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High Altitude Affecting Blood Sugar

Effect Of High Altitude On Blood Glucose Meter Performance.

Effect Of High Altitude On Blood Glucose Meter Performance.

Abstract Participation in high-altitude wilderness activities may expose persons to extreme environmental conditions, and for those with diabetes mellitus, euglycemia is important to ensure safe travel. We conducted a field assessment of the precision and accuracy of seven commonly used blood glucose meters while mountaineering on Mount Rainier, located in Washington State (elevation 14,410 ft). At various elevations each climber-subject used the randomly assigned device to measure the glucose level of capillary blood and three different concentrations of standardized control solutions, and a venous sample was also collected for later glucose analysis. Ordinary least squares regression was used to assess the effect of elevation and of other environmental potential covariates on the precision and accuracy of blood glucose meters. Elevation affects glucometer precision (p = 0.08), but becomes less significant (p = 0.21) when adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. The overall effect of elevation was to underestimate glucose levels by approximately 1-2% (unadjusted) for each 1,000 ft gain in elevation. Blood glucose meter accuracy was affected by elevation (p = 0.03), temperature (p < 0.01), and relative humidity (p = 0.04) after adjustment for the other variables. The interaction between elevation and relative humidity had a meaningful but not statistically significant effect on accuracy (p = 0.07). Thus, elevation, temperature, and relative humidity affect blood glucose meter performance, and elevated glucose levels are more greatly underestimated at higher elevations. Further research will help to identify which blood glucose meters are best suited for specific environments. Continue reading >>

Does Altitude Affect Blood Sugar Readings?

Does Altitude Affect Blood Sugar Readings?

Does altitude affect blood sugar readings? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does altitude affect blood sugar readings? A friend called me today to see if I might help find an answer for him. He is 70, diagnosed type II 2 years, fairly well controlled by diet and exercise alone. Normal bgs. fasting 110-125, dropping to 100 before lunch. 2 hr PP normally in the 130's. He watches his carbs carefully. Around 15-25 grams carb at lunch and 10-15 at other meals -- less than 75 day. Problem is he is vacationing in New Mexico at 8700' above sea level -- he lives at 700' in Texas. His blood sugar has gone up very high with little or no change in his diet. Fasting is now 170's and doesn't drop as it usually does. PP after lunch (his largest meal) is also 170's. Lowest he's been since being in NM is 145+/-. His question is does altitude affect bgs, and if so, what can he do to help bring numbers down without meds? (He's not close to medical help where he's vacationing.) I've searched this forum and found nothing. Did find a a 2 year old thread on another forum that indicated bgs in Type 1s can be affected either way by altitudes above 6500', and meters tend to lose accuracy above that elevation also. Does anyone have any other information or personal experience that I can pass along to him as how he can bring his bgs down? I've been vacationing in Utah for the past week, at 9200 feet, and I find that my BGs are running higher than usual, but not hugely. Average for the last 7 days is running 94; 5% higher than the week before. Fastings all in the 90s (and one 101), after a week in the high 80s. My highs are not necessarily higher (only Continue reading >>

Altitude |

Altitude |

Aside from the in-flight experience, you may need to deal with the effects of high altitude if you are traveling to one of various popular destination spots renowned for their high altitude sports such as cross country skiing, snowboarding, or mountain climbing. Having an awareness of how altitude may affect your blood glucose readings in these situations is a must for anyone with diabetes. Most blood glucose meters are dependent on oxygen to work properly. At altitude, the amount of oxygen in the air decreases and can negatively affect the performance of a meter, leading to errors in working out dosages. Most people only pause to wonder about altitude once they are boarding a plane for a long-haul flight, but what about people who live at altitude? There are numerous cities across the globe that are situated in high altitude settings. Individuals with diabetes who live in these cities may regularly administer erroneous insulin dosages. Cities such as these include Colorado Springs, USA (1840 meters, 6040 feet), Mexico City, Mexico (2200 meters, 7220 feet), and La Paz, Bolivia (3640 meters, 11940 feet). For many blood glucose meters, there is about a 1-2% underestimation of blood glucose levels for every 300 meters (1,000 feet) of elevation. This could mean nearly 25% error in the daily meter readings if you live in La Paz! No wonder many individuals have a hard time establishing strong control of their levels while traveling. Even if they are able to hit their target numbers, their meters may not be reading accurately. How frustrating! Further research needs to be conducted to check the performance of glucometers as various altitudes in order to better understand the relationship between altitude and glucometer performance. Until then, speak with your team of medical Continue reading >>

