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High Blood Sugar Emergency Symptoms

Acute Emergencies Of Diabetes

Acute Emergencies Of Diabetes

Hypoglycemia: Low Blood Sugar (Insulin Reaction) Warning signs and symptoms of low blood sugar (insulin reaction) happen suddenly. Signs and symptoms can easily be mistaken for misbehavior. The child may not recognize symptoms developing. Severity of a low blood sugar reaction progresses from mild to severe. Severe reactions are preventable by early detection and treatment of low blood sugars. Be familiar with identification and treatment of low blood sugar to avert an emergency situation. Blood sugar can go to low if the child with diabetes has: taken too much insulin not eaten enough food had extra exercise without extra food Mild Hypoglycemia Signs and Symptoms Treatment Behavioral Signs: A wide variety of behaviors can occur. Behavior changes may include: acting quiet and withdrawn being stubborn or restless tantrums of sudden rage confusion inappropriate emotional responses (eg: laughter, crying) poor concentration or day dreaming Shakiness Sweatiness Headache Dizziness Pallor Increased Heart Rate NOTE: It may take the child several hours to recover following a low blood sugar episode. The student should not be expected to perform at optimal levels, but having diabetes should never be an excuse for poor overall school If you don't know what the blood sugar is, treat the symptoms. Never send a child who you suspect is having a low blood sugar to the nurse's office. Send another student to get help if you need it. Give the child some quick-acting sugar such as: 3 - 4 ounces of juice 6 - 8 ounces of REGULAR pop 2 - 4 glucose tablets 5 - 6 lifesavers 6 - 8 ounces Milk Check the blood sugar 20 -30 minutes after treatment. If the blood sugar result is less than 80, or if the child still has symptoms, repeat the quick sugar treatment and blood sugar testing cycle until th Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of A Diabetic Emergency?

What Are The Symptoms Of A Diabetic Emergency?

Diabetes is becoming a more common disease, now affecting 23.6 million children and adults in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Association. There are several types of diabetes, and once diagnosed, your physician will educate and monitor you closely to ensure optimal and safe health care for your condition. Knowing the symptoms of a diabetic emergency is useful whether you suffer from the disease yourself, have a friend or family member with the condition or happen upon a stranger in a diabetic crisis. All diabetic emergencies require immediate medical attention. If you experience a diabetic emergency firsthand, or are providing care for someone who is, call 911 immediately. Video of the Day Hypoglycemia is a condition in which someone is suffering from dangerously low levels of blood sugar. For someone who is diabetic, this usually results from taking too much insulin or not eating properly. The sugar found in the blood is a necessary food for the brain and other organs to function properly and low bood sugar needs to be treated immediately. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include cold and clammy skin, confusion, poor balance, feeling faint and rapid heartbeat. Call 911, and while waiting for the ambulance provide sugary drinks such as orange juice and soda, or place pure sugar under the tongue and inside the mouth. If the person has become unconscious, only put the a small amount of sugar under the tongue and along the inside of the cheeks, while rolling the person onto their side. Monitor them to ensure choking does not result. Hyperglycemia is when blood sugar levels are excessively high. The symptoms are very similar to hypoglycemia and are often confused before medical treatment is received. If you are in doubt to which scenario a diabetic is sufferin Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

High Blood Sugar Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high (hyperglycemia) can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high blood sugar levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body, and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hyperglycemia. Extremely high blood sugar levels can lead to one of two conditions—diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1, and HHNS is more common in type 2. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Ketoacidosis (or DKA) occurs when blood sugars become elevated (over 249 mg/dl, or 13.9 mmol/l) over a period of time and the body begins to burn fat for energy, resulting in ketone bodies in the blood or urine (a phenomenon called ketosis). A variety of factors can cause hyperglycemia (high blood glucose), including failure to take medication or insulin, stress, dietary changes without medication adjustments, eating disorders, and illness or injury. This last cause is important, because if illness brings on DKA, it may slip by unnoticed, since its symptoms can mimic the flu (aches, vomiting, etc.). In fact, people with type 1 diabetes are often seeking help for the flu-like symptoms of DKA when they first receive their diagnosis. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: fruity (acetone) breath nausea and/or vomiting abdominal pain dry, warm skin confusion fatigue breathing problems excessive thirst frequent urination in extreme cases, loss of consciousness DKA is a medical emergency, and requires prompt and immediate treatment. A simple over-the-counter urine dipstick test (e.g., Keto Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of High Blood Sugar

