Gestational diabetes also increases the susceptibility to various types of infections. The most common infections are urinary tract, yeast infections such as thrush and skin infections. If you suspect you may be suffering with any type of infection then please seek medical advice. In many cases, medication may be required Continue reading >>

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