High Altitude's Never-ending Love For Hypoglycemia - Diabetes Daily Grind | Real Life Diabetes Podcastdiabetes Daily Grind | Real Life Diabetes Podcast

High Altitude's Never-ending Love For Hypoglycemia - Diabetes Daily Grind | Real Life Diabetes Podcastdiabetes Daily Grind | Real Life Diabetes Podcast

High Altitudes Never-Ending Love For Hypoglycemia On trail to Mt. St. Vrain in the Rocky Mountain National Park 2 days. 8 low blood sugars. The numbers tellthestory:the higher you climb, the lower you fall.We all enjoy good paradox, right? Am I a mountain man? No, partlybecause it takes me 3 weeks to grow a 5 oclock shadow, and I spend the majority of my life at sea level. Oxygen likes to have a good time at sea level. It glides into my lungs with relative ease, slips into my blood, and enjoys homeostasis. At high elevations, especially those approaching 10,000 feet, oxygen gets depressed. It hides out with its cats and starts crocheting. In response to this hermitism, the heart works double time. Being that the heart is a relatively selfish organ in its oxygen (and subsequently glucose) use, it singlehandedly elevates our metabolism, by 10-20% at my best guess. So whats the end result for the insulin-deficient? Low blood sugars. When you toss in a bit of strenuoushiking on a non-acclimated body, youve got yourself the perfect recipe for consistent hypos. Its now day 3. Im about to set out on a hike. Just scarfed down a healthy sized breakfast and Im defying all logic with a no bolus policy. Why? Well, because its hard to bounce back from a low just 30 minutes into a hike. Ill check every 30 minutes, avoid complete diabetes management ignorance, and bask in some mountain air. If youve traversed the high altitude diabetes management journey, drop us a few tips below! Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Altitude

Diabetes In The Altitude

I spent the last week in Crested Butte, Colorado, for what has now become an annual family ski trip. The place we were staying was at an elevation of 7,000-something feet. Of course, my mom told us to drink plenty of water and take saltwater nose drops to flush the system out. All of this is fine and dandy, but I wondered what, if any, effect does altitude have on diabetes ? I know that my lungs were working a bit harder to adapt to the drier air. I was out of breath after climbing two sets of stairs. I also found that I needed a snack every couple of hours on the slopes, but this makes sense, as snow skiing is a workout. I would leave the condo every morning with my glucometer, NovoLog FlexPen, needles, and about four granola bars to eat on the lifts in between runs in case I felt a little low. The tricky part here was that it was more of a guessing game, because my glucometer could easily get too cold at the top of the mountain to check my blood glucose. Anyone have any tips on checking your blood glucose outside in really cold weather? This year had exceptionally good weather for spring skiing and we celebrated my niece Sara Reevess fifth birthday. I really enjoy spending time with her and watching her grow up. We skied together and she followed right in my tracks. There is nothing cuter than a five-year-old with pigtails on skis. After a long day on the slopes, we got in the hot tub with everyone for a few minutes and she felt like a big girl. One morning, before breakfast, I was in the kitchen drawing up my insulin , and she was at the bar having cereal. I asked her if she wanted to give me a shot, and she said no. Then she said something that surprised me. She said one of her best friends, Molly, has diabetes. Maybe its just that it was coming from an adorable fi Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring At High Altitudes

Blood Glucose Monitoring At High Altitudes

Blood Glucose Monitoring at High Altitudes I would like to comment on Dr. Christian D. Herter's article in the "Clinical Decision Making" section of Diabetes Spectrum ("DKA on Mt. Rainier: A Case Report," Vol. 12, No. 4, p. 198-200, 1999). Although many people may never attempt the extremes of temperature, altitude, and physical exertion reported by Dr. Herter, the article brought to light some important and often overlooked management issues that can also be experienced in less extreme conditions. Dr. Herter's "five extra essentials" (extra insulin, extra supplies, back-up monitoring supplies, injectable glucagon, and willingness to communicate) should be taken on all trips, not just outdoor adventures. Having dealt extensively with blood glucose monitoring at various altitudes, I would like to further comment on the effects of altitude. As altitude increases over 6,000 feet, all meters and strips can be affected by the decreased oxygen needed for the enzymatic reaction to occur. Cold temperatures further compromise this reaction. I suggest that those traveling to higher altitudes carry control solution and compare the results at high altitude to those obtained at their home altitude. High altitudes affect even visual blood glucose test strips. Individuals with type 1 diabetes who travel need to be aware of these deviance's and to adjust their therapy appropriately to avoid medical emergencies. Continue reading >>

High Altitude And Diabetes

High Altitude And Diabetes

I often feel like living with diabetes is an extreme sport. It may not involve much physical exertion, but the mental effort required counting carbs, measuring exercise against insulin, worrying about lows while you sleep is just as tiring, if not more so, than preparing for a test of athletic endurance. I mean, hell a race eventually ends. Diabetes aint over till youre dead. Partially for this reason, I am not really into things labeled extreme (or, god help us, x-treme). Not extreme skiing, not extreme surfing, and certainly not Extreme Pizza, a chain near my old house in California. No, I prefer safety to adrenaline and while Im always up for adventure, I like there to be a safety harness attached. Unfortunately, Im about to wade into the waters of what Ive decided can be classified as extreme diabetes spending time at high altitude. My husband and I are currently traveling for several months before settling back down on the east coast, and our next adventure is traveling overland to Tibet. (Tomorrow, we take the train from Xining to Lhasa, on the worlds highest railway.) Im forgetting the precise numbers right now, but Lhasa is pretty damn high. And its not the highest place well be at the end of our overland journey, just before the Nepal border, well be at over 4,900 meters above sea level. Thats right: meters. Thats more than 16,000 feet. Its up there. So what does this have to do with diabetes? Several things. First, the symptoms of Acute Mountain Sickness which include dizziness and confusion are close to those of hypoglycemia. (If only our bodies had evolved more precise warning systems. There could be little codes an itchy left ear means altitude sickness. Tingling in your right buttock means low blood sugar. Wouldnt that be easier?) Second, if youre dehydra Continue reading >>

Effect Of High Altitude On Blood Glucose Meter Performance

Effect Of High Altitude On Blood Glucose Meter Performance

Participation in high-altitude wilderness activities may expose persons to extreme environ- mental conditions, and for those with diabetes mellitus, euglycemia is important to ensure safe travel. We conducted a field assessment of the precision and accuracy of seven commonly used blood glucose meters while mountaineering on Mount Rainier, located in Washington State (elevation 14,410 ft). At various elevations each climber-subject used the randomly as- signed device to measure the glucose level of capillary blood and three different concentra- tions of standardized control solutions, and a venous sample was also collected for later glu- cose analysis. Ordinary least squares regression was used to assess the effect of elevation and of other environmental potential covariates on the precision and accuracy of blood glucose meters. Elevation affects glucometer precision (p 0.08), but becomes less significant (p 0.21) when adjusted for temperature and relative humidity. The overall effect of elevation was to underestimate glucose levels by approximately 12% (unadjusted) for each 1,000 ft gain in elevation. Blood glucose meter accuracy was affected by elevation (p 0.03), temperature (p 0.01), and relative humidity (p 0.04) after adjustment for the other variables. The in- teraction between elevation and relative humidity had a meaningful but not statistically sig- nificant effect on accuracy (p 0.07). Thus, elevation, temperature, and relative humidity af- fect blood glucose meter performance, and elevated glucose levels are more greatly underestimated at higher elevations. Further research will help to identify which blood glu- cose meters are best suited for specific environments. blood glucose (SMBG) is an important part of the management of patients with diabetes mel- li Continue reading >>

High Altitude And Blood Sugars | Diabetic Connect

High Altitude And Blood Sugars | Diabetic Connect

By 1FLYCHIK Latest Reply2013-03-01 15:31:51 -0600 Hi Everyone. I wanted to see if anyone knows or has experienced this. I am traveling to Peru in 2 weeks to do some charity work and I am wondering if the high altitude there will affect my levels? If so, how did you manage them or what precautions did you take??? Everything else effects it, so why not high altitude?! Then the question becomes does low altitude send it the other way? I live and work at 1300-1400 feet, so where does high altitude start? May the Lord bless you and keep you and your team be safe from harm and disease. When I traveled to New Mexico a while back I found that my levels were elevated when we were camping. I was exercising more, eating better and less, but my levels still seemed to climb the mountains with me. Not really bad, but I would say I struggled with an additional 40 points of average. I go up to the Grand Canyon every year for a week for work, and the altitude there (8800 feet) doesn't mess with my levels at all! I do, however, get alititude sickness badly after my 2nd day up there, which is no fun at all, and makes it hard to work! Remember to drink lots and lots of water-it is supposed to help with that, and enjoy your time there. Sounds like you will be doing good things and enjoying your visit as well :) Continue reading >>

Living At High Altitude Could Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Living At High Altitude Could Reduce Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Living at high altitude could reduce type 2 diabetes risk Living at high altitude could reduce type 2 diabetes risk Sitting less and walking more could reduce fasting insulin levels by 11 per cent 27 January 2017 People living at higher altitudes have a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes , heart disease and stroke , according to Spanish researchers. Scientists at the University of Navarra suggest that the geographic area in which you live to contribute to the risk of metabolic syndrome. This is the medical term for the combination of high blood sugar , blood pressure and cholesterol , which contributes to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes , heart disease and stroke. "We found that those people living between 457 to 2,297 metres had a lower risk of developing metabolic syndrome than those living at sea level (zero to 121 metres)," said co-senior author and PhD candidate Amaya Lopez-Pascual. Obesity, smoking and sedentary behaviours are among the leading risk factors for metabolic syndrome, but not a lot is known about how our environment could affect this risk. The researchers analysed data from a Spanish project that asked participants to submit their health information twice-yearly since 1999. This data was then used to track the development of metabolic syndrome in relation to the altitude of where participants lived, of whom were initially health at the beginning of the study. It was shown that the higher the altitude where a person lived, the less likely they were to develop metabolic syndrome. This association existed even after analysis of family history. "Living or training at high altitudes or under a simulated hypoxic [oxygen deficient] environment seems to help with heart and lung function, losing weight , and improves insulin sensitivity ," said co-senior author Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Altitude: Your Complete Travel Guide

Diabetes And High Altitude: Your Complete Travel Guide

Does altitude affect your diabetes? Some people say yes, some say no. As with many aspects of diabetic care, it depends largely on the individual. What is altitude sickness? Altitude sickness...as defined by Google is... “Illness caused by ascent to high altitude, characterised by hyperventilation, nausea, and exhaustion resulting from shortage of oxygen.” So basically if you are going higher in the world than what you are used to...Then you are likely to experience altitude sickness. It affects everyone differently- I have had people tell me they couldn’t leave their hotel rooms, to people who managed it easily. Everyone is brilliantly unique! Diabetes and altitude sickness is then a whole other ball game. Blood glucose and altitude Does altitude affects blood sugars? Altitude can impact your blood sugars in a variety of ways... 1) Hypoglycemia and altitude The symptoms of altitude sickness are quite similar to those of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), such as, sickness, feeling light headed & dizzy, actual headaches & out of breath; so it can make it difficult to actually work out whether you are in a hypo or suffering from attitude sickness- this happened quite frequently with myself in Bolivia & Peru, and I would recommend testing your blood sugars even more frequently to make sure you know the difference. 2) Hyperglycemia and altitude Altitude can potentially cause your blood sugars to go high- now I have seen articles argue for and against this, but I will tell you that in my own experience, this is completely true. At high altitude my blood sugars took a turn for the worst and were a lot harder to control. I frequently had high blood sugars for no other logical reason- and when you have the continual symptoms of a high blood sugar, and the symptoms of altitu Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose And Altitude

Blood Glucose And Altitude

I am 72 years old and have had diabetes for 15 years. At sea level in Southern California, with a moderate activity level and normal eating habits, I need between 140 and 150 units of Humalog each day. When I exercise, my blood sugars rise, and I need insulin to come back down. I keep my blood glucose in check by measuring 4 to 6 times per day, and I use both a needle and a pump. I control to between 70 and 110 and have an A1C of 6.2.I currently live in Aspen/Snowmass, Colo., at an altitude of 8,200 feet. Although I do exercise more, my insulin requirement is between 40 and 50 units each day. In addition, when I exercise, my blood sugars drop, so I can only ski or bike starting at an elevated blood sugar level. Quite the opposite from sea level.The dawn phenomenon that I experience requires me to take an additional 15 units of insulin at sea level, but only an additional 6 units when I am at a higher altitude.I have not found an explanation yet for this phenomenon. William McArthur, Aspen/Snowmass, Colorado Continue reading >>

High Altitude And Diabetes

High Altitude And Diabetes

As I noted in my previous post, I recently took my diabetes with me on a trip to Tibet. (I offered to let it stay home, but it refused.) In addition to the whole altitude sickness/swollen-brain thing, which seemed likely to occur, given that we were going to be at altitudes up to 5100 meters above sea level, I was worried about how my diabetes equipment was going to function. What if my glucose meter stopped working? What if I was setting myself up for a week and a half of inaccurate readings and altitude-induced insulin resistance? Well, Im back at relatively normal heights now (1700 meters or so above sea level) and I have good and bad news. First, the good: my meter (an Abbott Freestyle and an Abbott Freestyle Navigator CGM) appeared to stand up admirably to my 16,000-foot ascent. I busted open my little bottle of control solution (am I the only diabetic out there who never usually uses the stuff?) and every time I checked, the result came back within the control solutions range. A big relief, even though the change in altitude made the bottle squirt red liquid all over my pants. Why the blood-colored control solution? Why? What the accuracy of my meter made clear, though, was that my second fear altitude-induced insulin resistance was indeed happening. Or, at least something was causing my blood sugar to refuse to budge after correction boluses. It could have been because I got food poisoning on our second day on the road, and spent several mornings vomiting on the toilet (Im all for multitasking, but thats taking it a step too far). But even once I felt better, my blood sugar remained so stubborn that I switched insertion sites to see if something had gone wrong. The tubing was fine; the insulin just wasnt working. I need to do more research on the causes behind a Continue reading >>

The Altitude Highs And Lows How High Altitude Affects Bloodglucose

The Altitude Highs And Lows How High Altitude Affects Bloodglucose

The Altitude Highs and Lows How high Altitude affects BloodGlucose Few things feel better than summiting an epic peak or racing down a mountain on skis, and few things feel worse than a bouncing blood sugar forming jagged peaks across your cgm monitor and ruining your epic day. Some of my favorite outdoor activities take place above sea level, but exercising at high altitude can be a glycemic nightmare for a type 1 diabetic. Curious as to why this is, I set about to understanding whats happening on the inside that could be impacting blood glucose at high altitude. The answers I found boil down to physiology and biochemistry, and Ill do my best to lay it out for you.Please see the end of the article for more research on these topics. Why do I tend to be hyperglycemic at high altitude? There is less oxygen and air pressure at higher altitudes. The earths gravity holds oxygen close to the surface, so that half of the oxygen in the atmosphere is found below 18,000 feet. This means that as you climb above sea level atmospheric pressure and oxygen pressure fall. Our bodies have multiple ways to adapt to existing at high altitude and having less oxygen,and there are short term adaptations as well as longer term adaptations. For the purpose of explaining altitudes effect on blood glucose, I will focus primarily on the shorter term responses. Why am I always winded when working out at high altitude? If youve ever hiked at higher altitudes, youll recognize the first one-hyperventilation. As you ascend you often find yourself breathing heavily, and you may feel easily winded. For most of us living close to sea level, this is normal. With less oxygen available, you begin to hyperventilate as a means of releasing excess CO2 (carbon dioxide), and increasing the rate of fresh air thr Continue reading >>

Altitude And Type 1 Diabetes

Altitude And Type 1 Diabetes

As you may already know, travel in general can have a big impact on Type 1 diabetes management. This is typically due to elements such as stress hormones, time change and other shifts in routine that can cause blood sugar levels to behave differently. However, there are other things to consider when taking trips or exploring the outdoors that might not occur to us right away – such as changes in altitude. The most important thing to remember when planning to journey some place at a higher altitude is that nobody is affected the same way, so it is best to be prepared for multiple outcomes. Altitude sickness By far the most common side effect of being at high altitudes is altitude sickness, which can then lead to (or simulate) other symptoms that can affect T1D management. Common symptoms of altitude sickness include: shortness of breath rapid heartbeat nausea exhaustion All of this is due to the decrease in oxygen, but these symptoms are also common when suffering from hypoglycemia (low blood sugar!). So it is important to test blood sugar levels often to distinguish between the two. Blood sugar levels Hypoglycemia – There is no direct evidence that altitude causes low blood sugar, but as previously mentioned, altitude symptoms can feel quite similar. Also, increased exercise (if hiking or walking a lot while in high altitudes), can definitely lead to lows. Hyperglycemia – Traveling, exercising and managing T1D when out in the elements can cause a good deal of stress. Stress hormones lead to high blood sugar. Insulin resistance There have been studies that suggest that higher altitudes can cause insulin resistance due to carbohydrates not being metabolized as effectively. This can be another cause of high blood sugar and it can also lead to ketones/ketoacidosis in Continue reading >>

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