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High Blood Sugar And Low Oxygen

Normal Blood Oxygen Levels: What Is Safe And What Is Low?

Normal Blood Oxygen Levels: What Is Safe And What Is Low?

Blood oxygen level is the amount of oxygen circulating in the blood. Most of the oxygen is carried by red blood cells, which collect oxygen from the lungs and deliver it to all parts of the body. The body closely monitors blood oxygen levels to keep them within a specific range, so that there is enough oxygen for the needs of every cell in the body. A person's blood oxygen level is an indicator of how well the body distributes oxygen from the lungs to the cells, and it can be important for people's health. Blood oxygen levels may be measured using a pulse oximeter. The most efficient way to monitor blood oxygen levels is by an arterial blood gas or ABG test. For this test, a blood sample is taken from an artery, usually in the wrist. This procedure is very accurate, but it can be a little painful. An ABG test can be difficult to do at home, so a person may wish to do an alternative test, using a small device known as a pulse oximeter. A pulse oximeter is a small clip that is often put on a finger, although it can also be used on the ear or toe. It measures blood oxygen indirectly by light absorption through a person's pulse. Although the pulse oximeter test is easier, quicker, and not painful, it is not as accurate as the ABG test. This is because it can be influenced by factors such as dirty fingers, bright lights, nail polish, and poor circulation to the extremities. For people who wish to purchase a pulse oximeter, there is a range of easy-to-use devices available online . A normal blood oxygen level varies between 75 and 100 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) . A blood oxygen level below 60 mm Hg is considered low and may require oxygen supplementation, depending on a doctor's decision and the individual case. When blood oxygen level is too low compared to the average Continue reading >>

Adult Onset Diabetes - Oxygenated Blood Can Help

Adult Onset Diabetes - Oxygenated Blood Can Help

Introductory Ozone Therapy Articles Ozone Therapy Basics A Review of Ozone Therapy Applications Knee, Back, and Shoulder Pain Cured with Prolozone Amazing Ozone Healing Miracles from Cuba Ozone-Oxygen Therapies Ozone Therapy: New Breakthrough for Back Treatment The Politics of AIDS and Ozone What is Ozone? Medical Ozone and Cancer Why Use Ozone Therapy? Advanced Ozone Therapy Articles Adult Onset Diabetes - Ozone Can Help Healing Ozone AIDS and Cancer Cured Ozone - A Wide Spectrum Healer Ozone - The Breath of Life Ozone Studies Coming Soon! As many Ozone Therapy Articles that we can find, in English. If you have any official Ozone Studies you would like to send us so we can post them on this site, please email them to us! Thank you! Adult Onset Diabetes - Oxygenated Blood can Help From: Alternative Medicine Magazine, Issue 26, November 1998, Pages 26 - 28 (Please Read the related Article: 552 Million People could have Diabetes by 2030) YOU DON'T normally think of oxygen as a treatment for diabetes, but according to Frank Shallenberger, M.D., H.M.D., director of the Nevada Center of Alternative and Anti-Aging Medicine in Carson City, Nevada, ozone (a less stable, more reactive form of oxygen) can produce remarkable improvements in both the major and secondary symptoms of adult- onset diabetes. The connection between the ozone and diabetes is the blood circulation, Dr. Shallenberger says, as demonstrated in the following cases. Virginia, 51, had been diabetic for five years and was taking Glucotrol, an oral medication for controlling blood sugar levels. However, Virginia came to Dr. Shallenberger seeking treatment for recurrent breast cancer, a tumor that periodically grew then diminished. Dr. Shallenberger decided to ozonate her blood as ozone is often used as a healing Continue reading >>

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The Problem Of Tissue Oxygenation In Diabetes Mellitus. I. Its Relation To The Early Functional Changes In The Microcirculation Of Diabetic Subjects.

The problem of tissue oxygenation in diabetes mellitus. I. Its relation to the early functional changes in the microcirculation of diabetic subjects. The underlying cause leading to the reversible functional changes in the microcirculation of insulin-dependent diabetic subjects early during the disease prior to any clinical signs of retinopathy and nephropathy (functional microangiopathy) is discussed. It is suggested that the initial microvascular dilation observed in diabetics is due to an autoregulatory response to relative tissue hypoxia providing an increased tissue perfusion in order to improve tissue oxygen delivery. Supporting evidence for this suggestion is derived from the findings that diabetics simultaneously may show increased tissue oxygen consumption and decreased ability of the circulating blood to release oxygen to the tissues. The latter defect is likely to be caused by two interrelated factors: 1. an increased proportion of haemoglobin A1c with high oxygen affinity, and 2. difficulties of maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of plasma inorganic phosphate in order to provide an optimal 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) content in the erythrocytes. The basal oxygen demand of diabetics may fluctuate even within a few hours dependent upon the state of metabolic control and is increased at times of poor regulation. Hence, diabetics may suffer from innumerable cellular hypoxic injuries, which during the first years of the disease are counteracted in the microcirculation by an autoregulatory response. These microvascular reactions associated with increased plasma permeation may over the years be of major importance for the development of the degenerative microangiopathy in diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

Diabetes Cause: Low Oxygen In Cells Due To Heavy Breathing

What causes diabetes? On a cell level, the cause of diabetes is simple. Several medical research groups (Moritz et al, 2002; Carroll & Ashcroft, 2006; Regazzetti et al, 2009; Halberg et al, 2009; Heinis et al, 2010; Cheng et al, 2010) have recently discovered that oxygen levels in pancreatic beta-cells regulate activity of pancreatic cells through hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha. Tissue hypoxia and reduced perfusion lead to poor glucose and insulin control, and insulin resistance. There are many other problems caused by tissue hypoxia. The reasons behind low body O2 is heavy breathing. This fact was confirmed by all 5 clinical studies that measured breathing rates in people with diabetes mellitus. Minute ventilation numbers explain the diabetes cause *One row corresponds to one research paper or medical science article Condition Minute ventilation Number of patients All references or click below for abstracts var ezzns22 = {0.50:504556,1.80:504655,4.50:504667,1.50:504652,1.60:504653,3.00:504664,0.05:504099,0.80:504559,1.00:504647,1.30:504650,0.35:504552,2.60:504660,3.50:504665,0.30:504551,0.45:504555,0.60:504557,0.70:504558,0.40:504554,0.90:504560,2.00:504657,5.00:504669,2.40:504659,2.80:504661,0.10:504141,0.15:504144,1.40:504651,1.90:504656,1.70:504654,2.20:504658,4.00:504666,0.20:504145,0.25:504548,1.10:504648,1.20:504649,}; var ezoflbf_2_22 = function() { __ez.queue.addFunc('ReloadFromP_1022', 'IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLlILlLiiLLIiILL.ReloadFromP', 1022, false, ['banger.js'], false, false, false, true); }; var ezoflbf_22 = function() { eval(ez_write_tag([[300,250],'normalbreathing_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_4'])); };ezoflbf_22(); var __ezfl_sss_1022 = function() { setTimeout(function(){ var ezflaun = IL11ILILIIlLLLILILLLLIILLLIIL11111LLILiiLIliLl Continue reading >>

Oxygen Could Be The Key To A Cure For Diabetes

Oxygen Could Be The Key To A Cure For Diabetes

Oxygen could be the key to a cure for diabetes Oxygen could be the key to a cure for diabetes With Obesity steadily increasing in the Western world, the number of people suffering from Diabetes has become grossly excessive and is on the increase. The treatment of Diabetes demands that the diabetic make drastic lifestyle changes. These changes can include: weight loss, rigid exercise programs and a complete restructuring of a persons diet. Unfortunately many patients struggle to initiate and maintain these changes and find themselves being gradually and increasingly affected by damaging symptoms of the disease. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the immune system attacking itself and destroying cells in the pancreas. The pancreas produces insulin and so it results in the body not producing enough. It can be caused by an infection, toxins or an autoimmune reaction. Type 2 diabetes can be caused by multiple risk factors including obesity, increasing age, poor diet, pregnancy and illness. When there isnt enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) cant get into the bodys cells and builds up in the bloodstream. Since the cells arent getting the glucose they need, they cant function properly and the build up causes damage in multiple areas of the body, leading to many various diabetes-related diseases and conditions. A new bio-material has been designed which has the capacity to spontaneously generate oxygen when it is exposed to water. This material allows oxygen to be released in the bloodstream in targeted or generalised areas increasing oxygen levels within the body and not relying on lung function. A major potential use of this material is that it can be used in transplantation and skin grafts. Normally when new cells are surgically placed it ta Continue reading >>

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Is Oxygen Key To Insulin Resistance?

Oxygen is key to life but could it also be a key factor in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes? We take a look at the evidence behind this idea and also which methods could use oxygen towards our advantage in tackling insulin resistance. A 2014 study found a link between the lack of oxygen on Everest and insulin resistance. Some research studies appear to show quite conclusively that restricting oxygen intake does indeed result in increased insulin resistance. A study carried out by researchers from the University of Southampton and University College London, published in 2014, investigated the effects of low oxygen levels on insulin resistance by taking adults up Mount Everest. The researchers found that as the participants reached higher altitudes, and were thus exposed to low levels of oxygen to breathe, they developed insulin resistance. Oxygen chamber improves insulin sensitivity By contrast, the opposite effect has also been observed. Researchers from the University of Adelaide tested the effects by exposing people with type 2 diabetes to a total of six periods of 90 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen therapy over a five-week period. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves spending time in a pressurised diving chamber containing 100% oxygen. The technique resulted in a dramatic 40% improvement in insulin sensitivity, an effect that would usually require a 13% loss of body weight. It seems apparent from this that the more oxygen we get, the better insulin sensitivity we have. Could oxygen also explain why people get insulin resistance in normal life at normal non-mountainous altitudes? It is notable that sleep apnea, a problem that results in disrupted breathing during sleep, is very closely related with type 2 diabetes. Sleep apnea shares obesity as a common major risk f Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia may be described as an excess of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Your endocrine system regulates the amount of sugar that is stored and used for energy. It is important in brain cell function, and energy levels. Since the sugar that you consume in your diet is either used or stored, certain conditions and disorders may cause you to have difficulty processing and storing blood glucose, resulting in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. One hormone that is important to the normal storing and processing of sugar is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas that is responsible for maintaining "normal" blood sugar levels. If you have a problem with your pancreas, then you may have increased blood sugar levels. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels higher than these might indicate hyperglycemia. Causes of Hyperglycemia: Diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes, have diabetes of adult onset (Diabetes type 2). You are more at risk for developing diabetes if you are older, extremely overweight (obese), if you have a family history of diabetes (parents, siblings), and if you are of African-American, Hispanic American, or Native-American heritage. People who have diabetes have an underproduction of the hormone, insulin, which lowers your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will have problems with elevated blood sugar levels. If you develop diabetes type 2, and you are an adult, your healthcare provider may prescribe medications in a pill form, which allow your body to process insulin that is needed for maintaining "normal" blood glucose levels. It is likely that your pancreas is producing enough insulin, but your body is resistant to the insulin, a Continue reading >>

Pulse Oximetry Not Reliable For Diabetic Patients?

Pulse Oximetry Not Reliable For Diabetic Patients?

Summarized from Pu L, Shen Y, Lu L et al. Increased blood glycohemoglobin A1c levels lead to overestimation of arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cardiovascular Diabetology 2012; 11: 110. As accessed: www.cardiab.com/content/11/1/110 December 2012. Pulse oximeters, which are ubiquitous in nearly all areas of clinical care, provide the means for safe, non-invasive continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation. The validity of using pulse oximetry to assess patient blood oxygenation status depends on SpO2, the parameter measured by pulse oximetry, being a reliable estimate of arterial oxygen saturation (sO2(a)), the parameter directly measured during blood gas analysis. In most clinical contexts SpO2 is more or less equal to sO2(a), but that is not always the case and it is important to be aware of the limitations of pulse oximetry and define clinical situations when there is no alternative to blood gas analysis for accurate assessment of blood oxygenation. According to the results of a recent clinical study, pulse oximetry may not be suitable for assessment of blood oxygenation among type 2 diabetic patients with poor glycemic control and consequent increased HbA1c. The study population comprised 261 type 2 diabetes patients who were critically ill and required oxygen therapy and/or mechanical ventilation. Their care included continuous monitoring of oxygen saturation using a pulse oximeter. Fasting blood was sampled from each study patient for glucose and HbA1c. Arterial blood was sampled for blood gas analysis, including measurement of sO2(a). As arterial blood was sampled, the patient’s SpO2 reading from pulse oximeter was recorded. For the purposes of this study poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c > 7.0 %; by th Continue reading >>

What Are The Effects Of Low Blood Oxygen Levels?

What Are The Effects Of Low Blood Oxygen Levels?

What Are the Effects of Low Blood Oxygen Levels? Shannon Campbell is a scientist and a small business owner. Based in Boulder, Colo., she is passionate about health and medical technologies. She holds a bachelors degree in human biology and biochemistry from the University of Guelph, and a PhD in human physiology from the University of Melbourne. What Are the Effects of Low Blood Oxygen Levels?Photo Credit: philipimage/iStock/Getty Images Blood carries oxygen to every cell in your body to allow them to live and function properly. Low blood oxygen levels -- known as hypoxemia -- typically refer to an oxygen level in your arteries less than 80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). If the oxygen level in your blood is too low, your cells cannot function normally. The effects of hypoxemia depend on whether it is mild or severe and how long it has been present. Shortness of breath and an increased breathing rate are common, and changes in energy levels, heart function and brain function may occur as well. If left untreated, severe hypoxemia can be fatal. The most common effects of low blood oxygen levels are related to the respiratory system. In an effort to increase the amount of oxygen in the blood, breathing increases above the normal rate of around 12 to 16 breaths per minute. Rates of 24 breaths per minute or even higher may occur. As such, feeling short of breath is generally one of the first and most obvious symptoms. The heart rate also increases to help circulate oxygen-containing blood throughout the body in an attempt to meet the cells' needs. Anxiety or restlessness, fatigue and headaches are other common effects of mild hypoxemia. If hypoxemia worsens, brain function can become impaired, creating symptoms such as a decreased attention span, confusion and disorientati Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

Causes Of Low Blood Oxygen Levels

Causes Of Low Blood Oxygen Levels

Dr. Margaret Baker studied biochemistry, pharmacology and nutrition, and conducted research on cancer therapeutics. She served as a patent agent for the biopharmaceutical division of a Fortune 500 company. Dr. Baker has published in peer reviewed journals, e-Books, and is a frequent commenter on discoveries in the life sciences. Causes of Low Blood Oxygen LevelsPhoto Credit: 7activestudio/iStock/Getty Images The cells of the human body require a constant supply of oxygen to produce the energy necessary to accomplish their life-sustaining functions. Oxygen derived from the air is delivered via the bloodstream to the body organs and tissues. A low blood oxygen level, or hypoxemia, can occur due to reduced environmental oxygen or a problem affecting the respiratory or circulatory system. In many people with hypoxemia, several factors contribute to the low blood oxygen level. Reduced Environmental Oxygen and Hypoventilation Breathing in a sufficient amount of oxygen from the air is the first step in ensuring adequate oxygen delivery to the body tissues. A reduced amount of oxygen in the air can result in hypoxemia. This most commonly occurs in people who rapidly ascend to extremely high altitudes, such as mountain climbers. Breathing too slowly or too shallowly -- or hypoventilation -- can also lead to hypoxemia. Hypoventilation leads to inadequate oxygen intake by the lungs and a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood, both of which contribute to hypoxemia. Hypoventilation can occur for many reasons, including: -- suppressed respiratory signaling from the brain due to drug or alcohol toxicity, or a brain injury -- nervous system conditions that interfere with breathing signals from the brain, such as Guillain-Barre syndrome, Lou Gehrig disease or a spinal cord injury -- c Continue reading >>

7 Reasons Why You May Suffer From Low Oxygen Levels

7 Reasons Why You May Suffer From Low Oxygen Levels

Home Conditions Fatigue/Brain fog 7 Reasons Why You May Suffer From Low Oxygen Levels 7 Reasons Why You May Suffer From Low Oxygen Levels Hypoxia can cause problems with the mitochondria and the brain. Read this post to learn why, how to find out, and what to do about it. Mitochondrial problems are at the heart of all chronic diseases. When your mitochondria are working well, you will build up healthy levels of ATP and NAD+ levels, which are important for energy utilization and metabolism. ATP converts to cyclic AMP , which is a critical messenger molecule for so many cellular processes.cAMP is needed for theregulation of glycogen, sugar, and lipid metabolism. Your body fights infections with the superoxide thats created from oxygen. Your health and energy will in part depend on how much oxygen you have and how well your mitochondria utilize it. Now theres obviously more to the story, but you want to make sure the fundamentals are right. A pulse oximeter is the easiest method to measure blood oxygen, but its only a part of the story. People think that oxygen levels can be measured simplywith a pulse oximeter. Pulse oximetersmeasure what percentage of hemoglobin , the protein in blood that carries oxygen, is loaded with oxygen. It knows this by measuring the amount of red vs infrared that gets absorbed in the tissue. Oxygenated hemoglobin absorbs more infrared light and allows more red light to pass through. However, this doesnt measure the number of red blood cells and hemoglobin . It also doesnt measure how much blood you have in a given area, especially your brain, where you need it most. You should measure 99-100% on thePulse Oximeterif you want optimal function. Red blood cells carry hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. The more red blood cells you have, the more you Continue reading >>

