diabetestalk.net

Heel Pain Diabetes Symptom

Heel Pain: Causes, Treatments, And Prevention

Heel Pain: Causes, Treatments, And Prevention

Your foot and ankle are made up of 26 bones, 33 joints, and more than 100 tendons. The heel is the largest bone in your foot. If you overuse or injure your heel, you may experience heel pain. This can range from mild to disabling. Its possible youll need to have a doctor or podiatrist diagnose the cause if simple home remedies dont ease the pain. There are several common causes of heel pain. Plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis occurs when too much pressure on your feet damages the plantar fascia ligament, causing pain and stiffness. Find out what causes this condition and possible treatment options. Sprains and strains. Sprains and strains are injuries to the body, often resulting from physical activity. These injuries are common and can range from minor to severe, depending on the incident. Learn more about sprains and strains. If you develop heel pain, you can try these methods at home to ease your discomfort: Apply ice to the heel for 10 to 15 minutes twice a day. Wear a night splint, a special device that stretches the foot while you sleep. Use heel lifts or shoe inserts to reduce pain. If these home care strategies dont ease your pain, you need to see your doctor. Theyll perform a physical exam and ask you about your symptoms and when they began. Your doctor may also take an X-ray to determine the cause of your heel pain. Once your doctor knows whats causing your pain, theyll be able to provide you with the appropriate treatment. In many cases, your doctor may prescribe physical therapy. This can help to strengthen the muscles and tendons in your foot, which helps to prevent further injury. If your pain is severe, your doctor may provide you with anti-inflammatory medications. These medications can be injected into the foot or taken by mouth. Your doctor may also Continue reading >>

Heel Pain: Causes, Prevention And Treatments

Heel Pain: Causes, Prevention And Treatments

Heel pain is a very common foot problem. The sufferer usually feels pain either under the heel (plantar fasciitis) or just behind it (Achilles tendinitis), where the Achilles tendon connects to the heel bone. Even though heel pain can be severe and sometimes disabling, it is rarely a health threat. Heel pain is typically mild and usually disappears on its own; however, in some cases the pain may persist and become chronic (long-term). There are 26 bones in the human foot, of which the heel (calcaneus) is the largest. The human heel is designed to provide a rigid support for the weight of the body. When we are walking or running it absorbs the impact of the foot when it hits the ground, and springs us forward into our next stride. Experts say that the stress placed on a foot when walking may be 1.25 times our body weight, and 2.75 times when running. Consequently, the heel is vulnerable to damage, and ultimately pain. In the majority of cases, heel pain has a mechanical cause. It may also be caused by arthritis, infection, an autoimmune problem trauma, a neurological problem, or some other systemic condition (condition that affects the whole body). Contents of this article: You will also see introductions at the end of some sections to any recent developments that have been covered by MNT's news stories. Also look out for links to information about related conditions. Here are some key points about heel pain. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Heel pain is usually felt either under the heel or just behind it. Heel pain has a prevalence of 3.6%. US studies estimate that 7% of older adults report tenderness under the heel. Plantar fasciitis is estimated to account for 8% of all running-related injuries. There are 26 bones in the human foot, of w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heel Pain – A Link To Plantar Fasciitis?

Diabetes And Heel Pain – A Link To Plantar Fasciitis?

It is well-established that diabetes can lead to problems with one’s feet. That being the case, can diabetes and heel pain induce plantar fasciitis? Is there a known link between plantar fasciitis and diabetic heel pain symptoms? The purpose of this article is to reveal current thinking about diabetes as a potential cause of plantar fasciitis and also to investigate reasons behind that thinking. Plantar Fasciitis and Diabetes In Diabetic Feet¹, Podantics Podiatry of Adelaide, Australia observed that approximately one out of every four individuals with diabetes will contract foot problems of some type. Similarly, an article entitled Diabetes and Heel Pain² noted that, of those diabetics who developed foot problems, the problems were “almost always associated with heel pain.” The article added that these problems are typically linked to circulation issues or neuropathy (nerve damage). Based on information from these two sites, let’s take a deeper look into these two types of symptoms. Diabetes Foot Pain Symptoms – Circulation Circulation issues are related to a reduced blood flow in parts of the body. With diabetes, this commonly occurs in veins and arteries providing blood to organs, legs, and arms below the stomach level. Such symptoms are labeled as peripheral vascular disease (PVD). Limited blood flow can lead to painful foot issues including swelling and dryness. This also hinders the body’s normal process of healing. Similar to what is discussed in a previous article entitled What is Plantar Fasciosis, reduced blood flow in the feet can also increase the risk of additional injury. Due to the lessened flow, important nutrients and critical oxygen do not get to the feet. This subjects the feet to further difficulties including, in particular, stabbing he Continue reading >>

