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High Blood Sugar After Flu Shot

Type 2 Diabetes And Flu: Does Illness Influence Blood Sugar Levels?

Type 2 Diabetes And Flu: Does Illness Influence Blood Sugar Levels?

Nobody likes getting sick. Cos' let's face it, there are few things more miserable than being confined to a bed or couch struggling to breathe and carry out daily activities. And unfortunately, diabetes increases risk of illness of many kinds, including the flu. The reason this happens is because elevated blood sugar levels weaken the immune system, making it more susceptible to infection. And on the opposite side, infections raise blood sugar levels because as the immune system is mounting it’s attack, it needs energy to fight infection. So catching the flu can result in a bit of a vicious cycle. What is the Flu? Influenza is a viral infection that affects millions of people each year. It is a notoriously contagious respiratory illness that commonly infects the nose, throat and lungs. It spreads from person to person through droplets expectorated when people cough, sneeze or talk. Additionally, if these small droplets are on surfaces (counters, handles etc), people can touch them, then touch their face and infect themselves. People may be infected and infect others before they even know they’re sick and even after they’ve begun feeling better. Generally people are contagious for about a week, though this obviously will vary depending on the person. Once a person is infected, symptoms show up within 1-4 days. Symptoms of influenza Please note, not everyone will get all of these symptoms and some of them can be symptoms of other disease. If you have any of these signs, you should schedule a doctor’s visit for proper diagnosis. Symptoms of influenza include: Fever/chills Cough Sore throat Runny nose Body aches Headaches Fatigue Flushed skin Vomiting and diarrhea Complications of influenza Complications of influenza can include: Pneumonia Ear infections Sinus Infec Continue reading >>

4 Surprising Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

4 Surprising Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Managing diabetes means being prepared for unexpected blood sugar changes. Certain foods and drinks are often to blame, but not always. Seemingly simple facts of everyday life can sometimes kick your sugar out of whack, too. Stress. When you're under stress, certain hormones send nutrients, including sugar, into the bloodstream to prepare your body for action. For people with diabetes, that stress response can equal a spike in blood sugar. It can also trigger poor eating habits, whether it's eating too little or eating too much. Do you suspect stress raises your blood sugar? Every time you check your sugar for the next 2 weeks, rate your stress on a scale from one to 10 and write down both your rating and your blood sugar. If you see a connection between the two, it's time to manage your stress. "Find some time that's just yours. Take a walk, ride a bike, or take regular breaks to unwind," says Linda M. Siminerio, RN, PhD, CDE. She's the director of the University of Pittsburgh Diabetes Institute. Tossing and Turning. "Sleep disorders, lack of sleep, and interrupted sleep can raise blood sugars," says Pamela Allweiss, MD, MPH. She's a medical officer in the division of diabetes translation at the CDC. People with diabetes who have trouble falling asleep or who wake up in the night several times a week have higher fasting blood sugar than those who get a better night's sleep. If you have insomnia, get it treated. Sick Days. Cold, flu, or any infection is a physical stress that can hike blood sugar just like mental stress. To top it off, the sugar and alcohol in some cold medicines can boost blood sugar, while the illness itself can kill your appetite and bring your levels down. When you're sick, check your blood sugar every 2 to 4 hours, and test your blood or urine for Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

SUNDAY, Oct. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people -- particularly those with diabetes -- to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. Immune system boost. As people age, their immune s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Flu Shot: Ask D'mine Looks At The Potential Link

