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High Blood Pressure Cholesterol And Diabetes

Aan Publications

Aan Publications

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4 PM ET, April 13, 2011 Treating High Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Diabetes May Lower Risk of Alzheimers Disease ST. PAUL, Minn. Treating high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes and other vascular risk factors may help lower the risk of Alzheimers disease in people who already show signs of declining thinking skills or memory problems. The research is published in the April 13, 2011, online issue of Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology . Researchers followed 837 people with mild cognitive impairment, the stage of memory loss that often leads to Alzheimers disease. Of the group, 414 had at least one vascular risk factor. Participants were given blood tests and a medical history questionnaire and also underwent other tests that measured blood pressure, body mass, memory and thinking skills. Participants who had vascular risk factors were placed into three groups: those with no risk factors treated, those with some risk factors treated and those with all risk factors treated. Treatment of risk factors included using high blood pressure medicines, insulin, cholesterol-lowering drugs and diet control. Smoking and drinking were considered treated if the person stopped smoking or drinking at the start of the study.After five years, 298 people developed Alzheimers disease. The others still had mild cognitive impairment. People with risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, cerebrovascular disease and high cholesterol were two times more likely to develop Alzheimers disease than those without vascular risk factors. A total of 52 percent of those with risk factors developed Alzheimers disease, compared to 36 percent of those with no risk factors. Of those with vascular risk factors, people who were rec Continue reading >>

Natural Ways To Combat High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure

Natural Ways To Combat High Cholesterol And High Blood Pressure

This week in diabetes management sessions, I counseled a 63-year old patient who has had type 2 diabetes for 5 years and was being treated with Metformin, 1000mg, twice a day. He never attended diabetes or nutritional education and had very little understanding of proper self-care except for taking his “two diabetes pills”. He did all the food shopping and preparation since his original diagnosis. His present blood sugars, cholesterol, and blood pressure had gone way out of control along with a recent unexplained 51-pound weight loss from a normal weight of 172 to 121. His answer to the weight loss was to eat anything he could find that seemed high calorie without making wise choices due to his lack of knowledge. He added foods high in sugar, fat and salt for weight gain. He refused to do any exercise including walking for fear of losing more weight. While this patient is being medically evaluated for his unexpected weight loss, hypertension and high blood cholesterol numbers, we needed to get him get back on track with positive lifestyle changes and reduce his fear. He understands that he may need additional medications but is willing to learn better health habits as well. He was unaware that “hypertension” meant the same thing as high blood pressure and thought he was just “too tense”. He was anxious and upset about his unexplained weight loss which did not help his blood pressure or cholesterol levels. In the meantime, we reviewed healthy tips to lower his numbers. Let’s examine some of the information that was offered to him. What is Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)? Hypertension or high blood pressure makes your heart work harder and may eventually lead to atherosclerosis, heart arrhythmias (such as atrial fibrillation), myocardial infarction, heart Continue reading >>

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Heal Yourself With Food: Recipes

Take control of your health! Try these recipes from the eating plans mentioned in Heal Yourself With Food, and get on the road to a healthy recovery. Pritikin Diet to fight diabetes When combined with exercise, the Pritikin Diet can improve heart-disease risk factors; prevent and control Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and several cancers; promote weight loss. It's low in fat and sodium and rich in natural unrefined carbs, vitamins, minerals, beneficial phytochemicals, antioxidants and dietary fiber with adequate amounts of protein and essential fatty acids. Pritikin Diet Recipes: Also try Prevention's New 30-Day Diabetes Diet to help manage your condition. Portfolio Diet to lower high cholesterol Relying on four categories of foods known to help prevent heart disease--soy, nuts, plant sterols, and foods high in sticky fiber--and restricting meat, fish, and dairy (high cholesterol foods) the Portfolio Diet produces fast results and works about as well as statins in people with moderately high cholesterol. Portfolio Diet Recipes: DASH Diet to lower high blood pressure The DASH eating plan, which can prevent and control high blood pressure when used along with lifestyle changes such as exercise, calls for a certain number of daily servings of grains, vegetables, fruits, fat-free dairy, lean meats, and nuts. DASH Diet Recipes: [pagebreak] Recipes for diabetes from the Pritikin Eating Plan Ingredients: 2 ½ lb. portabello mushrooms, stems removed & washed 1 cup red peppers, de-seeded and diced ½ c yellow pepper, de-seeded and diced 3 tablespoons basil leaves, chiffonaide 3 tablespoons fresh thyme, picked & chopped 1 teaspoon oregano, dry ½ cup garlic, chopped ½ cup red onion, peeled and diced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, ground 1 cup eggplant, peeled and diced ½ Continue reading >>

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Microsoft Word - Dysglycemic Diet.doc

Best Foods for Diabetes, High Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, and Weight All these conditions involve a genetic sensitivity to refined carbohydrates. In many people, refined carbohydrates leads to abnormally high and low blood sugar levels, a condition called dysglycemia. This information sheet helps you reduce this abnormal response. Did you know that what you eat is a critical determinant of how much you eat? Whether you want to lose weight, or want to maintain your present healthy weight, choosing the right kinds of foods will help you achieve your goals. Let's leave calorie counting to the mathematicians. If you are overweight, you know what happens when you ask your doctor for help. The usual response is "follow this diet and get more exercise.†That doesn't work all by itself, does it? That is because it is based on a partial truth - that the reason people gain weight is that they eat too much and exercise too little. Let's look at the facts. The fact my overweight patients have been telling me for years is "Doc, it's my metabolism." Let’s see how and why your food choices influence that metabolism, so that you can know what to eat, and what not to eat, to improve your health and lose weight. First, I suggest you watch our videotape on weight gain. You can borrow it from our receptionist. Here is part of the script for that videotape… �������� � ������ ������������������������������������������ “To help you understand what to do about this kind of metabolism, Continue reading >>

Know Your Health Numbers

Know Your Health Numbers

Individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are more likely to have high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, and, of course, high blood sugar. They are also likely to be overweight/obese. All of these factors increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other serious health complications. If you have prediabetes or diabetes, it is crucial to carefully monitor blood cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and weight as a first step in controlling the disease and improving the quality of your health. Maybe you are not experiencing any symptoms. Why is monitoring these numbers still important? Keep in mind that there are no symptoms for people with prediabetes, and diabetes may be severe before there are any warning signs. Likewise, people have no way of knowing they have high cholesterol or high blood pressure without being tested. "Next time you visit your health care provider, be sure to ask for your critical health numbers to be screened and develop a plan, which may include diet, exercise and medication, to manage them," said Daniel W. Jones, M.D. and past president of the American Heart Association. Find out what else Dr. Jones has to say about monitoring your health numbers by watching this video. How Critical Numbers are Monitored By drawing blood, your health care provider can conduct a blood lipid profile to check your blood cholesterol and glucose tests to check your blood sugar. Your blood pressure and weight are even easier to check with a blood pressure monitor and scales respectively. Between doctor visits, you can monitor and track your blood sugar, blood pressure, and body weight. Easy-to-use home glucose monitors, blood pressure monitors, and bathroom scales are readily available at retailers and pharmacies. By keeping track of yo Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made by the body and found in some animal-based foods. Blood cholesterol levels describe a group of fats also known as lipoproteins which includes HDL-C, or "good" cholesterol and LDL-C or "bad" cholesterol. Cholesterol is important to overall health, but when levels are too high, cholesterol can be harmful by contributing to narrowed or blocked arteries. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are more prone to having unhealthy high cholesterol levels, which contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD). By taking steps to manage cholesterol, individuals can reduce their chance of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Using a blood sample taken after a brief period of fasting by the patient, a lipoprotein profile reveals the following lipid measures: Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A high LDL-C level is associated with a higher risk for CVD. However, your LDL number should no longer be the main factor in guiding treatment to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the latest guidelines from the American Heart Association. For patients taking statins, it’s important to work with your doctor to manage your LDL appropriately. A diet high in saturated and trans fats can raise your LDL cholesterol. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL-C, higher levels are associated with a lower risk for CVD. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at higher risk for heart disease. People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, and certain drugs, such as beta-blockers and anabolic steroids, also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all contribute to lower HDL cholesterol. Triglycerid Continue reading >>

Tips For Eating With High Cholesterol And Diabetes

Tips For Eating With High Cholesterol And Diabetes

If you have been diagnosed with both high cholesterol and type 2 diabetes, you may be feeling overwhelmed at the prospect of changing your diet. You should know that there is considerable overlap for how to eat with the two conditions and that it is not as difficult as you may think. There are several things to keep in mind when it comes to your diet. Here are three first steps for managing high cholesterol and diabetes through your diet. 1. Increase Fiber First things first. Eat more vegetables. There's a reason the diabetic plate method recommends filling half of your plate with nonstarchy vegetables: they're loaded with fiber. They're also super high in good-for-you phytonutrients, but fiber is the big one for both cholesterol and diabetes. Fiber is the indigestible part of plants. Meaning, you eat it, it fills you up, but it doesn't add any calories. That's helpful for diabetes since many people with type 2 diabetes are also watching their weight. Soluble fiber (the kind found in beans, apples, oatmeal) aids in lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol and also helps to keep blood glucose levels steady. Fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are the best sources of fiber. Aim to increase the amount of fiber you eat every day gradually, to at least 25 grams per day if you're a woman; 38 grams per day if you're a man. 2. Choose Good Fats Over Bad Fats Another healthy change for both diabetes and high cholesterol is to swap the fats and oils you use. As a general rule, you want to eat more monounsaturated fats (found in foods such as walnuts, avocado, and olive oil) and decrease saturated fats (found in marbled meats and full-fat dairy products) and trans fats (found in fried foods and baked goods). 3. Lose Weight This one might be harder, but getting to a healthy weight can Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

If you have diabetes you should aim to keep your blood pressure well controlled. Having high blood pressure (hypertension) is one of several risk factors that can increase your chance of developing heart disease, a stroke and some other complications. Treatment includes a change in lifestyle risk factors where these can be improved. Many people with diabetes need to take medication to lower their blood pressure. How common is high blood pressure in people with diabetes? In the UK, about half of all people aged over 65, and about 1 in 4 of all middle-aged adults, have high blood pressure (hypertension). It is less common in younger adults. High blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes. Around 3 in 10 people with type 1 diabetes and around 8 in 10 people with type 2 diabetes develop high blood pressure at some stage. People with diabetes are more at risk of developing high blood pressure if they: Are of African-Caribbean origin. Are from the Indian sub-continent. Have a family history of high blood pressure. Have certain lifestyle factors - for example, those who: Are overweight. Eat a lot of salt. Do not eat much fruit and vegetables. Do not take much exercise. Drink a lot of alcohol. What is high blood pressure? This is not as simple to answer as it may seem. In general, the higher the blood pressure, the greater the risk to health. Depending on various factors, the level at which blood pressure is said to be high (hypertension) can vary from person to person. The cut-off point for blood pressure that is said to be high is 140/80 mm Hg or above for people with diabetes and 130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes and complications (for example, kidney disease). These are lower than the cut-off point for people who do not have diabetes. Note: high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypertension

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition that’s often present in people with type 2 diabetes. It’s unknown why there’s such a significant correlation between the two diseases. It’s believed that obesity, a diet high in fat and sodium, and inactivity contribute to both conditions. Hypertension is known as a “silent killer” because it has no obvious symptoms and many people are unaware that they have it. A 2013 survey by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) found that fewer than half of people at risk for heart disease or type 2 diabetes reported discussing biomarkers, including blood pressure, with their care providers. If you have hypertension, it means that your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Over time, consistently high blood pressure tires the heart muscle and can enlarge it. In 2008, 67 percent of adults aged 20 and over with self-reported diabetes had blood pressure rates of greater than 140/90. In the general population and in people with diabetes, a blood pressure reading of less than or equal to 140/90 is considered normal. What does this mean? The first number (140) is called the systolic pressure. It indicates the highest pressure exerted as blood pushes through your heart. The second number (90) is called the diastolic pressure. This is the pressure maintained by the arteries when the vessels are relaxed between heartbeats. Healthy people should get their blood pressure checked several times a year. People with diabetes need to be even more vigilant. If you have diabetes, you should have your pressure checked at least four times each year. If you have diabetes and high blood pressure, the ADA recommends that you self-monitor at home, record the readings, and share them with your doctor. Ac Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure: Does It Lead To Diabetes?

High Blood Pressure: Does It Lead To Diabetes?

"Study gives strongest link yet between blood pressure and diabetes," says The Guardian. At first glance these might be considered two unconnected conditions, but research over the years has led to diabetes being classified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Researchers looked at data on more than 4 million people in the UK who were free of any vascular disease or diabetes. They then analysed these people's medical records for around seven years and recorded new cases of diabetes and changes in blood pressure. People with high blood pressure were found to have around a 50% increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The researchers then backed up their findings by looking at previous research and found a risk of more than 70%. While these types of studies can't prove increased blood pressure causes diabetes, they lend weight to the advice to take steps to lower your blood pressure if it's high to reduce your risk of diabetes. Read our advice on how to look after your heart and circulation. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Oxford and was funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research. It was published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This story has been reported widely in the media. Both The Guardian and The Independent have responsibly provided quotes from one of the researchers, who explained the findings tell us a link exists, but we don't know whether high blood pressure is a cause of diabetes or whether it's a risk factor. What kind of research was this? This was a large cohort study and systematic review with meta-analysis to determine whether there is an association between blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. While the cohort study cannot prove cau Continue reading >>

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Got Diabetes And High Blood Pressure? 9 Diet Tips

Two out of three people with diabetes also have high blood pressure. Keeping your diet in check -- counting carbs, limiting sugar, eating less salt -- is key. You can still eat well and manage your conditions with these easy tips. Since you have high blood pressure, you should get no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That's less than a teaspoon. So retrain taste buds. Instead of reaching for the saltshaker, flavor food with citrus zest, garlic, rosemary, ginger, jalapeno peppers, oregano, or cumin. Cooking at home also helps. “If you’re eating something from a bag or box or off a restaurant menu, chances are you’re getting too much sodium,” says Janet Bond Brill, PhD, RD, author of Blood Pressure Down. To get in the habit of having a balanced diet, “visualize your plate as a clock,” says Amber L. Taylor, MD, who directs The Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Fill half your plate with fruits and vegetables. A quarter gets lean protein like baked fish, beans, or chicken. The last quarter holds grains, preferably whole, like brown rice. You’ll still need to count carbohydrates and make sure you're not getting too much sodium. Caffeine can raise your blood sugar and blood pressure. If you have higher blood sugar or blood pressure after drinking coffee, “limit your caffeine intake to 200 milligrams -- about 2 cups of coffee -- a day,” says Torey Jones Armul, RD, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Skip the French press or espresso and choose coffee made with a paper filter. The paper soaks up an oily compound in coffee beans called cafestol, which can hike up cholesterol. You can also consider switching to decaf. “Some research suggests it can reduce blood sugar,” Armul says. Continue reading >>

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure And Cholesterol: How One Condition Impacts The Other

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure And Cholesterol: How One Condition Impacts The Other

I was diagnosed with Diabetes Type II in 1999. Prior to that date my blood pressure readings were averaging 147/91. In January of 2000 my doctor put me on Lipitor. Could my HBP be considered a secondary condition that is likely to be caused in part and/or aggravated by the diabetes mellitus? Multiple readers have noted that they have one combination or another of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia (elevated cholesterol, or triglycerides, or low HDL cholesterol) and asked which came first and whether one is secondary to the other. The relationship is often complex as each can not only worsen the other but also increases the effect upon the adverse problems that can lead to heart disease. In the question that I am answering, the blood pressures were already elevated and we would at least call them “pre hypertensive” before. The reason that we use the term “pre hypertensive” is that people who run high pressure early in life are more likely than others to run even higher pressures as they age. Indeed, the likelihood of having high blood pressure is quite low before age thirty but increases with each decade of life. One of the reasons that blood pressure increases as we get older is arteriosclerosis. Our arteries are quite compliant and expand with each push of blood pumping from the heart. The arteries become a bit stiffer as we age (come to think of it, so are our joints), and no longer cushion the shock of blood coursing through under pressure from the heart. This stiffness causes the pressure within the blood vessels to rise, and this is what we actually measure. As we age, in a “Western” society our unhealthy diets lead us to deposit fat molecules (mostly forms of cholesterol) into the walls of the blood vessels building up “plaque Continue reading >>

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

What Foods Are Best For High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Cholesterol And Kidney Function?

Anytime you incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your diet, you will be helping to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Check out this recipe for a good example of what you could put in your Blast: Incorporating fruits and veggies will also help with your kidney function, it may not increase the function but it will help support an overall healthier body. The best thing to do at this time is to start with a one Blast per day. Fill your tall cup with half vegetables, 1/4 low glycemic index fruits like peaches, pears, apples, cherries, apricots, figs, grapefruits and berries. Use unsweetened almond milk, coconut water or regular water as your liquid base and add some superfood boosts like chia seeds, hemp seeds, flax seeds, ginger, turmeric, spirulina. Play around with that outline and find what works for you. You may want to decrease the amount of protein your are eating, for now aim to eat no meat 2-3 times per week. That will help to take some of the work load off your kidneys. Monitor your phosphorus levels with your doctor, if those start to rise we will modify your Blast plan. Ensure you are staying hydrated throughout the day and decrease processed foods from your diet, they are high in sodium and too much sodium can put additional stress on your kidneys. Don't be afraid to eat real food, just make sure each meal is balance and eat clean. Continue reading >>

Heart Disease Risk In Diabetics - Blood Pressure, Cholesterol | Everyday Health

Heart Disease Risk In Diabetics - Blood Pressure, Cholesterol | Everyday Health

MONDAY, Jan. 28, 2013 For people with diabetes, tightly controlled blood sugar is not enough to prevent a heart attack or stroke, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. The study included more than 26,000 patients with diabetes. Those who met recommendedguidelines forcholesterollevels , blood pressure, and blood sugar were the least likely to be hospitalized for a heart attack or stroke. Patients who met no guidelines or only met the guidelines for blood sugar control were the most likely to be hospitalized for a heart attack or stroke. These findings emphasize the need to closely monitor key heart-health indicators. The American Diabetes Association recommends that patients with diabetes maintain a target blood pressure reading of less than 130/80 mm Hg, an LDL cholesterol level of less than 100 mg/dl, and an A1C blood glucose level of less than 7 percent. "People with diabetes are often focused on controlling their blood sugar, but our study found that controlling blood pressure and cholesterol is even more important in preventing heart disease," said lead author Greg Nichols, PhD, in a release. "This doesn't mean that people with diabetes should ignore their blood sugar levels. They should still get regular A1C tests to measure and control their blood glucose, but it's also important to pay attention to other factors that increase the risk for cardiovascular disease ." A person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without diabetes, according to the National Institutes of Health, and they're much more likely to develop heart disease earlier than someone without the disease. They're also more likely to have a second heart and die from a heart attack than the general populat Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Diabetes: A1c, Blood Pressure, And Cholesterol

The Abcs Of Diabetes: A1c, Blood Pressure, And Cholesterol

Three important diabetes measures There is so much to think about when you have diabetes, but this easy-to-remember acronym will help you focus on what’s important and take control of your health. Read our breakdown and talk to your doctor about what’s right for you. A = AIC What is it? An A1C blood test measures the percentage of hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in your red blood cells) coated with sugar. It measures your average blood glucose (sugar) level over the past two to three months. The A1C test gives you and your health care provider a measure of your progress. Most people with diabetes should have an A1C test every three to six months; people who are meeting their treatment goals may need the test only twice a year. Why is it important? The A1C test is a good measure of how well your glucose is under control. It can also be a good tool for determining if someone with prediabetes is progressing toward or has developed type 2 diabetes. Adults over age 45 with hypertension, obesity, or a family history of diabetes also are advised to get an A1C test because they have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Finding out you have an elevated A1C is a cue to make positive changes to your lifestyle. What do the numbers mean? 5.7% or lower = normal blood glucose levels 5.8–6.4% = elevated blood glucose levels (prediabetes) 6.5% or higher = diabetes What should my numbers be? For years, people with type 2 were told to strive for an A1C of 7 percent or less, but new research indicates that one level doesn’t fit all. Based on your health status, age, and risk factors, you and your health care provider should determine an A1C goal for you. Here are the American Diabetes Association’s new general guidelines: Person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

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