diabetestalk.net

High Blood Pressure Diabetes Diet Menu

High Blood Pressure Diet

High Blood Pressure Diet

If you have high blood pressure, it's best to eat meals low in saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, salt (sodium), and added sugars. This is, of course, good dietary advice for everyone, regardless of their blood pressure. Salt and High Blood Pressure Too much salt or sodium can cause your body to retain fluid, which increases blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, this is why your doctor will recommend limiting how much salt you eat to no more than about 1 teaspoon per day. Another rule to follow, according to the American Heart Association, is consuming 1,500 milligrams a day of salt if you have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease, or if you are African-American or 51 years of age or older. Healthy people can aim for 2,300 milligrams a day or less. To stay on track, choose low-sodium and no-added-salt foods and seasonings, and read nutrition facts labels carefully to determine the amount of sodium added to packaged and processed foods. Get Plenty of Potassium Since potassium helps balance the amount of sodium in your cells, not getting enough can lead to too much sodium in your blood. Hence, getting plenty of potassium can help prevent and control high blood pressure. Limit Alcohol Consumption Alcohol can raise your blood pressure, even if you don't have hypertension, so everyone should monitor alcoholic intake. Healthy women of all ages and men older than 65 should limit themselves to one drink a day, while men 65 and younger can stick to up to two drinks a day. Keep in mind that one drink is a 4 oz. glass of wine, 12 oz. beer, or a small amount of hard liquor (1.5 oz. of 80-proof spirits or 1 oz. of 100-proof spirits). Supplements and High Blood Pressure There’s no solid evidence that any supplement can help lower your blood pressure, but Continue reading >>

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

Dash Diet: Healthy Eating To Lower Your Blood Pressure

The DASH diet emphasizes portion size, eating a variety of foods and getting the right amount of nutrients. Discover how DASH can improve your health and lower your blood pressure. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is a lifelong approach to healthy eating that's designed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension). The DASH diet encourages you to reduce the sodium in your diet and eat a variety of foods rich in nutrients that help lower blood pressure, such as potassium, calcium and magnesium. By following the DASH diet, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure by a few points in just two weeks. Over time, your systolic blood pressure could drop by eight to 14 points, which can make a significant difference in your health risks. Because the DASH diet is a healthy way of eating, it offers health benefits besides just lowering blood pressure. The DASH diet is also in line with dietary recommendations to prevent osteoporosis, cancer, heart disease, stroke and diabetes. DASH diet: Sodium levels The DASH diet emphasizes vegetables, fruits and low-fat dairy foods — and moderate amounts of whole grains, fish, poultry and nuts. In addition to the standard DASH diet, there is also a lower sodium version of the diet. You can choose the version of the diet that meets your health needs: Standard DASH diet. You can consume up to 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. Lower sodium DASH diet. You can consume up to 1,500 mg of sodium a day. Both versions of the DASH diet aim to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet compared with what you might get in a typical American diet, which can amount to a whopping 3,400 mg of sodium a day or more. The standard DASH diet meets the recommendation from the Dietary Guidelines for Americ Continue reading >>

7-day Healthy Blood Pressure Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

7-day Healthy Blood Pressure Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 75 million American adults have high blood pressure (that's 1 in 3 adults). Some people may not even know they're included in this statistic, because this condition usually presents with no symptoms. Untreated, high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) can lead to heart attack and stroke. Fortunately, eating a balanced diet and leading an overall healthy lifestyle can help to keep blood pressure levels in check. The meals and snacks in this 7-day 1,200-calorie meal plan follow both the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating pattern and the American Heart Association recommendations for a heart-healthy diet. You'll find plenty of fiber-rich fruits, vegetables and whole grains, lean protein, low-fat dairy and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado. We included lots of high-potassium foods, such as cantaloupe, sweet potatoes and white beans, and seasoned dishes with just a little bit of salt—a combination that works together to keep blood pressure balanced. Lowering your blood pressure can sometimes be about more than just your diet. Talk to your doctor about adding in an exercise program and other healthy lifestyle factors (think: not smoking or decreasing daily stress). Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-Transpar Continue reading >>

7-day High-blood Pressure Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

7-day High-blood Pressure Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories

7-Day High-Blood Pressure Meal Plan: 1,500 Calories By:Victoria Seaver, M.S., R.D., C.D., Digital Meal Plan Editor According to the Centers for Disease Control, about 75 million American adults have high blood pressure (that's 1 in 3 adults). Some people may not even know they're included in this statistic, because this condition usually presents with no symptoms. Untreated, high blood pressure (also known as hypertension) can lead to heart attack and stroke. Fortunately, eating a balanced diet and leading an overall healthy lifestyle can help to keep blood pressure levels in check. The meals and snacks in this 7-day 1,500-calorie meal plan follow both the DASH diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating pattern and the American Heart Association recommendations for a heart-healthy diet. You'll find plenty of fiber-rich fruits, vegetables and whole grains, lean protein, low-fat dairy and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado. We included lots of high-potassium foods, such as cantaloupe, sweet potatoes and white beans, and seasoned dishes with just a little bit of salta combination that works together to keep blood pressure balanced. Lowering your blood pressure can sometimes be about more than just your diet. Talk to your doctor about adding in an exercise program and other healthy lifestyle factors (think: not smoking or decreasing daily stress). Continue reading >>

7-day Dash Diet Menu

7-day Dash Diet Menu

By:Victoria Seaver, M.S., R.D., C.D., Digital Meal Plan Editor Follow this 1,200-calorie DASH diet meal plan to help lower your blood pressure, lose weight and prevent diabetes. With 7 full days of healthy breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner recipes, this plan makes it easy to eat healthy. Follow this 1,200-calorie DASH diet meal plan to help lower your blood pressure, lose weight and prevent diabetes. With 7 full days of healthy breakfast, lunch, snack and dinner recipes, this plan makes it easy to eat healthy. We're guessing you don't hear about the DASH Diet as often as Whole30 or Paleo plans, which is why you may be surprised to learn that it has been voted "Best Diet Overall" for the past seven years in a row by U.S. News & World Report. The original intention of the DASH Diet (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) was to help lower high blood pressure (or hypertension), which research shows it does well. But even if you don't have high blood pressure, you might benefit from trying the DASH Diet, as research also shows it promotes weight loss and combats diabetes, all while being easy to follow and nutritious. The focus of the DASH Diet is more about what you can eat, rather than cutting foods out (like many trendy diets do these days). The basic idea is to load up on fruits and veggies, choose whole grains over refined, include calcium-rich low-fat dairy items, and eat modest amounts of lean meat and fish. Pretty straightforward, right? With this week's meal plan, we make it even easier to follow the DASH Diet with 7 days of healthy and delicious dinners. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure: What Can You Eat?

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure: What Can You Eat?

Many people suffer from these two diseases and might think it’s too hard to follow a diet that excludes salt and sugar. It is possible to carry out a healthy diet that meets the needs of both conditions, however. In today’s article we want to share with you what you can eat if you suffer from diabetes and high blood pressure. Tips for diabetics and people with high blood pressure It’s very important that you respect the recommendations of your doctor concerning what you can and cannot eat, or what foods are better reduced and avoided. Aside from what you eat, there are certain habits that can make the difference between leading a healthy life or one where your diabetes and high blood pressure symptoms don’t allow you to perform your daily activities. Here are some recommendations you should remember: Avoid bad lifestyle habits, like being sedentary and smoking. Don’t drink alcohol because of its high sugar content. Don’t consume processed foods, those soaked in brine, or smoked meats. Reduce the amount of salt in your meals and avoid putting salt on the table. Instead use herbs like oregano and rosemary to season your dishes. Drink 10 glasses of water during a day (have the first five in the morning). Develop a meal plan with a specialist. Slowly chew each bite of food and give yourself 30 minutes to finish eating. Consume three meals a day, one every six hours, with small snacks between meals. Measure the proportions and amounts that you eat on a daily basis. Be disciplined in your routine and lifestyle. Take a notebook to log your meals and any moods or symptoms. Measure your glucose and blood pressure at the same time every day (for example, after breakfast, before lunch, or after a nap). What should the diabetes and high blood pressure diet contain? Beca Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And Diabetes Diet: 3 Foods You Should Eat To Reduce Disease Risk

High Blood Pressure And Diabetes Diet: 3 Foods You Should Eat To Reduce Disease Risk

High Blood Pressure And Diabetes Diet: 3 Foods You Should Eat To Reduce Disease Risk This question originally appeared on Quora . Answer by MJ Thomas , Health and Nutrition Expert. Chronic inflammation is an increasingly common health condition that contributes to heart disease,diabetes, obesity arthritis and metabolic syndrome. Caused by a number of environmental factors including eating processed foods, saturated fats, sugar, and chemicals, inflammation is a dangerous condition that mimics many other serious health issues. Fortunately, there are a number ofnatural foods that reduce inflammation levels in the body - these include fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, whole grains, and certain spices. Increasing the amount of omega-3 fatty acids in the diet is perhaps the most important step in preventing inflammation in the body. With over 500 natural compounds, ginger has a number of health benefits - including calming an upset stomach, preventing motion sickness, and reducing inflammation. While science has yet discovered exactly how fresh ginger reduces inflammation in the body, it has been shown to reduce inflammation that contributes to arthritis and various cancers. Found in grapefruit, oranges, lemons and many vegetables, vitamin C is most commonly known for its cold fighting abilities. However, vitamin c is also a powerful antioxidant that reduces the harmful effects of stress and teams with vitamin E to serve as a very effective anti inflammatory food. Being water-soluble, vitamin C is not stored in the body; meaning it needs to be consumed throughout the day to maintain appropriate levels. Since the typical American diet is low in vitamin C, 1,000 to 4,000 mg (milligrams) a day through fresh fruit, vegetables, or supplement is recommended. Omega-3 and essential Continue reading >>