Diabetes And The Flu Shot: Ask D'mine Looks At The Potential Link

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Yep, we're sticking with our fear theme for the month of October. Who's afraid of a big bad flu shot? You might be surprised! Only way to find out is to brave this edition of our weekly diabetes advice column, Ask D'Mine, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and community educator Wil Dubois. {Need help navigating life with diabetes? Email us at [email protected] } Nancy from Pennsylvania, type 1, writes: I was wondering if any other PWD has had this happen to them. I was diagnosed with Type 1 five years ago at the age of 48. The first two years of my diabetic life I received an annual flu shot. However, 2 years ago I started wearing an insulin pump. I went for my annual flu shot and within two weeks of getting my shot, my basal rate increased two-fold. Not Happy! I discussed this with my endo and she really had no explanation for this increase. This basal increase was permanent. I haven't gotten a flu shot since and my basal hasn't increased. I've had a consistent A1C of 5.8-6.0 so it's not like I don't take care of myself. Afraid to get the Flu shot again... [email protected] D'Mine answers: Yeah, I know: we talked about the flu shot here at Ask D'Mine just the other day . But this was so frickin' bizarre I just had to talk about it (no offense Nancy). First, I gotta say, I've never seen anything like this happen. I've never heard of anything like this happening. I even spent some time with my favorite search engine and couldn't find anyone else reporting anything like this. Well, there was this one guy, but he was also talking about his alien abduction experiences and his past life as Elvis, so I wasn't inclined t Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Key For People With Diabetes

(HealthDay)—With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people—particularly those with diabetes—to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can tax Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Due To Flu Jab?

High Blood Sugar Due To Flu Jab?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I had the flu jab 4 weeks ago and ever since then I have had high blood sugar, especially so between meals. I normally have to eat a snack mid-morning and mid-evening to prevent hypos but now my blood sugar is around 18mmol at these times no matter how much insulin I inject, so it's as if something is blocking the insulin. I wondered if this could be caused by something in the flu jab? I'm not taking any other medication or supplements. I hope someone can help. Thanks, Carol What type of insulin/meds are you on, and what is your daily dose? This might help shed some light on the situation? Also, what kind of things are you eating, have you changed it recently etc. Another thought, were you in honeymoon period and maybe now thats ended? I dont know about flu jab but I know someone whose bs was great until they had the flu and that ended their honeymoon period. Dont know the physiology of why this should be though. What you say sounds like insulin resistance but I dont know if this would make sense until you post what type? I haven't seen that pattern develop. I would have expected you to get over the flu jab within a week. You can get more insulin resistant in the winter though. Have you changed your exercise, eating or sleeping pattern? I'm on Novomix 30 twice a day. My usual dose used to be 8 in the morning and 8 in the evening but now I've been injecting 14 units twice a day but it makes no difference. I have changed the disposable pen since. I've been type 1 since July 2007 and I don't think I had a honeymoon period. I actually do eat a very good diet eg. brown rice, veg, seeded bread etc. and I don't drink. I haven't changed my eating habits o Continue reading >>

Flu & Diabetes | Risks & Advice | Flu Jabs | Dfaf

Flu & Diabetes | Risks & Advice | Flu Jabs | Dfaf

This section is intended for healthcare professionals and associated healthcare employees in the UK only this includes GPs, nurses, practice managers, GP practice administration support, pharmacists and pharmacy counter assistants. If you are not a healthcare professional or healthcare employee, you should not enter this section information regarding flu can be found on the main website. I AM A HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL OR ASSOCIATED EMPLOYEE I AM NOT A HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL OR ASSOCIATED EMPLOYEE While catching flu is never a pleasant experience, it can have more serious implications if you have a condition such as diabetes. If you have diabetes you are at greater risk of catching flu, as having diabetes makes it harder for your body to fight off the virus1. This applies to all types of diabetes (Type 1, Type 2 and diet-controlled diabetes)2. You are also at greater risk of developing complications such as pneumonia, as your body is under increased stress1. And for people with diabetes, having flu can also affect your blood sugar levels, increasing your risk of developing short-term complications such as ketoacidosis and hyperglycaemia1. So its important to test your blood sugar more regularly than normal if you do get flu1. If you catch or develop flu, its also worth considering that some over-the-counter medications contain high levels of sugar, which could affect your blood sugar management1. Your pharmacist will be able to advise you on which medications you should or shouldnt take. The flu viruses predominantly circulate during the winter. So you should think about how to help protect yourself as the flu season approaches. Vaccination is the most effective way to avoid developing the flu3, and if you have diabetes, you are eligible for a free flu vaccination on t Continue reading >>

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Should I Get A Flu Shot If I Have Diabetes?

