diabetestalk.net

High Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women

Diabetes that begins during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. This condition affects 5 to 9 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, and it is becoming more common, according to a July 2009 article in "American Family Physician." Pregnancy also aggravates preexisting type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar levels that are consistently too high during pregnancy can cause problems for both mother and infant. Video of the Day Diabetes during pregnancy increases the likelihood of congenital malformations, or birth defects, in infants, particularly if your blood glucose is poorly controlled for the first 10 weeks of pregnancy. High blood sugars also contribute to excessive fetal growth, which makes labor and delivery difficult and increases the likelihood of infant fractures or nerve injuries. Large infants are more likely to be delivered via cesarean section. Newborns of diabetic mothers are at risk for respiratory distress, jaundice and dangerously low blood calcium or glucose levels. Gestational diabetes is diagnosed when your blood sugars exceed specified levels following two glucose tolerance tests. The first test, usually performed between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy, involves drinking 50 g of a sugar solution and checking your blood glucose one hour later. If your level is above 130 mg/dL, your doctor will probably order a second glucose tolerance test that measures your blood glucose when you are fasting and then each hour for 2 to 3 hours after the test. A fasting glucose higher than 95 mg/dL, a one-hour level above 180 mg/dL, a two-hour level over 155 mg/dL or a three-hour measurement over 140 mg/dL is diagnostic of gestational diabetes. For pregnant women without diabetes, average fasting glucose levels vary between 69 mg/dL and 75 mg/ Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Chart

Blood Sugar Chart

This blood sugar chart shows normal blood glucose levels before and after meals and recommended HbA1c levels for people with and without diabetes. BLOOD SUGAR CHART Fasting Normal for person without diabetes 70–99 mg/dl (3.9–5.5 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 80–130 mg/dl (4.4–7.2 mmol/L) 2 hours after meals Normal for person without diabetes Less than 140 mg/dl (7.8 mmol/L) Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes Less than 180 mg/dl (10.0 mmol/L) HbA1c Normal for person without diabetes Less than 5.7% Official ADA recommendation for someone with diabetes 7.0% or less Interested in learning more? Read about normal blood glucose numbers, getting tested for Type 2 diabetes and using blood sugar monitoring to manage diabetes. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels Chart

High Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood sugar level is the amount of glucose present in the blood. Cells in the body get energy from glucose, which is formed from the food we consume and is stored in the body. The pancreas produces the hormone insulin, which helps the cells in the body to use the glucose in order to create energy. Glucose is, thereby, transferred to every cell in the body through the bloodstream. When the body does not make insulin or the insulin fails to function properly, high blood sugar level rises in the body. Depending upon the intake of food, the level of glucose in the body can change. A high blood sugar level is termed as hyperglycemia; this condition affects people who are suffering from diabetes. Some of the symptoms of diabetes are excessive thirst, frequent urination and more craving for food. However, a fall in blood sugar level is equally dangerous and is termed hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is characterized by headaches, sweating, fatigue, and loss of consciousness at times. Sometimes, glucose may fail to enter the cells of the body adequately and stays in the blood itself. This can also lead to high blood sugar level. Persistent high blood sugar levels can lead to diseases related to the heart, kidney, and the eye. In this condition, excessive amount of glucose circulates in the bloodstream without being transferred to the body cells. This condition may not be normally noticeable until the blood glucose reach higher values. The period or the phase just before the onset of diabetes is called the prediabetes phase. In this phase, the blood sugar level is evidently high and acts as a warning signal before the beginning of diabetes. Classification Min. Level Max. Level Fasting Blood Glucose Level (Prediabetes) 100 mg 126 mg Post Meal Blood Glucose Level (Prediabetes) 140 mg 19 Continue reading >>

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Table 1 Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood Sugar Levels Fasting Values Post Meal Value: 2 hrs after the Meal Normal 70 - 100 mg/dL Less than 140 mg/dL Early Diabetes 101 - 126 mg/dL 140 - 200 mg/dL Diabetes More than 126 mg/dL More than 200 mg/dL Table 2 Normal sugar levels chart during various times of the day Time Blood Sugar Level (mg/dl) After Waking Up 80 - 120 Just Before Meals 80 - 120 About 2 Hours After Meals < 160 Before Sleeping 100 - 140 Table 3 Low Blood Sugar Levels Chart Category Blood Sugar Level Normal 80 - 120 mg/dl Borderline Hypoglycemia 70 mg/dl Fasting Hypoglycemia 50 mg/dl Insulin Shock Less than 50 mg/dl Table 4 High Blood Sugar Levels Chart Category Minimum Level Maximum Level Pre-diabetes Fasting Blood Sugar Level 100 mg 126 mg Pre-diabetes Blood Sugar Level after Meal 140 mg 199 mg Diabetes Blood Sugar Level - Fasting 126 mg More than 126 mg Diabetes Blood Sugar Level After Meal 200 mg More than 200 mg > Blood Sugar Levels Blood sugar, also known as glucose is present in our bloodstream. The body uses glucose as its main form of fuel to produce energy.Glucose is the primary source of energy for the body's cells, produced by digesting the sugar and starch in carbohydrates. Blood lipids are primarily a compact energy store. Glucose is transported from the intestines or liver to body cells via the bloodstream, and is made available for cell absorption via the hormone insulin, produced by the body primarily in the pancreas. Blood sugar level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or animal. Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimolar.The normal range of the blood sugar level maintained by the body for its smooth functioning is Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart For Adults With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels Chart For Adults With Diabetes

Your diabetes care team will set individual blood sugar targets, but as a general guide, the NHS recommends: Note the date, time, results, and any recent activities: Medication and dosage taken What you ate How much and what kind of exercise you were doing That will help you and your doctor see how your treatment is working. Well-managed diabetes can delay or prevent complications that could affect your eyes, kidneys and nerves. Diabetes doubles your risk of heart disease and stroke, too. Fortunately, controlling your blood sugar will also make these problems less likely. Tight blood sugar control, however, means a greater chance of low blood sugar levels, so your doctor may suggest different targets. Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar After Eating A Meal

Normal Range For Blood Sugar After Eating A Meal

When you have diabetes your blood sugar levels can be quite fragile. What are normal blood sugar levels? Blood sugar levels depend on what, when and how much you eat, as well as how effectively your body produces and uses insulin. Your blood sugar levels are an excellent indicator of your risk of developing diabetes; the higher your blood sugar, the greater your risk. Chronic high blood sugar can be a wake-up call, telling you that it’s time to lose weight and make healthier food choices. Normal Blood Glucose / Blood Sugar Level Ranges before Eating Target blood sugar levels depend on the time of day and if you already have diabetes or pre-diabetes. Before you eat, called a fasting or pre-prandial glucose level, a non-diabetic should have a glucose level between 3.88 and 5.3 mmol/L.. If your reading is higher than 5.33 mmol/L. but lower than 6.94mmol/L, you may have insulin resistance or pre-diabetes. Glucose readings above 7 mmol/L indicate you have diabetes. Ideally, if you have type 2 diabetes you should have a fasting glucose level between 3.88 mmol/L and 7.22 mmol/L, when your diabetes is under control due to a combination of diet, exercise and medication if needed. Normal Blood Sugar Ranges after Eating Your blood sugar or blood glucose levels starts to rise soon after you start to eat and is at its highest 1 to 2 hours after your meal. Normal postprandial, which means “after eating,” glucose levels are 6.67 mmol/L and below for non-diabetics, 8.83 mmol/L. and below for those with pre-diabetes and 10 mmol/L for diabetics. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease suggest that two hours after eating, diabetics should have a blood sugar reading of 10 mmol/L or less. If your blood sugar is higher than 18 mmol/L two hours after eating, Continue reading >>

Is A Plant-based Or Low Carb/high Meat Diet Better At Controlling Or Reversing Diabetes?

Is A Plant-based Or Low Carb/high Meat Diet Better At Controlling Or Reversing Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes means blood sugar level is higher than it should be, but not yet high enough to be classed as type 2 diabetes (the blood sugar is borderline high). It’s an early indicator of growing insulin resistance, and without lifestyle changes, people with pre-diabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, even before the development of pre-diabetes, the insulin resistance (IR) score becomes elevated, which is a herald of bad news, indicating high blood glucose levels are right around the corner. So heres the sequence of events: Young, healthy people were taken and split into two groups half on a fat-rich diet and half on a carbohydrate-rich diet and within just two days, glucose intolerance skyrocketed in the fat group. The group on the fat-rich diet ended up with twice the blood sugar. And as the amount of dietary fat increased, so did the blood sugar. But it took scientists nearly seven decades to unravel the mystery of why fat causes type 2 diabetes. When food is consumed, starches are broken down into glucose in our digestive system, it then circulates as blood glucose (“blood sugar”) and is taken up by our muscles to either be stored (as glycogen) or burnt and used for energy. Insulin acts as a ‘key’ to unlock the door and let glucose enter the muscle cells. Without insulin, glucose would remain in the blood, steadily rising to a state called hyperglycemia - high blood sugar. With Type 1 diabetes, the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are damaged so cannot produce insulin, and so insulin injections are required in order for the glucose to move out of the blood into the muscles. However in type 2 diabetes normal insulin exists - but the insulin is unable to ‘unlock’ the muscle cells so the sugar cannot enter the mus Continue reading >>

Chart For High Blood Sugar Levels

Chart For High Blood Sugar Levels

Glucose is simple sugar that is carried from the intestine or the liver through the bloodstream to the cells. By the means of the hormone insulin glucose enters the body cells and serves as the fuel of energy. Therefore, the body’s primary source of energy is glucose. The level of glucose in the blood is controlled by the hormone insulin and the pancreas is the gland responsible for the production of this hormone. Blood sugar level represents the amount of glucose present in the blood. There is the chart with normal blood levels that serves to show whether a person suffers from hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. On the other side, there is also the chart with high blood glucose levels that shows whether the person is pre-diabetic or diabetic. Normal blood sugar levels The blood sugar levels are not the same throughout a day. They tend to fluctuate and that is normal because we eat and the food is one of the main causes for the elevated levels of glucose in the blood. It is considered that the normal range of the blood sugar randomly measured is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. The normal level of glucose in the blood before a meal and in the morning is from 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter, while normal range of the level of glucose in the blood two hours after a meal is between 90 and 140 milligrams per deciliter. High blood sugar levels When a blood test shows a reading from 100 to 126 milligrams per deciliter, it is considered to be the normal range for the pre-diabetes glucose levels in the blood before meals and in the morning. The normal range of the pre-diabetes glucose levels in the blood two hours after a meal is between 140 and 199 milligrams per deciliter. When a blood test shows before a meal or in the morning a reading above 126 milligrams per de Continue reading >>

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

Is My Blood Sugar Normal?

“Is my blood sugar normal?” seems like a simple question – but it’s not! The answer can vary dramatically based on your situation. Let’s look at some of the factors to consider. Please remember: you should figure out your personal goals in consultation with your doctor. Normal Blood Sugar in Diabetic vs. Non-Diabetic First, a quick note on how we measure blood sugar. In the USA, blood sugars are measured by weight in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dL. Most everyone else uses millimole per liter, abbreviated mmol. If you are in the USA, look at the big numbers, most everyone else look at the small numbers. In a person without diabetes, blood sugars tend to stay between 70 and 100 mg/dL (3.8 and 5.5 mmol). After a meal, blood sugars can rise up to 120 mg/dL or 6.7 mmol. It will typically fall back into the normal range within two hours. In a person with diabetes, the story is much more complex: Below 70 mg/dL Below 3.8 mmol Low Blood Sugars (Hypoglycemia). When blood sugars drop below this level, you may start feeling hunger, shakiness, or racing of the heart. Your body is starved for sugar (glucose). Read how to detect and treat low blood sugars. 70 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL 3.8 mmol to 7.7 mmol Normal Blood Sugar. In this range, the body is functioning normally. In someone without diabetes, the vast majority of the time is spent in the lower half of this range. 140 mg/dL to 180 mg/dL 7.7 mmol to 10 mmol Elevated Blood Sugars. In this range, the body can function relatively normally. However, extended periods of time in this zone put you at risk for long-term complications. Above 180 mg/dL Abovoe 10 mmol High Blood Sugars. At this range, the kidney is unable to reabsorb all of the glucose in your blood and you begin to spill glucose in your urine. Your bo Continue reading >>

Which Fruit Is Good In Diabetes.?