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Best Foods for Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, and Weight All these conditions involve a genetic sensitivity to refined carbohydrates. In many people, refined carbohydrates leads to abnormally high and low blood sugar levels, a condition called dysglycemia. This information sheet helps you reduce this abnormal response. Did you know that what you eat is a critical determinant of how much you eat? Whether you want to lose weight, or want to maintain your present healthy weight, choosing the right kinds of foods will help you achieve your goals. Let's leave calorie counting to the mathematicians. If you are overweight, you know what happens when you ask your doctor for help. The usual response is "follow this diet and get more exercise.†That doesn't work all by itself, does it? That is because it is based on a partial truth - that the reason people gain weight is that they eat too much and exercise too little. Let's look at the facts. The fact my overweight patients have been telling me for years is "Doc, it's my metabolism." Let’s see how and why your food choices influence that metabolism, so that you can know what to eat, and what not to eat, to improve your health and lose weight. First, I suggest you watch our videotape on weight gain. You can borrow it from our receptionist. Here is part of the script for that videotape… �������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ “To help you understand what to do about this kind of metabolism, Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

Anytime you incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet, you will be helping to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Check out this recipe for a good example of what you could put in your Blast: Incorporating fruits and veggies will also help with your kidney function, it may not increase the function but it will help support an overall healthier body. The best thing to do at this time is to start with a one Blast per day. Fill your tall cup with half vegetables, 1/4 low glycemic index fruits like peaches, pears, apples, cherries, apricots, figs, grapefruits and berries. Use unsweetened almond milk, coconut water or regular water as your liquid base and add some superfood boosts like chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seeds, ginger, turmeric, spirulina. Play around with that outline and find what works for you. You may want to decrease the amount of protein your are eating, for now aim to eat no meat 2-3 times per week. That will help to take some of the work load off your kidneys. Monitor your phosphorus levels with your doctor, if those start to rise we will modify your Blast plan. Ensure you are staying hydrated throughout the day and decrease processed foods from your diet, they are high in sodium and too much sodium can put additional stress on your kidneys. Don't be afraid to eat real food, just make sure each meal is balance and eat clean. Continue reading >>

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Take control of your health! Try these recipes from the eating plans mentioned in Heal Yourself With Food, and get on the road to a healthy recovery. Pritikin Diet to fight diabetes When combined with exercise, the Pritikin Diet can improve heart-disease risk factors; prevent and control Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several cancers; promote weight loss. It's low in fat and sodium and rich in natural unrefined carbs, vitamins, minerals, beneficial phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber with adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Pritikin Diet Recipes: Also try Prevention's New 30-Day Diabetes Diet to help manage your condition. Portfolio Diet to lower high cholesterol Relying on four categories of foods known to help prevent heart disease--soy, nuts, plant sterols, and foods high in sticky fiber--and restricting meat, fish, and dairy (high cholesterol foods) the Portfolio Diet produces fast results and works about as well as statins in people with moderately high cholesterol. Portfolio Diet Recipes: DASH Diet to lower high blood pressure The DASH eating plan, which can prevent and control high blood pressure when used along with lifestyle changes such as exercise, calls for a certain number of daily servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, fat-free dairy, lean meats, and nuts. DASH Diet Recipes: [pagebreak] Recipes for diabetes from the Pritikin Eating Plan Ingredients: 2 ½ lb. portabello mushrooms, stems removed & washed 1 cup red peppers, de-seeded and diced ½ c yellow pepper, de-seeded and diced 3 tablespoons basil leaves, chiffonaide 3 tablespoons fresh thyme, picked & chopped 1 teaspoon oregano, dry ½ cup garlic, chopped ½ cup red onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ground 1 cup eggplant, peeled and diced ½ Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes , youve probably already startedcounting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension , the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are sixsuggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, heres a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. RELATED: 3 Natural Ways to Control Your High Blood Pressure If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. I Continue reading >>