Having type 1 or type 2 diabetes puts you at increased risk of illness because elevated blood sugar weakens the immune system. Getting an annual flu shot is the best way to protect yourself. Fall is here, and that means that along with pumpkins and hay rides, it’s influenza (flu) season—which can last until May. For those with diabetes, flu isn’t just a drag: It can result in hospitalization, and occasionally even death. Fortunately, a vaccine can slash your risk of the illness by an estimated 40-60%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The flu shot also lowers your chances of hospitalization, which is most common in flu patients with chronic conditions like diabetes. The vaccine can also “prevent major respiratory infections during the flu season,” says Kavita Seetharaman, MD, staff physician at Joslin Diabetes Center, a Boston-based non-profit affiliated with Harvard Medical School. Why Is the Flu So Dangerous for People with Diabetes? “As with any other infection, the flu virus can cause inflammation, congestion, and mucus production in the respiratory tract,” as well as cough, fever, and even breathing difficulties, Dr. Seetharaman says. But for diabetes patients, there’s another risk. “When patients with diabetes are not feeling well,” due to illness, infection, or injury, “they can become more insulin resistant. Blood sugar rises [even if patients aren’t eating], and ketones can develop,” she explains. Ketones are chemicals that are produced when there’s not enough glucose (sugar) to fuel the metabolism; the presence of ketones (which can be detected with over-the-counter test strips) indicate that the body is using fat for energy. Patients with diabetes can accumulate ketones in the blood, which can make Continue reading >>

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

Does The Flu Shot Affect Blood Sugar?

While most physicians will tell you that your blood glucose will not be impacted by a flu shot, anecdotally there are reports of increased blood sugar levels immediately post- injection. Does this mean you shouldn’t get a flu shot? Absolutely not. Your risk from contracting the flu is far greater than a brief period of elevated blood glucose. The Flu Shot Doctors say that diabetics should not take the nasal form of the flu vaccination, only the injection. The vaccine is made of killed flu viruses, and cannot give you the flu. The vaccine is between 70% and 90% effective, and takes about two weeks to provide full immunity. It is generally available sometime during September, and physicians urge diabetics to get it as early as possible so they have complete immunity when the season begins. Some people report higher-than-normal blood glucose readings immediately after their vaccination and for a week or two. Generally, these levels are not high enough to signify an emergency situation, i.e. hyperglycemia and all of its ramifications. There is no real explanation for this increase, other than a possible small bump to the metabolism as the body processes the vaccine. Being aware of the possibility, and adjusting insulin and diet to address the higher readings should be sufficient. If after a couple of weeks glucose levels don’t return to normal, consult your physician. Why Getting a Flu Shot is Critical for Diabetics According to the CDC, diabetics are three times more likely to be hospitalized for the flu and the complications it causes than the rest of the population. Diabetes weakens the immune system, making diabetics more susceptible to the flu, and more likely to develop complications. Doctors not only urge diabetics to get vaccinated, but also strongly recommend t Continue reading >>

Flu And People With Diabetes

Flu And People With Diabetes

People with diabetes (type 1 or type 2), even when well-managed, are at high risk of serious flu complications, often resulting in hospitalization and sometimes even death. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections and ear infections are examples of flu-related complications. The flu also can make chronic health problems, like diabetes, worse. This is because diabetes can make the immune system less able to fight infections. In addition, illness can make it harder to control your blood sugar. The illness might raise your sugar but sometimes people don’t feel like eating when they are sick, and this can cause blood sugar levels to fall. So it is important to follow the sick day guidelines for people with diabetes. Vaccination is the Best Protection against Flu CDC recommends that all people who are 6 months and older get a flu vaccine. It is especially important for people with diabetes to get a flu vaccine. Flu shots are approved for use in people with diabetes and other health conditions. The flu shot has a long, established safety record in people with diabetes. People with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia because of the flu, so being up to date with pneumococcal vaccination is also recommended. Pneumococcal vaccination should be part of a diabetes management plan. Talk to your doctor to find out which pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when coughing or sneezing and throw the tissue away after using it; Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after coughing or sneezing; Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth (germs are spread that way); and Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care. If you are sick with flu-like symptoms you should sta Continue reading >>