Heel Pain - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Heel Pain - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I've had pain in my right heel for about couple of weeks and now its a bit bothering me. My doc said it could be due to inflamation of tissues in my heel. She suggested some exercise, pain killers and gel pad for my shoes. She also said, worst case, I will have to get a shot in my heel (steroid one??) to get rid of the pain. Have anyone of you have/had this and how are you dealing with this? I'm currently on diet and exercise only and I want to be able to continue with my exercise (treadmill 30 mins/day). not sure if i am aloud to say this in this forum but i came across a fantastic product the other day which says it helps with Supports Healthy Response to Inflammation* also below They?re Loaded With Antioxidants That Fight Free Radicals* Supports Healthy Response to Inflammation* I am also suffering from heel pain in my right foot, underneath the foot to be specific. Mine came from a little to heavy leg press exercise at the gym a feew weeks ago. I then took a brake from any exercise that directly affected my heel, i.e. no more leg press, running outside or on the treadmill. It then went away after a couple of weeks and I therefore returned to my 5 km run around my neighbourhood - this was a mistake as the pain is now back again. I already take Neurontin for nerve pain in my feets but this doesn't help on my heel problem so I have decided that it is not nerve related. I try to wear footwear that has a good cushion whenever possible as this means I can walk with no pain. I am going to see my endo doctor tomorrow in order to switch from oral medications to insulin and I will bring this heel p Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Heel Pain In Adults

Diagnosing Heel Pain In Adults

Heel pain is a common condition in adults that may cause significant discomfort and disability. A variety of soft tissue, osseous, and systemic disorders can cause heel pain. Narrowing the differential diagnosis begins with a history and physical examination of the lower extremity to pinpoint the anatomic origin of the heel pain. The most common cause of heel pain in adults is plantar fasciitis. Patients with plantar fasciitis report increased heel pain with their first steps in the morning or when they stand up after prolonged sitting. Tenderness at the calcaneal tuberosity usually is apparent on examination and is increased with passive dorsiflexion of the toes. Tendonitis also may cause heel pain. Achilles tendonitis is associated with posterior heel pain. Bursae adjacent to the Achilles tendon insertion may become inflamed and cause pain. Calcaneal stress fractures are more likely to occur in athletes who participate in sports that require running and jumping. Patients with plantar heel pain accompanied by tingling, burning, or numbness may have tarsal tunnel syndrome. Heel pad atrophy may present with diffuse plantar heel pain, especially in patients who are older and obese. Less common causes of heel pain, which should be considered when symptoms are prolonged or unexplained, include osteomyelitis, bony abnormalities (such as calcaneal stress fracture), or tumor. Heel pain rarely is a presenting symptom in patients with systemic illnesses, but the latter may be a factor in persons with bilateral heel pain, pain in other joints, or known inflammatory arthritis conditions. Key clinical recommendation Labels References Radionuclide bone scanning and magnetic resonance imaging are more sensitive and specific than plain-film radiographs in diagnosing osteomyelitis. B 2 Continue reading >>

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition characterized by sharp, stabbing heel pain. This pain often occurs when you get out of bed in the morning or stand up after sitting for a long period of time. "The majority of heel pain is caused by plantar fasciitis, or an inflammation of the tissue on the bottom of the foot," says Alan K. Mauser, DPM, a podiatrist in Louisville, Kentucky. Located on the bottom of the foot, the plantar fascia is a dense band of tissue that covers the bones. This band of tissue, says Dr. Mauser, acts like a bowstring on the bow. "When you're off your foot it's not tight, but when you step down it becomes tight," he says. "Over time a person can develop a strain or inflammation of the fascia into the heel bone, and it becomes a chronic and repetitive condition. One never really rests their foot enough to heal and get better." Plantar fasciitis is usually described as shooting pain in the heel. The condition can also cause some swelling in the heel. While pain from plantar fasciitis can be extremely intense after rest, it usually eases during the day — although it may reappear after exercise or long periods on your feet. Causes and Risk Factors Plantar fasciitis occurs when the plantar fascia becomes tight from too much pressure on the tissue, which leads to inflammation. As tension in the plantar fascia increases, tiny tears form in the tissue. The more tension and tearing that occur in the plantar fascia, the more inflammation and irritation there will be. This buildup of tension and tearing causes plantar fasciitis and results in heel pain. Men between ages 40 and 70 are most likely to experience the condition. There are a number of risk factors that can lead to plantar fasciitis, including: Obesity or sudden weight gain: Excess weight can damage Continue reading >>

Severe Chronic Heel Pain In A Diabetic Patient With Plantar Fasciitis Successfully Treated Through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

Severe Chronic Heel Pain In A Diabetic Patient With Plantar Fasciitis Successfully Treated Through Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

Abstract BACKGROUND: Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a noninvasive brain stimulation technique, was proposed as a suitable method for the treatment of several chronic pain syndromes. We describe a case of severe heel pain in a diabetic patient with plantar fasciitis successfully treated with tDCS. METHODS: The present study investigated whether tDCS treatment could reduce pain and pain-related anxiety in a 65-year-old diabetic man affected by treatment-resistant right heel pain due to plantar fasciitis. The patient underwent five tDCS treatment sessions on 5 consecutive days. Each session consisted of 20-min anodal tDCS over the left primary motor cortex leg area. RESULTS: The neurostimulation protocol induced a decrease in pain intensity and pain-related anxiety that outlasted the stimulation (1 week). Furthermore, the patient stopped the intake of opioid medication. CONCLUSIONS: Therapeutic neuromodulation with tDCS may represent an alternative option for treating severe lower-extremity pain. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Symptoms Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition caused by long-term high blood sugar levels, which causes nerve damage. Some people will not have any symptoms. But for others symptoms may be debilitating. Between 60 and 70 percent of people with diabetes have some form of neuropathy, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Peripheral neuropathy, the most common form of diabetic neuropathy, affects the legs, feet, toes, hands, and arms. Many people do not know that they have diabetes. People unaware of their diabetes may not know what’s causing some of the unusual sensations they’re experiencing. Nerve damage is the result of high levels of blood glucose over long periods of time. It isn’t entirely clear why high glucose levels damage nerves. A number of factors may play a role in nerve fiber damage. One possible component is the intricate interplay between the blood vessels and nerves, according to the Mayo Clinic. Other factors include high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and nerve inflammation. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy usually first appears in the feet and legs, and may occur in the hands and arms later. A common symptom of diabetic peripheral neuropathy is numbness. Sometimes you may be unable to feel your feet while walking. Other times, your hands or feet will tingle or burn. Or it may feel like you’re wearing a sock or glove when you’re not. Sometimes you may experience sudden, sharp pains that feel like an electrical current. Other times, you may feel cramping, like when you’re grasping something like a piece of silverware. You also may sometimes unintentionally drop items you’re holding as a result of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Walking with a wobbly motion or even losing your balance can res Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Heel Pain

The Link Between Diabetes And Heel Pain

Doctors estimate that 30 million people in the United States live with diabetes, a condition in which individuals struggle to regulate blood sugar levels. Of those 30 million, one in four will experience foot problems ranging from neuropathy to reduced circulation. Many will also develop heel pain from heel spurs or plantar fasciitis. Understanding the link between diabetes, heel pain, and other food conditions related to diabetes can help individuals mitigate and prevent damage to the feet, stay active, and minimize pain and complications. Could Diabetes Be the Cause of Your Heel Pain? While the link between diabetes and heel pain isn’t fully understood, numerous studies have established a connection between the two conditions. Foot experts at the Foot and Ankle Specialty Center in Philadelphia state, “Studies have repeatedly shown that diabetics are more prone to developing plantar fasciitis.” Many experts speculate that the link between heel pain and diabetes is correlated with weight. Almost 90% of individuals with diabetes are also overweight, a known risk factor for heel pain and plantar fasciitis. Under ideal circumstances, the plantar fascia, a flexible ligament also known as the foot’s arch, allows the foot to absorb and distribute the impact from walking, jumping, and running. However, excess weight adds additional strain to the fascia, which can result in strain, tears, inflammation, and the development of painful calcium deposits known as heel spurs. Treating Plantar Fasciitis with Type 2 Diabetes While most cases of plantar fasciitis and heel pain can be successfully resolved at home using proven conservative treatment methods, there are a few special considerations you should keep in mind while treating heel pain alongside diabetes. Many foot probl Continue reading >>

Is There A Relationship Between Plantar Fasciitis And Diabetes?

Is There A Relationship Between Plantar Fasciitis And Diabetes?

Question: Hi! Every morning when I wake up I have terrible foot pain. I've done some research and am pretty sure that I have plantar fasciitis. During my research I came across a source that stated that women with diabetes are at a higher risk for plantar fasciitis. Is there any truth to that? Answer: Dear Reader, The research I performed on this topic indicates that no known relationship between plantar fasciitis and diabetes has ever been established. In fact, plantar fasciitis occurs when a long fibrous plantar fascia ligament along the bottom of the foot develops tears in tissue resulting in pain and inflammation. Some of the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis are burning, stabbing, or aching pain in the heel of the foot. The most common cause for plantar fasciitis is an overload of physical activity or exercise. This is commonly seen in athletes who change or increase the difficulty of their exercise. Another cause of plantar fasciitis is arthritis, which makes the elderly women more prone to this condition. Also, wearing incorrect shoe sizes can cause tears in the tissue. Contributing factors include people with high arches, flat feet, and obesity. Diabetes could be a contributing factor with further heel pain and damage, but mostly among the elderly. The current treatment options for plantar fasciitis are changing physical activities, resting the foot, and applying ice. Orthotics can be helpful to promote healing and may be able to reverse it in some cases. I hope that helps! Continue reading >>

Slideshow: What Your Feet Say About Your Health

Slideshow: What Your Feet Say About Your Health

Cold Feet, Many Culprits If your toes are always cold, one reason could be poor blood flow -- a circulatory problem sometimes linked to smoking, high blood pressure, or heart disease. The nerve damage of uncontrolled diabetes can also make your feet feel cold. Other possible causes include hypothyroidism and anemia. A doctor can look for any underlying problems -- or let you know that you simply have cold feet. When feet ache after a long day, you might just curse your shoes. After all, eight out of 10 women say their shoes hurt. But pain that’s not due to sky-high heels may come from a stress fracture, a small crack in a bone. One possible cause: Exercise that was too intense, particularly high-impact sports like basketball and distance running. Also, weakened bones due to osteoporosis increases the risk. Raynaud’s disease can cause toes to turn white, then bluish, and then redden again and return to their natural tone. The cause is a sudden narrowing of the arteries, called vasospasms. Stress or changes in temperature can trigger vasospasms, which usually don’t lead to other health concerns. Raynaud’s may also be related to rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s disease, or thyroid problems. The most common cause of heel pain is plantar fasciitis, inflammation where this long ligament attaches to the heel bone. The pain may be sharpest when you first wake up and put pressure on the foot. Arthritis, excessive exercise, and poorly fitting shoes also can cause heel pain, as can tendonitis. Less common causes include a bone spur on the bottom of the heel, a bone infection, tumor, or fracture. Sometimes the first sign of a problem is a change in the way you walk -- a wider gait or slight foot dragging. The cause may be the slow loss of normal sensation in your feet, br Continue reading >>

Heel Pain: Symptoms & Signs

Heel Pain: Symptoms & Signs

Pain in the heel can result from a number of factors. Abnormalities of the skin, nerves, bones, blood vessels, and soft tissues of the heel can all result in pain. Because of walking and daily movement, we are always at risk for injury or trauma to the heel area. Common causes of pain in the heel include blisters and corns. Plantar fasciitis, inflammation of the "bowstring-like" tissue in the sole of the foot stretching from the heel to the front of the foot, is one condition commonly associated with heel pain. Sometimes diseases that affect other areas of the body, like peripheral vascular disease or arthritis, can also result in pain in the foot or heel. Sever's disease is a cause of heel pain in children that results from injury to the growth plate of the heel bone. Treatments for heel pain depend on the particular cause. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 4/7/2017 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

More in diabetes