Which Fruit Is Good In Diabetes.?

Answer Wiki When you leave your doctor’s office, do you ever wonder what he’s not telling you? Here’s 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor won’t tell you: Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. That’s because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier it’ll be to manage your blood sugar. But here’s the kicker: It’s got to be the right type of fat. You’re looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Here’s some great sources: Fish Eggs (Any eggs labeled “enriched” have plenty of omega-3) Grass-fed beef (There’s lots of omega-3 in the grass) Do Some Pushups… Or any kind of strength exercises. All the cardio your doctor tells you to do will increase your insulin absorption a little, but to really keep your body regulated you’ve got to get your entire body moving. The best way to do that is any exercise that focuses on strength. You want to avoid straining yourself, but make a habit of doing a few pushups every day, throw in some body squats, and soon you’ll be taking tighter control of your blood sugar. Not to mention it’ll get rid of stress, and give you plenty of energy. Relax Laying back and keeping cool are vital to regulating your blood sugar. Stress causes physical distress on the body which affects blood glucose levels. Not to mention, when you’re stressed out it’s easy to overeat, which obviously wreaks havoc on your blood sugar. For easy relaxation, try out simple meditation or breathing exercises. These tricks will help, but… If You Want to REVERSE your Type 2 Diabetes and never worry about your blood sugar again, here’s what you need: A recent medical breakthrough at Newcastle University has revealed 3 Proven Steps to Reverse Type-2 Diabetes. Click the link below to find Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Blood glucose (sugar) is the amount of glucose in your blood at a given time. It is important to check your blood glucose (sugar) levels, because it will: Provide a quick measurement of your blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Determine if you have a high or low blood glucose (sugar) level at a given time; Show you how your lifestyle and medication affect your blood glucose (sugar) levels; and Help you and your diabetes health-care team to make lifestyle and medication changes that will improve your blood glucose (sugar) levels. How often should you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels? How frequently you check your blood glucose (sugar) levels should be decided according to your own treatment plan. You and your health-care provider can discuss when and how often you should check your blood glucose (sugar) levels. Checking your blood glucose (sugar) levels is also called Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG). How do you test your blood glucose levels? A blood glucose (sugar) meter is used to check your blood glucose (sugar) at home. You can get these meters at most pharmacies or from your diabetes educator. Talk with your diabetes educator or pharmacist about which one is right for you. Once you receive a meter, ensure you receive the proper training before you begin to use it. Ask your health-care provider about: How and where to draw blood How to use and dispose of lancets (the device that punctures your skin) The size of the drop of blood needed The type of blood glucose (sugar) strips to use How to clean the meter How to check if the meter is accurate How to code your meter (if needed) Note: Your province or territory may subsidize the cost of blood glucose (sugar) monitoring supplies. Contact your local Diabetes Canada branch to find out if this appli Continue reading >>

Blood - Sugar Chart

Blood - Sugar Chart

Diabetes is a condition where success of treatment depends on how well you keep your blood sugar controlled. Use Medindia's Blood Sugar Calculator if you have recently got tested for blood glucose level or taken an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test. Over a period of time you will learn how to manage the condition yourself and will understand why your sugar level fluctuates. Blood sugar chart provides descriptions of blood sugar values in terms of mg/dl depending on the test type – Fasting sugar, post-meal or post prandial and Glucose tolerance test (GTT) for a normal person, in early diabetes and in established diabetes. Use this chart to monitor your blood sugar level. Blood Sugar Chart Category Fasting Value (mg/dl) Post Prandial (mg/dl) Minimum Value Maximum Value Value 2 hours after consuming glucose Normal 70 100 Less than 140 Early Diabetes 101 126 140 to 200 Established Diabetes More than 126 - More than 200 Blood Sugar Calculator Choose Test Type * Select Fasting Blood Glucose Random Blood Glucose Level Select the Blood Glucose Value Type * mg / dl mmol / L Select the Blood Glucose Value* Select 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 2 Continue reading >>

More in diabetes