The Truth About Flu Shots

The Truth About Flu Shots

**Editors Note: This article is based on current recommendations and research from the CDC . We encourage everyone to consult their doctor whenmaking personal health decisions. I got my flu shot in a Target CVS this year. I went in to pick up my insulin from the pharmacy, and when the pharmacist asked if Id like to get a flu shot I agreed. Id been meaning to anyway. Within 2 minutes Id filled out the necessary paperwork and she gave me the injection. Unfortunately, she hit a vein when she took the needle out, blood was dripping down my arm right in the middle of a public area of Target. The pharmacist was embarrassed and worried that Id be upset, but with 15 years as a Type 1 diabetic under my belt, this felt like a pretty average day. I laughed, thanked her, and left with a $5 gift card. A win-win, because I know how important it is to get a flu shot as a T1D. No doubt, your healthcare professional has urged you to get a flu vaccine. In the United States, flu vaccines are recommended for everyone over 6 months old but if you have diabetes, getting vaccinated is especially important ( CDC ). Dr. Marina Basina, an endocrinologist at Stanford explains that If a person with diabetes gets the flu, it becomes much more difficult to manage blood sugars any infection will elevate blood sugars and increase variability in the readings and resistance to insulin. On the other hand, fevers, sweats and poor appetite may lead to low blood sugars, or ketone formation even in the setting of normal blood sugars. Furthermore, DKA is more frequent in the setting of flu even when blood sugars are not significantly elevated. Flu shots are a safe, inexpensive and effective way to lower your risk ofgetting sick. One study found that flu vaccination is associated with a 79% lower rate of hosp Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Flu

Diabetes And The Flu

Diabetes can turn a simple case of the flu into a serious problem. "People who have diabetes are three times more likely to be hospitalized if they get the flu," says Helena Duffy, CDE, a nurse practitioner at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. Diabetes can weaken your immune system and make it harder for your body to fight off the influenza virus, she says. The flu can affect your blood sugar levels. You're also at higher risk for pneumonia. And if you're not eating well while you're sick, you could be at risk for hypoglycemia. Get a Flu Shot for Prevention The best way to protect yourself is to get a flu shot at the beginning of every flu season. Avoid the nasal flu vaccine, which has not been extensively studied in people with diabetes (PWDs). Ask people living in your house to get a flu vaccine, too. PWDs also should get the pneumococcal vaccine to protect against pneumonia. If you have diabetes, ask your doctor about getting a second shot five to 10 years after the first. When You Have Diabetes and the Flu If you do get sick, ask your doctor about Tamiflu (oseltavimir), a prescription antiviral medication that can ease symptoms and shorten the duration of your illness. For best results, take it as soon as you notice symptoms. It's also important to pay close attention to your blood glucose levels. "Check your blood glucose every two to four hours, and record your readings," Duffy says. "If your blood sugar remains high or gets too low, call your doctor." Duffy says people with type 1 diabetes who feel ill and have a blood glucose reading over 250 mg/dl should test for ketones in the urine. Left untreated, excessive ketones can result in ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that occurs when fat is burned for energy instead of glucose. If you have the flu, do Continue reading >>

Flu Shot Is Key For People With Diabetes

Flu Shot Is Key For People With Diabetes

With predictions calling for a potentially bad flu season this year, doctors are urging people — particularly those with diabetes — to get vaccinated. Many people with diabetes don't get a seasonal flu shot each year, according to the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE). Some people with the blood sugar disease don't realize they're at risk for flu-related complications. Others have misguided fears that the shot will trigger an adverse reaction, the group explained. However, people with diabetes are more likely to develop serious flu-related health problems if they get the virus, the AADE cautioned. The group said the flu shot is a safe and effective way to prevent or reduce the severity of these complications. "Reducing risks is one of the AADE's seven key self-care behaviors for managing diabetes, and getting the flu shot every fall is an excellent way of reducing the risk of getting sick," certified diabetes educator Evan Sisson said in an AADE news release. "It's widely available, it takes just a few minutes and it can make a real difference in your health." Good hand hygiene is another important way to stay healthy and hopefully avoid the flu, the diabetes experts noted. There are several ways a seasonal flu shot can benefit people with diabetes, according to the AADE. They include: ♦ Better disease management. The flu and other infections can raise blood sugar levels and disrupt a healthy diet plan. Avoiding the flu can help people with diabetes stay on track and manage the condition. ♦ Complication prevention. People with diabetes are more likely to be hospitalized for flu-related complications, such as pneumonia. They are also more likely to die from the flu. ♦ Immune system boost. As people age, their immune system weakens. The flu can t Continue reading >>

Elevated Bg From Flu Shot?

Elevated Bg From Flu Shot?

I had been struggling with my BG for several weeks. I was so frustrated. Well I kept adjusting my basal rates and now have everything back to where they should be. Finally!!! Well now I'm puzzled. I changed my infusion set this morning. I went to the pharmacy to pick up more strips and my insulin. While there I had my flu shot. It wasn't planned. But now all afternoon my BG won't come below 130 even with corrections. Has anyone noticed that the flu shot will cause the rise that is very stubborn to come down? My arm is a little sore and I have to admit I do have the body aches. I'm thinking the elevation could be from the shot. But it makes me wonder if the infusion set maybe isn't in a "happy" place. Sorry you had probs with it Debbie. I had no increase in bg last year, but I know the vaccine is different each year, so who knows. I haven't had this year's yet, I had planned to go Saturday, but kinda got side-tracked and ended up going to buy a car instead I'll go this coming Saturday, and will keep a close check on bg. Sounds like you were coming down with something anyway, hope you feel better soon. Last edited by Mands; 9/28/09 at 12:02 AM. Reason: typos A1c December 06 6.3 March 06 6.2 June 07 5.7 Dec 07 5.8 June 08 5.6 Nov. 08 5.7 Jan 09 5.8 May 09 5.6 Aug 09 5.4 Feb 10 6.0 Sept 10 6.5 Feb 11 7.1 June 11 5.7 Nov 11 5.9 (41) Feb 12 6.1 (43) Aug 12 6.4 (46) Dec 12 5.8 (40.4) June 13 5.9 (41) January 14 6.1 (43) July 14 6.4 (46) Feb. 15 5.8 (40) Sept 15 6.8 (52) January 16 7.6% (60) April 16 7.0% (53) July 16 5.9% (41) Oct. 16 5.4% (36) I don't think I was coming down with anything. I felt fine prior to the flu shot. Last year was actually the first year I had no symptoms after getting the shot. I always get a sore arm, run a low grade fever and get the typical flu li Continue reading >>

Drugs To Prevent And Treat The Flu

Drugs To Prevent And Treat The Flu

Its that time of year again: flu season. If you havent gotten it already, you should be preparing to get your annual vaccine against influenza or, as it is usually called, the flu. The flu is a highly contagious respiratory illness that is caused by a virus. Symptoms of the flu include cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, body aches, headache, and fatigue, all of which can range from mild to severe. Often the flu is accompanied by fever, with its usual symptoms of alternating chills and uncomfortable warmth. While most flu symptoms involve the respiratory tract, vomiting and diarrhea can also occur; these symptoms are more common in children than adults. Most people recover from the flu within a few days to less than two weeks. However, some people develop serious and sometimes life-threatening complications from the flu. Such complications may include secondary infections such as pneumonia, bronchitis, and ear or sinus infections, or the worsening of a preexisting chronic condition such as asthma or congestive heart failure. If you have diabetes, you are considered at high risk for getting the flu and for developing complications, even if your blood glucose is well controlled. This is because diabetes can impair your immune systems ability to fight off an attacking virus such as the flu. Then, once you catch the flu, your body may respond negatively in several ways to the stress of being sick. During times of stress, the body releases stress hormones such as epinephrine (adrenaline) and cortisol, which raise your heart rate and blood pressure . Epinephrine along with glucagon, a hormone produced by alpha cells in the pancreas also causes the liver to release stored glucose, leading to elevated blood glucose levels in many people with diabetes. Being ill can also Continue reading >>

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