diabetestalk.net

High Blood Sugar And Itchy Scalp

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

Itchy Scalp Long Term

Itchy Scalp Long Term

Looking for causative agents for chronic itching of scalp and spreading to various parts of body. Have type 2 diabetes, taking metformin 1000 mg per day, januvia 100,mg per day. Also have high blood pressure,gout, and taking meds for them. The Itch is.ca monster going from minor to full time itch. Using steroids foam, creams, ointment and several moisturizing creams. Erratic success with use of steroidsmuse of steroids start with hydrocortisone celebrate, to tricinolone to clobesterol creams and foam. Any suggestions for ruling out drug causative actions? Or complication of diabetes?thanks Id like to connect you with fellow members @marylou705 @1977lizzy @janice7 and @oston , who have all talked about itchy scalp and may have some experience and solutions to share with you. FarmerT what did your doctor suggest might be the cause? Did the itching start with the addition of a new medication or change in your environment? Doctor said laundry detergent is no. 1 cause. We changed detergent twice. The belt line itch receded considerably., no other cause except could be food or drugs. Three years ago it got bad enough to see dermatologist. Gave me steroids and three kinds of shampoo whichcontrolled it for two years, then started getting worse. Saw,anotherdermatologist who prescribed stronger steroid, and to use one of three ointments in order of severity. Now they have little impact and my scalp is very sensitive from the scratching, my neck area is tender. Thank you for your help. Some but been losing hair 10 to 40 stands aCray for last 20 years or more. So dont have much more, to lose. Thanks I DON'T KNOW IF THIS HAS ANY CONNECTIONS OR NOT BUT BEFORE I WAS DIAGNOSED A FEW YEARS AGO WITH CANCER I ITCHED THEY SAID THAT IS ONE SIGN DON'T KNOW IF THAT IS YOUR PROBLEM OR NOT. HO Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Diabetes Can Lead To Intense Itching

Question: Can intense itching be a side effect for someone with diabetes whose blood sugars are poorly controlled? Answer: Poorly controlled diabetes is one possible cause for unexplained itching. Exactly how diabetes causes itching isn't certain, but suggested causes include diabetic nerve root injury, metabolic abnormalities from widely fluctuating blood sugars, and dry skin. If this is the cause, it should improve with better efforts to lower the blood sugars. That said, there are many other causes for severe itching. Dry skin from eczema is a common cause that's fairly easy to treat with moisturizers and steroid cream/ointment. Cholestatic liver disease with high blood levels of bilirubin is another cause of severe itching. A normal set of liver enzyme tests will rule this out. Either a very slow or a very fast thyroid can cause itching, so be sure to check thyroid function. Severe chronic kidney failure can also cause itching from the buildup of toxins. High levels of circulating blood histamines from a tumor can cause itching, so be sure to check a blood histamine level. Folks who have a disorder called polycythemia vera may experience itching due to high circulating levels of histamine-producing mast cells. Certain cancers such as carcinoid syndrome or Hodgkin's/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma can cause extreme itching, so these need to be considered. Parasitic infections are another possible cause, especially after recent travel to endemic areas. Severe emotional stress/anxiety is one more interesting cause for unexplained itching I've encountered in my practice. Q: My blood pressure averages 120/60. I'm concerned about the bottom reading of 60 being too low. I seem to be rather drained, and wonder if it's because my pressure is too low. Is there any food or vitamin I ca Continue reading >>

4 Physical Signs Of High Blood Sugar Level Every Diabetic Should Know!

4 Physical Signs Of High Blood Sugar Level Every Diabetic Should Know!

/ 4 physical signs of high blood sugar level every diabetic should know! 4 physical signs of high blood sugar level every diabetic should know! Did you know that itchy scalp could be a sign that your blood sugar level is really high? Read for more such symptoms. Tania Tarafdar | Updated: May 11, 2016 11:28 am Many people who are newly diagnosed with diabetes are surprised as the condition often occurs without obvious symptoms. But once you are diagnosed with it, you need to regularly check for the symptoms and severity of the condition as it may go out of hand and even become fatal. So whenever you notice changes in these areas consult your doctor immediately says, diabetologist Dr. Swapnil Ganeshpure. 1. Eyes: When your blood sugar level increase, the blood vessels in your eyes weaken, and there is a cholesterol deposit in the retina. Slowly, it blurs your vision and consequently leads to loss of vision, if left untreated. Visit a doctor immediately if you experience pain or burning in your eyes. Also, do an eye check up every six months and follow these eye care tips to ensure that your eyes are in good shape. 2. Skin: If you have been suffering from long-term diabetes , your skin could become very dry and itchy. It is because the high blood sugar provides a favourable condition for fungal growth, thereby increasing the risk of fungal infections and bacterial infections. You may also suffer from vaginitis and herpes if the infection spreads to the genitals. Elevated blood sugar can also impact the sweat glands which can lead to itching in the feet and scalp. Itchy scalp is also a sign of increased blood sugar levels. Try homeopathy to control diabetes. 3. Foot: Diabetics are extremely prone to conditions called diabetic foot. If you suffer from diabetes may not be ab Continue reading >>

Itchy Scalp: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Itchy Scalp: Causes, Symptoms And Diagnosis

Medically reviewed by George Krucik, MD, MBA An itchy scalp, or scalp pruritus, is a common problem that can cause frustrating symptoms, such as frequent scratching and discomfort. Sometimes itchy scalp is accompanied by visible signs, such as scabbed or flaking skin. Other times, your scalp... Read More An itchy scalp, or scalp pruritus, is a common problem that can cause frustrating symptoms, such as frequent scratching and discomfort. Sometimes itchy scalp is accompanied by visible signs, such as scabbed or flaking skin. Other times, your scalp can itch without any skin changes. Although itchy scalp doesnt typically indicate a severe medical concern, it can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition. The most common cause of itchy scalp is seborrheic dermatitis, better known as dandruff. In infants, the condition is called cradle cap. This type of dermatitis is most likely to occur in the areas of sebaceous or oil-secreting glands, including the scalp and face. If the glands become inflamed, you can experience: If your scalp itch doesnt go away in a few days and is accompanied by hair loss, pain, sores, or intense itching, see your doctor. Itchy scalp due to a fungal infection, lice, and some other conditions will not go away without medical treatment. In addition to a physical examination of your scalp, your doctor may take a scraping of your scalp. In a lab, skin cells can be tested for the presence of fungus, bacteria, or lice. However, most doctors can diagnose your itchy scalp through a careful examination and medical history. Treatment for itchy scalp depends upon its causes. For example, dandruff is treated through frequent hair washing with special topical agents. Each scalp medication works in a unique way, such as reducing oil on the scalp or killing Continue reading >>

Skin Problems In Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s important to be aware of potentially serious skin problems related to the disease and see your doctor before the problem gets out of control. In most cases, skin problems in diabetes can be managed with early diagnosis and treatment. you might like Scleroderma diabeticorum: While rare, this skin problem affects people with type 2 diabetes, causing a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. The treatment is to bring your blood sugar level under control. Lotions and moisturizers may help soften skin. Vitiligo: Vitiligo, a skin problem more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes, affects skin coloration. With vitiligo, the special cells that make pigment (the substance that controls skin color) are destroyed, resulting in patches of discolored skin. Vitiligo often affects the chest and abdomen, but may be found on the face around the mouth, nostrils, and eyes. Current treatment options for vitiligo include topical steroids and micropigmentation (tattooing). If you have vitiligo, you should use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn on the discolored skin. Acanthosis nigricans. This is a skin problem that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes tan or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like small warts, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. While there is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, losing weight may improve the skin condition. Acant Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Itchy Skin | No 8 Of 10 Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes

Early Symptoms Type 2 Diabetes – Skin Changes Diabetes itchy skin symptoms are often overlooked and not seen as early Type 2 diabetes symptoms since skin changes are sometimes considered to be normal. Itchy skin, particularly in the lower legs, can be caused by dryness, poor circulation, or yeast infections. Itching skin can also be called pruritus. The nerve damage caused by diabetes, called diabetic neuropathy, may stop diabetics from sweating. Decreased sweating can lead to dry skin. Poor blood flow, a common complication of diabetes can contribute to dry and itchy skin. Circulation problems that restrict blood flow to the legs and feet slow healing of the skin. High blood sugar causes the body to lose fluid. This occurs because the body is turning the water into urine to remove the excess sugar from the blood. The diabetes symptoms of frequent urination as well as dry and itchy skin are a result of this process. Dry skin can become itchy and can crack, causing you to scratch. Breaks in the skin allow germs to enter and cause infection. This can become a vicious cycle with skin that never heals properly. Since the skin is the largest organ in the body, it is important for your health and comfort to take care of your skin and take symptoms seriously. ‘ Prevent Skin Irritation Having healthy skin requires caring for its environment both inside and out. The most important thing you can do is regulate blood sugar levels in the normal range to prevent the symptoms and complications of diabetes. From the outside in, you can bathe or shower in warm water that is not too hot. This will help prevent dry and itchy skin. Use gentle cleansers or soaps and when you dry off – be gentle. Don’t rub your skin dry, just pat. Consider adding moisture to the air in your home wit Continue reading >>

What Is The Link Between Diabetes And An Itchy Scalp?