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Top 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure

Many people think that diabetics have to avoid many foods, including different fruits. However, there are super healthy fruits for diabetics because they provide important minerals, vitamins, phytochemicals and fiber. Some low-carb fruits are also good for diabetics. People who have this disease should care about the ratings of the glycemic index to measure the carbohydrates which are converted to the blood Gl. Scientifically, the suitable glycemic index for diabetics is below 50. The following are the top 19 good fruits for diabetics and high blood pressure. Let’s check out these fruits to control your blood sugar and cure diabetes naturally. 19 Good Fruits For Diabetics And High Blood Pressure Revealed! 1. Apples (Gl: 38, Gl/a fresh apple: 150g:7) Apples are very high in vitamin C, antioxidants and fiber. Apple pulp and peel contain pectin which helps to detoxify your body and remove harmful waste from the body. Pectin also is high in galacturonic acid that can help diabetics lower their insulin requirements up to 30%. You can eat a fresh apple or toss some slices of apples into a cup of tea and enjoy your breakfast. A medium apple contains about 12 g of carbohydrates and 54 calories. You can eat fresh apples without peeling them because apple peel includes a good source of anti-oxidants that good for digestion. Furthermore, apples are available throughout any seasons of the year. For containing a large amount of the soluble fiber, apples are fruit good for diabetics. Apples help diabetes patients reduce cholesterol, normalize their blood sugar level and improve their bowel function. Apple is also good at eliminating inflammation in the body and help diabetics beat infections effectively. Besides, apple is rich in anti-oxidants that help boost immunity. Apple also h Continue reading >>

Foods To Eat With High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

Foods To Eat With High Blood Pressure & Diabetes

High blood pressure increases your risk for heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular disease. Blood pressure management is critical if you have diabetes since it also increases your risk for diabetes complications. In addition to maintaining a healthy weight and limiting alcohol intake, a healthy diet can improve your blood pressure levels and your overall health, according to the American Heart Association. For best results, seek specified guidance from a qualified health care professional. Video of the Day Fruits and vegetables provide rich amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber. Fruits and vegetables also have a mellowing effect on blood sugar levels and can help lower blood pressure, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Consume a variety of fresh, colorful fruits and vegetable regularly for broadest dietary benefits. Since fruit and starchy vegetables contain carbohydrates, consume appropriate portion sizes and daily amounts, as recommended by your doctor or diabetes specialist. Examples of nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables include citrus fruits, berries, apples, pears, plums, kiwi, cantaloupe, tomatoes, avocado, spinach, kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, red and green bell peppers, carrots and peas. Nutritious starchy vegetables include squash, sweet potatoes, baked potatoes and pumpkin. Whole grains also provide rich amounts of nutrients and fiber. As low-glycemic carbohydrate sources, whole grains can support healthy blood sugar levels and keep you fuller longer between meals. Consume a variety of whole grain foods as part of a balanced, healthy diet for best results. Foods rich in whole grain nutrition include whole grain breads, tortillas, pasta and cereals, brown rice, quinoa, wild rice, air-popped popcorn and Continue reading >>

7-day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure (dietitian-made)

7-day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure (dietitian-made)

Looking for a sample meal plan to follow… one that you can follow right now? The 7-Day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure is a Dietitian-made plan to help make life easier (and more delicious) when learning what you should and should not eat with hypertension. It’s designed to be: Simple to follow for busy people with many mouths to feed, as long as you prepare in advance Realistic, with recipes that are not too complex Low in salt (no bread, minimal use of sauces and condiments). Salt restrictions seem unnecessary for healthy individuals, but is hugely beneficial for those with existing high blood pressure (1). Rich in nutrients that may influence blood pressure, including potassium and magnesium. Budget-friendly (except for one salmon dish, and two with quinoa). Favourable for those who love peanut butter and sweet potatoes. I have a huge bias towards those foods because they are delightful (not together though!). You can follow the entire plan, but perhaps it’s better to choose your favourite recipes and include them one at a time. Almost all recipes are from qualified Dietitians that I encourage you to follow. The 7-Day Diet Plan For High Blood Pressure Must-Read Starting Notes: Consult with your personal doctor or Dietitian first: While I am a qualified Dietitian, I’m not familiar with your personal medical history, your current medications or additional factors that need to be considered when altering your diet. Choose water as your drink: The meal plan does not include drinks, but keep a bottle of water with you at all times and drink up. Herbal tea (especially Hibiscus), regular tea and coffee should be fine, except for those who are sensitive to caffeine. Flexibility is key: Of course this plan cannot meet all your individual needs, so if there is an ing Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes