diabetestalk.net

High Blood Sugar After Gallbladder Removal

Gall Bladder Surgery And Diabetes

Gall Bladder Surgery And Diabetes

I'm scheduled to enter the hospital on Monday (Mar. 1) for testing prior to having my gall bladder removed on Mar. 2. I guess I was misinformed about life after gall bladder removal! I thought that I would be able to eat almost everything without tummy problems. Apparently this isn't the case! In addition to no spicy foods (I LOVE spicy foods, within limits), it seems I won't be able to eat cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower as well! That's crazy! Those are great veggies!! What I just read in my browser is that I won't be able to eat much of what I like. In addition to all of this, I'm wondering if there's another way especially since I'm also a diabetic! I feel pretty good right now, although two weeks ago, i was having some problems; pain, bloating, indigestion. After 10 days of antibiotics and a very careful diet, I feel great now. How does gall bladder removal affect a diabetic? If i just control my diet and eat really good stuff, like I have been during the last month or so, can I avoid having surgery?? I'd do just about ANYTHING to avoid surgery!! [FONT="Georgia"][COLOR="RoyalBlue"]Arlene Meds:Humalog Mix50 - 50 units 1X before breakfast D.D. Family Getting much harder to control First off dont believe all you read on the net. I have all that stuff and had mine out about 3 yrs ago. The first month maybe I had to back off a bit but believe me I have the hottest chili, all the foods you listed and I have no issues at all on that. It also depends on how bad your gallbladder is before you need to have it out, mine was extreme pain and my wife was throwing up daily ours had to come out we could not stand it. Yes we changed our diet to avoid all those things, still needed it out but good luck whatever route you take. Hi...thanks for this. They told me 15 years ago that it Continue reading >>

Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis

What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a large gland in the abdomen located behind the stomach and next to the upper part of the small intestine (the duodenum). The pancreas has two main jobs: It discharges powerful digestive enzymes into the small intestine to aid the digestion of carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. It releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These hormones are involved in blood glucose (sugar) metabolism, regulating how the body stores and uses food for energy. What is pancreatitis? Pancreatitis is a rare disease in which the pancreas becomes inflamed. Pancreatic damage occurs when the digestive enzymes are activated and begin attacking the pancreas. In very severe cases, pancreatitis can result in bleeding into the gland, serious tissue damage, infection, and cyst formation. Severe pancreatitis can also cause damage if enzymes and toxins are released into the bloodstream, which can harm other vital organs such as the heart, lungs, and kidneys. Pancreatitis develops gradually and tends to become progressively worse. There are two forms of pancreatitis: acute and chronic. What causes pancreatitis? Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas that occurs over a short period of time. In more than 80% of the cases, acute pancreatitis is caused by bile duct stones or heavy alcohol use. Other causes include: Medications High triglyceride levels Infections Trauma Metabolic disorders Surgery In about 10-15% of the cases, the cause of acute pancreatitis is unknown. The severity of acute pancreatitis may range from mild abdominal (belly) discomfort to a severe, life-threatening illness. However, the majority of patients with acute pancreatitis (greater than 80%) recover completely after receiving the appropriate treatment. Ch Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Surgery And Blood Sugar Issues

Gallbladder Surgery And Blood Sugar Issues

Gallbladder surgery and blood sugar issues HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Diabetes > Gallbladder surgery and blood sugar issues Has anyone had a gall bladder surgery, or there digestive surgeries and then afterwards have problems with blood sugars - in my case, they drop too low, and I never had this problem until after I had the gall bladder surgery... (Am moving this post here for Gary to help keep it all in one thread ~Jeannie, Forum Moderator) I seem to have hypoglycemia, but I never had this problem until after I had gall bladder surgery - then all of a sudden, I had sugar issues where they always drop too low. So I have a meter, and monitor the levels from time to time. One thing that puzzles me, is I can take a reading before I eat, have supper for instance, and then shortly after I eat, the reading is lower than it was before I ate. How is this possible. This usually happens at supper time, I seem to manage the sugar levels quite fine throughout the day, it is just late afternoon that it tends to drop, even though I have snacks, etc. And it is the supper time reading that is lower after I eat then before I eat.. Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

Gallbladder Problems And Diabetes

For reasons that aren’t fully understood, people with diabetes have more gallstone problems than people in the general population. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: What’s the Connection? The evidence that people with diabetes are at greater risk of gallstones is clear, but “we still don’t know why,” says Armand A. Krikorian, MD, an endocrinologist at University Hospitals Case Medical Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland. Perhaps it’s because people with diabetes are generally overweight, and obesity is linked to gallstone disease. People with diabetes have higher levels of triglycerides — a type of fat — and it’s theorized that the triglycerides themselves encourage gallstone formation. Another theory is that stones form because of what is called autonomic neuropathy, or damage from diabetes to the involuntary nerves that control movement of the bowels and gallbladder. According to this line of thought, the bile stored in the gallbladder is not released efficiently because the nerves are damaged, and gallstones form from the resulting sludge. Also, recent research on insulin-resistant mice shows that FOXO1, a specific protein involved with diabetes, increases the amount of cholesterol that enters the bile, which may lead to the formation of gallstones. Cholesterol is a major component of most gallstones. Diabetes and Gallbladder Problems: Know the Symptoms Dr. Krikorian says that for a person living with diabetes, controlling the diabetes is the way to head off gallbladder problems. When diabetes is under control, it's much less likely that autonomic neuropathy will become an issue, and your triglyceride levels will be lower — thus decreasing your odds of developing gallsto Continue reading >>

A1c You Later, Diabetic Meds!

A1c You Later, Diabetic Meds!

I had the greatest thing happen the other day. I got taken off my diabetic medication! And I owe it all to my (late) gallbladder. Let me start out by saying that a gallbladder problem is the LEAST sexy affliction one can get as the ravages of middle age take hold. (Middle age does go up to 80, doesn’t it?) So, just like a flashback in the movies, only a whole lot less interesting, here’s the backstory. About a year ago, I had my first full-fledged gallbladder attack. Like someone first kicked me in the stomach and then fell on top of me and wouldn’t get off. For days. It didn’t occur to me until just this week that by the time one suffers a gallbladder attack, one already pretty much has gall stones that have been there a while. And, thanks to the omnipresent Internet, I found out that brewing gallbladder problems can and do affect blood sugar levels. We didn’t know about the gallbladder issue yet when my internist put me on a low dose of metformin/glyburide after my A1C started to rise following a four-year remission of my diabetic symptoms following weight loss surgery. OK, I thought, I got a four-year reprieve from medication. What did I want, egg in my beer? Fast-forward to the summer of 2015, a time that saw me taking my medication but watching my glucose level go all over the place. While I was used to being well within the normal range, I started to see numbers approaching 200 the same week I would crash and run for the orange juice. That’s when I scheduled the gallbladder surgery. I had this bright idea that since my surgeon (now my friend and writing partner) would be going into the same place as my previous lap band surgery, wouldn’t it make sense to get rid of that band and convert to the newer gastric sleeve procedure at the same time so that m Continue reading >>

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal

Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal January 30, 2018 by Stan Pak in Treatment Maintaining A Diabetic Diet After Gallbladder Removal If you are a diabetic patient who has had their gallbladder removed, you will find that the post-cholecystectomy recommended diet and diabetic diet are quite similar and complimentary. Gallstones and cholecystitis, (inflamed gallbladder) are very common problems for people with diabetes. This is because diabetes and obesity are known risk factors for gallbladder disease . The low-fat diet which is typically prescribed for diabetic patients suffering from gallstones will also be the best to maintain after surgery. What Is The Gallbladder And What Does It Do? The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped pouch which stores and concentrates the bile created by the liver. The food we eat and the fat content within it triggers release of specific amounts of bile from the gallbladder, into the small intestine for efficient breakdown and absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins. After gallbladder removal surgery, the liver will continue to produce bile however it will continually enter the intestine in a thin trickle and digestion of high fat meals or fried food becomes problematic, leading to pain, bloating, gas, nausea and diarrhea in many cases. What Diet To Use After Gallbladder Surgery Many patients whether diabetic or not will be much more comfortable sticking with this diabetic diet post procedure. Healthy fats only in very small quantities will be more easily digested with fewer symptoms. Choose Coconut oil which is MOSTLY made up of medium chain fatty acids (MCFA) and causes the least amount of trouble as it does not require bile to emulsify it. Choose olive oil instead of butter and consider having fish in leu of red meat Continue reading >>

No Gallbladder?? Issues??

No Gallbladder?? Issues??

You are here: Home Forums Welcome to the BSD No gallbladder?? Issues?? I just read people without a gallbladder have to have a low fat diet and thats why I am having tummy issues due to the higher fat percentage of the diet. Hi HappyLife, I havent had a gallbladder for 30 years or so, and have never had tummy issues. In between diets, I consumed the highest fat, junk-filled diet possible. Im sure it depends on the individual; Ive always thought I had a cast iron stomach. Nonnie, you are so lucky. Another friend told me tonight she has lots of trouble with too many fats also. I am patient so hoping my tummy figures it all out. Hi happyLife, I also have no gallbladder and have no problem with the extra fat. However prior to having mine removed I did lots of reading and discovered that many people have problems with fats. I was prepared to have problems but I have been lucky. Maybe try fats in smaller amounts across the day and see does that help. Good luck Thanks so much for your kind words and thoughts about what might help. I actually decided to try that starting tomorrow as I have been eating cheese for one meals protein since I am a pescatarian (only eat fish and no meat or chicken) and realized I should switch that meal out for fish or shrimp or something lower in fat than cheese Fingers crossed it helps. I have a long trip starting next Wednesday so dont want tummy issues. Hi Happy! I also have no gallbladder and Ive been ok. The surgeon explained it to me. Usually our liver will create bile, and then our gallbladder stores it. When we eat fat it secretes the bile to help digest the fat. When we dont have a gall bladder the only bile is whatever the liver can produce on the go, none is stored. Some will be lucky and the liver can keep up, others maybe not so lucky. Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Surgery And Type 1 Diabetes

Gallbladder Surgery And Type 1 Diabetes

As many of you know, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes as an adult. I have only been a Type 1, insulin pump wearing, cgm stylin', diabetic for just over a year. Anyway, about 4 days ago, I started having terrible pain in my upper stomach that was radiating to my chest. I seriously thought I was having a heart attack. On Sunday, I decided it was time to go to the ER. They did an ultrasound and said I have gallstones and need my gallbladder out. Has anyone else dealt with gallbladder surgery as a type 1 diabetic? What kind of surgery did you have? If you had laproscopic did they make you stay overnight since you were diabetic? If you are on a pump, how was your diabetes managed? Please help! I see the surgeon today at 11:30. (Today is my birthday by the way....Happy Birthday....you're gallbladder needs removed!) Any tips, advice, and information would be so greatly appreciated!!! And please read the wonderful TuDs Emily Coles discussion/reply dated January 15th 2014 titled "Hospital care for T1s: It aint pretty. Get your endo team involved as well. What hospital affiliation do they have, is the surgery going to be at that hospital? Will they help manage your D care and interact with the anesthesiologist? A lot has to do with hospital policy on pumps CGMs etc but getting your D team as an active participant if surgery is needed can be huge. I got my T1 diagnosis a number of years after having my gallbladder removed, so I can't help with any questions on how to manage BG with surgery. Will leave others to give you advice on that. As far as gallbladder surgery itself, it's usually done via laproscopy and is outpatient. It's much better to elect to have it done when you're feeling well (vs when you're in the middle of an attack and everything is inflamed.) My hospital roo Continue reading >>

The Best Diet After Gallbladder Removal: Everything You Need To Know Explained In Plain English

The Best Diet After Gallbladder Removal: Everything You Need To Know Explained In Plain English

The Best Diet After Gallbladder Removal: Everything You Need to Know Explained in Plain English If youve had your gallbladder removed, youve likely been advised to change your diet. To do so, its helpful to know what the gallbladder does and the role it plays in digestion. This article will help you better understand the gallbladder and the best diet to follow after its removal. The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ that lives next to the liver. Its job is to store and concentrate bile, a liquid produced by the liver. Bile assists with the breakdown of food products, particularly fats. When fat is eaten, the gallbladder contracts to release bile into the small intestine to aid digestion. The presence of gallstones (cholelithiasis) is one of the most common reasons a person has their gallbladder removed. More often than not, gallstones dont cause any problems. In fact, some people may be completely unaware they are even there. Sometimes, however, a stone can block the passage of bile out of the gallbladder. This is called cholecystitis and leads to pain (usually in the upper right part of the abdomen), inflammation and sometimes an infection. Summary: The gallbladder stores bile and releases it into the small intestine when food is eaten. Gallstones, which can cause abdominal pain, are a common reason for gallbladder removal. Symptoms after Gallbladder Removal (Cholecystectomy) Cholecystectomy involves the surgical removal of the gallbladder. Some common symptoms after cholecystectomy are indigestion, abdominal pain and nausea. Patients also often report bloating or wind. Studies have shown that people who eat more fat and protein and less vegetables report these symptoms more often ( 1 , 2 ). Issues with stool (poop) is also common because of the extra bile pre Continue reading >>

Things You Must Know If You Dont Have A Gallbladder

Things You Must Know If You Dont Have A Gallbladder

Removal of the gallbladder is one of the most common surgeries performed in the USA and Australia today. Gallstones are incredibly common and they occur in 10 to 15 percent of the population. The problem does tend to run in families. Women are more likely to experience gallbladder problems than men and this is partly due to the effects of the female hormone estrogen. A gallbladder performs several important roles in your body: Enables absorption of fat soluble antioxidants and vitamins A, E, D and K Assists the removal of cholesterol from your body Assists the removal of toxins that have been broken down by the liver Obviously you can survive without a gallbladder, but you are more prone to developing certain health problems. In particular you are at greater risk of developing a fatty liver, experiencing indigestion and developing deficiencies of essential fatty acids and fat soluble nutrients What happens when you dont have a gallbladder? Your liver continues to manufacture bile, but there is no longer a place to store it or concentrate it. Therefore bile continually slowly trickles into the intestines. If you eat a fatty meal, you will not be able to secrete a large enough amount of bile into your intestines, therefore the fat will be poorly digested. This means many people experience diarrhea, bloating, nausea or indigestion. Not digesting fat well means you will not be able to digest essential fatty acids, including omega 3 and omega 6 fats. It also means youll have a hard time absorbing fat soluble vitamins such as vitamins D, E, A and K. A lot of the antioxidants in vegetables are fat soluble: lycopene, lutein and carotenoids are all fat soluble. If you dont produce adequate bile, you will not be adequately absorbing these life saving compounds from foods. If you Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Can Fluctuate For Many Reasons

Blood Sugar Levels Can Fluctuate For Many Reasons

Blood sugar levels can fluctuate for many reasons Answers from Sara J. Carlson, R.N., C.D.E. Several factors can contribute to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, some medications, and skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. In addition, illness, injury, surgery, stress, menses and menopause, can influence blood sugar levels. Physical or emotional stress triggers the release of hormones that can cause high blood sugar levels. For women, menstruation and menopause cause hormonal changes that affect blood sugar levels. Regular blood sugar testing will expose patterns and help you and your health care team to control your diabetes. If you experience persistent hyperglycemia, talk with your team about adjusting your diabetes treatment. Carlson S (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 8, 2018. Factors affecting blood glucose. American Diabetes Association. Accessed May 8, 2018. Women and diabetes: Frequently asked questions. American Diabetes Association. Accessed May 8, 2018. Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Removal - Diabetes Connection Question

Gallbladder Removal - Diabetes Connection Question

Gallbladder removal - diabetes connection question Here's another possibility. When I used to belong to Weight Watchers online there were dozens of stories about how people had to have their gall bladders removed after losing large amounts of weight, especially if that involved repeated dieting. That would be me, also. I'm thinking that many people who will eventually be diagnosed diabetic have struggled with their weight for a long time, and that might be at the origin of a link between gall bladder disease and diabetes, if in fact there is a link. Low-fat eating - especially cycling in and out of low-fat eating which is what most "dieters" end up doing - can destroy the gall bladder. It's job is to produce and secrete bile when one eats fat. When little to no fat is eaten, the bile just sits there. After a while it crystallizes. Then, when on again eats fat, the poor thing contracts attempting to do its job. With the bile crystallized inside it, this results in nothing but extreme pain. Eventually, the now disabled gall bladder must be removed. Becuase the actual event (the pain) happens upon eating fat, many mistakenly believe that the fat is causing the problem. The truth is quite the opposite. Huge increase in gall bladder surgeries - just another casualty of the lipophobia hysteria of the last 50 years. Low-fat eating - especially cycling in and out of low-fat eating which is what most "dieters" end up doing - can destroy the gall bladder. It's job is to produce and secrete bile when one eats fat. When little to no fat is eaten, the bile just sits there. After a while it crystallizes. Then, when on again eats fat, the poor thing contracts attempting to do its job. With the bile crystallized inside it, this results in nothing but extreme pain. Eventually, the now Continue reading >>

Can Gallstones Cause High Blood Sugar Levels?

Can Gallstones Cause High Blood Sugar Levels?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Sue Can Gallstones Cause High Blood Sugar Levels? Answer Hi Sue, As I found out, they sure do!! I had high blood sugars for a year before they figured out I needed my gallbladder out. The irony was that they could not get my blood sugar down to do the surgery and the doc finally said, “can’t wait, this needs out now!” He commented that he bet the number would drop as soon as the gallbladder was out. He was right! 30 minutes after surgery, the blood sugar started to decline after 3 days of hellacious numbers. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

High Pulse After Gallbladder Removal

High Pulse After Gallbladder Removal

My mom is 65 years old and had her gallbladder removed with a laparoscopy surgery. She is being kept in the hospital for four days now due to the fact she had not eliminated the gas until now. The doctors told us after this she will get better and will be able to go home. Her pulse got really high yesterday up to 160, the doctors are telling us it's just an anxiety attack. I'm afraid something is wrong.. Can anyone help and maybe let us know if this is normal? I should probably mention that she barely ate some vegetables soup in these 4 days. Hi, Maddiem, sorry to learn your Mom is having these troubles. Was she given painkillers containing codeine in the hospital? That could have suppressed her appetite, and slowed down her digestive system. Surgery, even key hole surgery is a shock to the body, and it may be taking her a while to recover, especially if she was ill with gallbladder problems before. Her recovery might take some time, longer than her doctors predict for her to recover; as people age, it takes them longer to get better than it would say, someone who was thirty or forty years old. So, I think it might help if when she gets home she could keep to a very light, low fat diet, with small frequent meals. Each individual recovers differently, but I think she might need frequent rest breaks, do a bit of activity, if she can. Take care, and best of luck. Let us know how things are doing! I had gall bladder removal too by laparascopic surgery. Right after I went out from tecovery room the nurses we're insisted me to push my self to stand and walk step by step in order to pass some gases in my stomach. After few hours I started to do it and I made to pass some gases. I never experienced high pulse rate on the first week after post surgery. The high pulses I've expe Continue reading >>

Gallbladder Removal By Laparoscopy (laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)

Gallbladder Removal By Laparoscopy (laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)

What was the least helpful aspect of this article? There is missing or inacurate information Please let us know what information is missing or inaccurate.(Optional) To verify that you are a real person, DoveMed requires each survey to be answered while logged in. Gallbladder Removal by Laparoscopy (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy) Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, performed for various reasons; the most common reason being symptomatic gallstones. What are the other Names for the Procedure? Removal of Gallbladder with Video Assistance What is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy surgical procedure? Gallbladder Removal by Laparoscopy (or Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy) is the surgical removal of the gallbladder, performed for various reasons; the most common reason being symptomatic gallstones. What part of the Body does the Procedure involve? Gallbladder Removal by Laparoscopy involves the following: Cystic duct (a tube-like structure that comes off of the gallbladder) Cystic artery (a blood vessel that carries blood to the gallbladder) Why is the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy surgical procedure Performed? The most common indication for performing a Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy is symptomatic gallstones causing pain (biliary colic). Other indications include: Acute cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder that commonly occurs due to gallstones Choledocholithiasis: A condition, wherein the gallstone travels out of the gallbladder and blocks the common bile duct, preventing the flow of bile into the small bowel. In a majority of the cases, the stone in the duct is addressed first, prior to gallbladder removal Gallstone pancreatitis: A condition, wherein the stone travels out of the gallbladder and blocks the pancreatic duct. The pancreatitis Continue reading >>

More in diabetes