What Is The Link Between Diabetes And An Itchy Scalp?

What Is the Link Between Diabetes and an Itchy Scalp? People with diabetes are more susceptible to skin conditions, including ones of the scalp, because having diabetes raises the risk for developing all kinds of infections, explains WebMD. Ringworm is a type of fungal infection that causes ring-shaped patches of scaly skin that itch and sometimes form blisters. Common areas for ringworm infection include the scalp, feet, groin, stomach and chest. Severe cases of ringworm on the scalp cause extreme inflammation that has the potential to leave scars or cause permanent hair loss. This condition is highly contagious, and treatment requires antifungal oral medications or shampoos, states Mayo Clinic. A type of fungi called dermatophytes is responsible for ringworm. This fungus attacks the outer layer of skin on the scalp. Ringworm spreads by human-to-human contact, object-to-human contact and animal-to-human contact. Dogs and cats, especially young ones, are common carriers of the fungi, notes Mayo Clinic. Other types of animals that are known to carry ringworm include cows, goats, pigs and horses. One in three people with diabetes have a skin condition, as of 2015. When a person with diabetes develops a skin condition, it is important to treat it aggressively in order to avoid more serious health complications, says WebMD. Continue reading >>

The Itchy Scalp - Scratching For An Explanation

The Itchy Scalp - Scratching For An Explanation

The Itchy scalp - scratching for an explanation 1Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 2Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America 3Department of Dermatology/Center for Drug Design, University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America 2Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America 4Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America 1Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 2Department of Dermatology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America 3Department of Dermatology/Center for Drug Design, University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States of America 4Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States of America Correspondent Author: Gil Yosipovitch, Departments of Dermatology, and Neurobiology and Anatomy. Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA. Phone (336) 716-2901, Fax (336) 716-7732, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Exp Dermatol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Scalp pruritus is a common complaint that is considered a diagnostically and therapeutically challenging situation. Scalp skin has a unique neural structure that contains densely innervated hair foll Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Skin

Diabetes And Your Skin

Want another reason to get your blood sugar levels under control and keep them that way? Doing so can help you avoid many diabetes skin problems. Still, skin conditions related to this disease are common. As many as 1 out of 3 people with diabetes will have one. Fortunately, most can be or successfully treated before they turn into a serious problem. The key is to catch them early. Common Skin Conditions Linked to Diabetes Itching skin, also called pruritus, can have many causes, such as dry skin, poor blood flow, or a yeast infection. When itching is caused by poor blood flow, you’ll likely feel it in your lower legs and feet. Lotion can help to keep your skin soft and moist, and prevent itching due to dry skin. Bacterial infections: Staphylococcus skin infections are more common and more serious in people with poorly controlled diabetes. When hair follicles are irritated, these bacteria can cause boils or an inflamed bump. Other infections include: Styes, which are infections of the eyelid glands Nail infections Most bacterial infections need to be treated with antibiotic pills. Talk with your doctor. Fungal infections: Warm, moist folds of the skin are the perfect breeding ground for these infections. Three common fungal infections are: Jock itch (red, itchy area on the genitals and the inside of the thighs) Athlete's foot (affects the skin between the toes) Ringworm (ring-shaped, scaly patches that can itch or blister and appear on the feet, groin, chest, stomach, scalp, or nails). A yeast-like fungus called "Candida albicans" causes many of the fungal infections that happen to people with diabetes. Women are likely to get this in their vaginas. People also tend to get this infection on the corners of their mouth. It feels like small cuts and is called "angular ch Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Itchy Scalp! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Itchy Scalp! | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Morning all....does anyone else notice their scalp has become drier and itchy since being diagnosed? Is it the illness or metphormin? Its driving me crazy!! Could simply be a yeast infection, not helped by elevated blood sugar levels, perhaps? Yes, I had an itchy scalp through losing hair around the time of my diagnosis, in fact that's one of the reasons I went to GP My hair and scalp since then indicate the state of my health. If my BG levels are low and steady my hair is thick, wavy and shiny and the reverse is also true. I'm using a chemical free shampoo which seems to help with the dryness. Liz Earle (expensive) and Organic Surge ( cheaper) do good ones. You might give that a try, you will, of course, be trying to reduce your BG levels which is the biggest thing of course Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator Your not around children .. Are you .. have you ruled out nits .... Not saying it could be ..but rule out the most common causes first ... You could have a word with your pharmacist about any medication you are taking that could cause the itching... Keeping your blood sugars are in the normal range should help. Thanks for the replies...ive checked and its not nits...i recently had a check up with doc and BG is at a good level. I will certainly look into chemical free shampoos. Itch itch! I get this too, sometimes with stress I find or if I'm really tired. Haven't noticed a connection to my blood sugars though x Thanks for the replies...ive checked and its not nits...i recently had a check up with doc and BG is at a good level. I will certainly look into chemical free shampoos. Itch itch! Some people who have sensitive scalps use shampoos t Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Dandruff: How Your Diabetes Might Affect Your Scalp

Diabetes & Dandruff: How Your Diabetes Might Affect Your Scalp

This New Diabetes Drug May Also Aid in Weight Loss This is the ultimate no-nonsense, MD approved guide to get to the root of your blood sugar problem and change the way you live with diabetes. Today were GIVING it away 100% FREE! This ebook, valued at $36.95 is 100% FREE. No credit card required. Your Information is 100% Secure and Will Never Be Shared With Anyone. Copyright 2017 and Beyond. - Privacy Policy Where should we send your FREE Diabetes Recovery Guides? These books, valued at $47 are 100% FREE. No credit card required. Your Information is 100% Secure and Will Never Be Shared With Anyone. Diabetes & Dandruff: How Your Diabetes Might Affect Your Scalp Diabetes & Dandruff: How Your Diabetes Might Affect Your Scalp Hair loss isnt the only possible side effect of metabolic syndrome. Diabetes has many complications associated with it, some of them severe and others seemingly unrelated. One possible side effect is the development of dandruff or cradle cap, both of which may come from an overgrowth of yeast. Learn about this super spice that is CHANGING PEOPLES LIVES Dandruff has several potential causes, the two most common being an overgrowth of yeast and dryness. Yeast can cause buildup to develop on your scalp (similar to cradle cap seen in babies) while dryness caused by poor circulation and slow immune response can lead to flaky white skin and an itchy scalp. Dandruff treatment usually comes in the form of a special shampoo or conditioner but is just as often ineffective because it fails to treat the root cause and tries to treat the symptoms, instead. Some men and women have success using prescription-strength shampoo while others address their issues with diet. If diabetes is the root cause of your dandruff, a multifaceted approach is required. If your diabe Continue reading >>

Sugar Sensitivity: Itchy Skin

Sugar Sensitivity: Itchy Skin

The term sugar sensitivity is a catch-all phrase for a number of medical situations. This sensitivity might be a food allergy or a physical reaction to increased blood sugar levels. If eating refined sugar products causes your skin to itch, the most likely scenario is an allergic reaction. Refined sugar may also be a trigger for a chronic skin conditions, such as eczema. Only your doctor can properly diagnose your situation and determine the basis for your sugar sensitivity and resulting itchy skin. Video of the Day A food allergy is an abnormal reaction by the immune system to a food. When some substances enter or come in contact with the body, the immune system erroneously detects harm. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, true food allergies are not that common. What some people deem to be an allergy may actually be an intolerant to a food. Intolerance is not an immune system response. It is a difficulty digesting or processing a food type, such a sugar. Symptoms of a true food allergy include hives, swelling, itching skin or a skin rash. Some food allergies may trigger chronic skin conditions like eczema. Eczema is a chronic skin condition that causes patches of extremely dry skin to itch, crack and blister. The exact origin of eczema is unknown; however, heredity may play a role. Irritants may trigger an eczema outbreak. Exposure to cigarette smoke, detergents, harsh weather or wool clothing may start to irritate skin. The University of Maryland Medical Center recommends individuals diagnosed with eczema avoid food triggers as well, one of which may be refined sugar. It is possible sensitivity to sugar may cause an outbreak of eczema. You should see your doctor to determine if your itchy skin is actually eczema. Your chronically dry skin may not Continue reading >>

More in diabetes