Low Oxygen Saturation & What Spo2 Levels Say About Your Health

Low Oxygen Saturation & What Spo2 Levels Say About Your Health

Low Oxygen Saturation & What SPO2 Levels Say About Your Health Oftentimes when thinking about health people tend to monitor their weight, ability to move around, or even their blood pressure or blood sugar levels. Yet, SpO2 levels are a key indicator of health as well, and an oxygen saturation monitor is a simple device to use. An oxygen saturation monitor measures the amount of oxygen in the blood, or the SpO2 level. SpO2 stands for peripheral capillary oxygen saturation. To understand exactly what that means, it is helpful to understand how these monitors work . The blood is made up of a protein called hemoglobin that transports oxygen to cells throughout the body. A pulse oximeter, or oxygen saturation monitor, uses light sensors to read it. When hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen it is bright. As the amount of oxygen decreases, the blood darkens. Pulse oximeters monitor the amount of blood in the capillaries around the peripheral, or in thin skin using this method. It is sensed in the peripheral, such as a fingertip or earlobe because it is easier to shine light through those areas. The amount of oxygenation in your blood can tell you a lot about your health. Oxygen is an energy source for the entire human body. By providing energy, oxygen allows the cells to do their job, grow and repair. It is a vital part of life, and a key to overall health. Absence of oxygen leads to death, but poor oxygenation over long periods of time has detrimental effects as well. Poor blood oxygenation can lead to a host of undesirable health issues including: Adequate blood oxygenation works against the negative effects and has additional benefits for people seeking health. Even those who are already at peak levels of health, such as athletes, can benefit from monitoring their levels o Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

The Connection Between Oxygen And Diabetes

A lack of O2 in fat cells triggers inflammation and insulin resistance in obesity Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, described the sequence of early cellular responses to a high-fat diet, one that can result in obesity-induced insulin resistance and diabetes. The findings, published in the June 5 issue of Cell, also suggest potential molecular targets for preventing or reversing the process. “We’ve described the etiology of obesity-related diabetes. We’ve pinpointed the steps, the way the whole thing happens,” said Jerrold M. Olefsky, MD, associate dean for Scientific Affairs and Distinguished Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego. “The research is in mice, but the evidence suggests that the processes are comparable in humans and these findings are important to not just understanding how diabetes begins, but how better to treat and prevent it.” More than 25 million Americans have diabetes – 8.3 percent of the population – with another 79 million Americans estimated to be pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels poorly regulated by either inadequate insulin production or because cells to not respond properly to the regulating hormone. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and a major risk factor for other life-threatening conditions, including heart disease and stroke. Past research by Olefsky and others has shown that obesity is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose or fat tissues and that this inflammatory state can become chronic and result in systemic insulin resistance and diabetes. In today’s Cell paper, the scientists describe the earliest stages of the process, which Continue reading >>

What Problems Can Result From Having Too Much Blood Sugar?

What Problems Can Result From Having Too Much Blood Sugar?

Having too much sugar in your blood is like having too much rain in a small pond—the flooding can cause damage for everything around it. Too much blood sugar can: Weaken junctions between the smooth endothelial cells lining your arteries, making the Teflon lining more vulnerable to nicks. Cause your white blood cells to stop fighting infections, thus weakening your immune system. Trigger a chemical process in your red blood cells, which transport oxygen in your bloodstream, that causes your red blood cells to want to hold onto oxygen more tightly. That keeps oxygen from getting to your tissues. When that happens, the glucose (sugar), like a lost puppy, attaches to whatever it can find—most likely proteins in your blood and tissues. These proteins deposit in tissues, which leads to the development of cataracts, joint abnormalities, and lung problems. Get into your nerves and cause a reaction that makes your nerves swell, become compressed, and lose their ability to function—usually in the parts of your body farthest from your brain, your hands and feet. Flip off a switch in your small blood vessels. Normally your body automatically regulates flow of nutrients into your small blood vessels. They sort of work on back-up (like a generator for when the power goes out) so they can function even when your big vessels might be experiencing problems. But high levels of glucose turn off that automatic regulation—and let a little high blood pressure make nicks and tears in the junctions between cells in your smaller blood vessels. This is like asking someone to use a sledgehammer to do the job of a jeweler's tool—it magnifies that effect and magnifies the size of the nick. Also contributing is omentum fat (belly fat), which doesn't just impede the insulin process; it doe Continue reading >>

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