Topic Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) is most often seen in people who have diabetes that isn't well controlled. The symptoms of high blood sugar can be mild, moderate, or severe. Mild high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently higher than your target range (usually 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) to 350 mg/dL in adults and 200 mg/dL to 240 mg/dL in children), you may have mild symptoms of high blood sugar. You may urinate more than usual if you are drinking plenty of liquids. Some people who have diabetes may not notice any symptoms when their blood sugar level is in this range. The main symptoms of high blood sugar are: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Weight loss. Fatigue. Increased appetite. Young children are unable to recognize symptoms of high blood sugar. Parents need to do a home blood sugar test on their child whenever they suspect high blood sugar. If you don't drink enough liquids to replace the fluids lost from high blood sugar levels, you can become dehydrated. Young children can become dehydrated very quickly. Symptoms of dehydration include: A dry mouth and increased thirst. Warm, dry skin. Moderate to severe high blood sugar If your blood sugar levels are consistently high (usually above 350 mg/dL in adults and above 240 mg/dL in children), you may have moderate to severe symptoms of high blood sugar. These symptoms include: Blurred vision. Extreme thirst. Lightheadedness. Flushed, hot, dry skin. Restlessness, drowsiness, or difficulty waking up. If your body produces little or no insulin (people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes), you also may have: Rapid, deep breathing. A fast heart rate and a weak pulse. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and/or vomiting. If your Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And Steps To Save Someone’s Life

Diabetic Emergencies: Warning Signs And Steps To Save Someone’s Life

A diabetic can develop hyperglycemia (raised blood sugar) or hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Giving sugar will be lifesaving if blood sugar is low, and is unlikely to do harm if sugar levels are raised. Diabetics usually know how to control their condition, but even people who’ve had diabetes for years or decades may be susceptible to an attack. Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Symptoms: This can occur if the blood sugar-insulin balance is incorrect. A person with diabetes often recognizes the warning signs: Feels shaky and weak Skin is pale and feels cold and clammy Confused, irritable, and behaving irrationally Rapid, but full and pounding pulse; patient may tell you that his heart is pounding Patient will quickly lose consciousness if he is not given some sugar If you know a patient has diabetes and he fails to respond to sugar or his condition begins to worsen, call for medical help immediately. A person recently diagnosed with diabetes is more susceptible to a “hypo” attack, especially while he is becoming used to balancing his sugar-insulin levels. What to Do for Hypoglycemia 1. Sit patient down. Reassure him and help him to sit down on a chair or on the floor if he is feeling faint. 2. Give sugar. If the patient is fully conscious and alert, give him a sugary drink, such as fruit juice, or some glucose tablets. People with diabetes often carry a dose of glucose concentrate or have some sugary food on hand as a precaution. 3. Check response. If the patient improves quickly after eating or drinking something, follow this with some slower-release carbohydrate food, such as a cereal bar, a sandwich, a piece of fruit, biscuits and milk, or the next meal if the timing is right. 4. Find medication. Help the patient find his glucose testing kit and medication and let Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

High Blood Sugar Symptoms And Information

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than normal. It is the main problem caused by diabetes. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called glucose. How does it occur? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, high blood sugar happens because your body is not making insulin. Insulin moves sugar from the blood into your cells. It is normally made by the pancreas. If you have type 2 diabetes, high blood sugar usually happens because the cells have become unable to use the insulin your body is making. In both cases high levels of sugar build up in the blood. Sometimes people with diabetes can have high blood sugar even if they are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: skipping your diabetes medicine or not taking the right amount of medicine if you are using insulin: a problem with your insulin (for example, the wrong type or damage to the insulin because it has not been stored properly) if you are using an insulin pump: a problem with the pump (for example, the pump is turned off or the catheter has come out) taking medicines that make your blood sugar medicines work less well (steroids, hormones or water pills) eating or drinking too much (that is, taking in too many calories) not getting enough physical activity emotional or physical stress illness, including colds and flu, especially if there is fever infections, such as an abscessed tooth or urinary tract infection Even if you don’t have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar for a brief time after you eat a food very high in sugar. For exam Continue reading >>

Treating Diabetes Emergencies

Treating Diabetes Emergencies

Blood sugar levels that are too high or too low can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high or low blood glucose levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome. Low Blood Sugar Emergencies (Hypoglycemia) Hypoglycemia is sometimes called insulin reaction because it is more frequent in people with diabetes who take insulin. However, it can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and is also commonly caused by certain oral medications, missed meals, and exercise without proper precautions. The typical threshold for hypoglycemia is 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/l), although it may be higher or lower depending on a patient's individual blood glucose target range. Symptoms include erratic heartbeat, sweating, dizziness, confusion, unexplained fatigue, shakiness, hunger, and potential loss of consciousness. Once a low is recognized, it should be treated immediately with a fast-acting carbohydrate such as glucose tablets or juice. High Blood Sugar Emergencies (DKA or HHNS) Extremely high blood glucose levels can lead to one of two conditions diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS; also called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma). Although both syndromes can occur in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, DKA is more common in type 1 and HHNS is more common in type 2. Continue reading >>

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

> Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin (type 1 diabetes) or can't respond to insulin properly (type 2 diabetes). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or teens with diabetes who have had the disease for only a few years. However, they can happen in adulthood in some people, particularly if they haven't managed or controlled their diabetes properly. Blood sugar levels are considered high when they're above someone's target range. The diabetes health care team will let you know what your child's target blood sugar levels are, which will vary based on factors like your child's age. A major goal in controlling diabetes is to keep blood sugar levels as close to the desired range as possible. It's a three-way balancing act of: diabetes medicines (such as in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetes is a lifelong medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a chemical made by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach), which regulates the blood sugar (glucose) level in the body. Normally our bodies automatically keep the right blood sugar levels, but for someone with diabetes their body can't. Instead, they have to control the blood sugar level themselves by monitoring what they eat, and taking insulin injections or pills. There are two types of diabetes: Type1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar becomes either too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital. Watch our video - diabetic emergency Hyperglycaemia Too little insulin can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). If it’s not treated and gets worse, the person can gradually become unresponsive (going into a diabetic coma). So it's important to get them to see a doctor in case they need emergency treatment. Hypoglycaemia Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia (hypo). This often happens when someone with diabetes misses a meal or does too much exercise. It can also happen after someone has had an epileptic seizure or has been binge drinking. If someone knows they are diabetic, they may recognise the start of a hypo attack, but without help they may quickly become weak and unresponsive. What to look for - Diabetic emergency If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathin Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than recommended for you. If you don’t keep your blood sugar at a normal, healthy level most of the time, you will increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney problems, and loss of vision. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. What is the cause? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Normally the hormone insulin moves this sugar into your cells, where your body uses it for energy. In diabetes the insulin is not moving the sugar into the cells, so it builds up in the bloodstream and starts to cause problems. Sometimes you may have high blood sugar even though you are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: Skipping your diabetes medicine Not taking the right amount of diabetes medicine Taking certain medicines that increase your blood sugar or make your blood sugar medicines work less well Taking in too many calories by eating large portions of food, choosing too many high-calorie foods, or drinking too many high-sugar beverages Eating too many carbohydrates, such as foods made mainly with sugar, white flour (in bread, biscuits, pancakes, for example), white potatoes, or white rice Not getting enough physical activity (exercise lowers your blood sugar) Having increased emotional or physical stress Being sick, including colds, flu, an infected tooth, or a urinary tract infection, especially if you have a fever If you are using insulin, having a problem with your insulin (for examp Continue reading >>

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a systemic disease of the endocrine system resulting from the insufficiency/dysfunction of the pancreas. It is a complex disorder of fat, carbohydrates, and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is potentially lethal, putting the patient at risk for several types of medical emergencies. It is characterized by a lack of insulin, or a persons inability to use insulin. In order to properly manage the numerous calls for diabetics, it is important for EMS professionals to have a basic knowledge of diabetes (DM) before dealing with the associated emergencies that may arise as a result of the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, as well as, it is estimated that 5 + million US citizens become diabetic annually and don't realize they have the disease until an emergency arises. To truly understand the signs and symptoms of the various related conditions, we must first, comprehend some basic pathophysiology. The primary energy fuel for cells is glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that accounts for approximately 95 percent of the sugar in the bloodstream after gastrointestinal absorption. Thus, it is the blood glucose level that EMS and other health care practitioners are most interested in determining. The key function of insulin (A hormone secreted by the beta cells in the pancreas) is to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it can be used for energy. However, insulin does not directly carry glucose into the cell, it triggers a receptor on the plasma membrane to open a channel allowing a protein helper (through the process of facilitated diffusion), to carry the glucose molecule into the cell. As long as any insulin is available in the blood, is active, is effective, and is able to stimulate the rece Continue reading >>

Emergency Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

Emergency Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar is usually a diabetic medical condition, where the body cannot regulate its own blood sugar levels. A diabetic must take insulin in order to regulate his or her blood sugar, but if you have type 1 diabetes and there is no insulin available, or the wrong amount of insulin is taken, your blood sugar can shoot up. If you have type 2 diabetes and your body is not processing insulin like it should, your blood sugar levels can also rise. Hyperglycemia, or extremely high blood sugar, can occur in both scenarios. Symptoms of Hyperglycemia and Ketoacidosis If your blood sugar too high, you may start to experience strange symptoms. These symptoms include frequent urination, frequent thirst, high blood glucose levels and high sugar levels in the urine. If you continue to ignore these symptoms without treating them, you could go into a diabetic coma, also known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body begins to break down fat cells to use as energy instead of glucose. This is a highly dangerous condition. As your body begins to break down the fat cells, it will create a waste product called ketones, which will be released through the urine. Your doctor can test to see if you have ketones in your urine. Other symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea and vomiting, sweet-smelling breath, dry mouth and shortness of breath. Treating High Blood Sugar Yourself If you have tested your blood sugar and notice that it is high, a quick fix to lower your blood sugar is exercising. If you are experiencing no symptoms of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, it is safe to exercise. It is not safe to exercise, however, if you are experiencing ketoacidosis or have ketones in your urine, because exercise can make your blood sugar levels shoot up higher. Ketones generally occur in Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

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