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Healthy Pasta For Diabetics

Diabetes Diet Success

Diabetes Diet Success

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 4 years ago when I was 36. I noticed I'd get up to go to the bathroom a couple of times a night, something I'd never done before, and that was the trigger that something was wrong. My doctor ordered lab work, and then I knew. My grandmother had type 2 diabetes, my uncle has it, and now I do. I'm Italian, and I grew up eating rich Italian foods such as ravioli and other homemade pastas. For someone who loves to eat, finding out I had diabetes felt like a cruel trick. But after I was diagnosed, I completely changed my diet and lifestyle. I went to the American Diabetes Association web site, looked up what foods I could eat, and started eating only low-carb foods. I counted carbs: 15 carbs for every snack and 45 for meals. I gave up bread, pasta, even most cheeses. And though I'm not a big exerciser, I got on the treadmill for 30 minutes every night. I lost 50 pounds in about 4 months. The weight just fell off of me. My A1c [a test that shows blood sugar control] went down, and I felt great. But then after 6 months, I got burned out. I missed the big homemade Italian meals my mother and grandmother used to make. So I started cheating on the weekends. Monday morning I'd be back to counting carbs and eating lots of vegetables and protein. But I'd gain a few pounds over the weekend, and lose them during the week. This yo-yoing wasn't healthy. Eventually I just went back to eating whatever food I wanted, like pizza, cheeseburgers, and fries. My A1c shot up to 10. I started getting neuropathy in my feet -- it feels like you have a blister on the inside rather than the outside of your foot. I even had pains in the upper part of my stomach, and I knew I needed to do something. Now I'm trying to eat healthier and lose the weight I gained back. Continue reading >>

Healthy Pasta Recipes | Prevention

Healthy Pasta Recipes | Prevention

Pasta doesn't have to be off-limits when you're trying to stay healthy! With a few smart ingredient swapslow-fat cheeses, whole grain pasta, and loads of veggiesand sensible portions, you can keep your blood sugar down and even rev weight loss. Dig into 10 of our most delicious pasta dishes now! Toss prepared penne with baked leeks, red bell peppers, summer squash, kalamata olives, and salmon for a fresh and light pasta meal. Not only is salmon packed with heart-healthy fats and diabetes-fighting fats, like omega-3s, it may also fight cancer, thanks to the mineral selenium. 1 yellow summer squash, halved and cut into 1/4" slices 1. Preheat the oven to 400F. Prepare the pasta according to package directions. 2. Meanwhile, cut the leeks into 2" lengths and quarter them lengthwise. Rinse the leeks completely. Place the leeks and bell pepper in a 13".9" baking dish. Add the broth, lemon juice, 2 teaspoons of the oil, thyme, and black pepper. Cover with foil and bake for 15 minutes. 3. Add the squash, olives, and salmon to the baking dish and drizzle with the remaining 1 teaspoon oil. Cover and bake for 30 minutes, or until the salmon is opaque and the vegetables are tender. 4. Place the penne in a large serving bowl. Break the salmon into bite-size pieces and add to the penne with the vegetables. Nutritional Info Per Serving 426.6 cal, 18.3 g pro, 67.1 g carb, 5.4 g fiber, 10.2 g fat, 1.8 g sat fat, 226.9 mg sodium Can't imagine lasagna without the ground beef? Go vegetarian without going hungry by adding slices of hearty eggplant. Layered between low-sodium tomato sauce and fat-free ricotta cheese, the eggplant becomes tender and maintains a satisfying texture. Easy, no-cook lasagna noodles make this dish a quick mid-week meal. 2. In a small bowl, mix together the ricotta Continue reading >>

Diabetics & Pasta

Diabetics & Pasta

Most individuals with diabetes are fearful of the great Italian meal simply because of pasta's infamously high carbohydrate content. Nonetheless, with proper meal planning, pasta can be safely incorporated into a diabetic diet. The key is to limit the portion size and to select pastas made from high-fiber whole grains. Diabetes and Carbohydrates Individuals living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes must monitor their carbohydrate intake in order to control their blood sugar. Excessive intake of carbohydrates can lead to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar. When an individual's blood sugar runs high for an extended period of time, it can lead to other medical complications such as compromised eyesight and kidney disease. To avoid hyperglycemia and associated diseases, diabetics should moderate, but not eliminate, their intake of carbohydrate-containing foods, such as pasta. Carbohydrate Content of Pasta As a member of the grains food group, pasta contains a significant amount of starch, a complex form of carbohydrate. One diabetic serving of pasta is 1/3 cup of cooked pasta, or the equivalent of 15 grams of carbohydrate. One serving of pasta also contains fiber, another complex carbohydrate which helps to control blood sugar. Whole-wheat pasta contains the most fiber: roughly 3 to 5 grams of fiber per serving. Incorporating Pasta into a Healthy Diabetic Diet According to the American Diabetes Association, most diabetics may consume 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. As a carbohydate-containing food, pasta is safe to consume when following a diabetic diet; however, because 1/3 cup equals 15 grams of carbohydrate, the amount of pasta in one meal should not exceed 1 cup, or 45 grams of carbohydrate. Additional sauces such as marinara and Alfredo contain minimal amounts of Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes?

Yes, you can eat pasta if you have diabetes. Pasta is a source of carbohydrate with 1/3 cup cooked pasta containing 15 grams of carbohydrate (1 carb choice). One third cup of pasta is not a lot of pasta therefore a couple suggestions are to: 1) use two or three of your carbohydrate servings for pasta (2/3 to 1 cup of pasta); and 2) add low carbohydrate vegetables such as cooked, broccoli, carrots, zucchini squash, and green beans to your pasta dish to increase the volume of food without adding more carbohydrate to your meal. Serve your pasta and steamed vegetables with a lean protein choice (baked fish, beef tenderloin, or boneless, skinless chicken breast. You can most definitely eat pasta if you are diabetic. However there are specific guidelines you should follow in order to keep blood sugars normal: Use whole wheat pasta that is enriched with fiber. This will slow down the digestion and not cause your blood sugars to rise as rapidly. Choose a lean meat or protein to accompany the pasta. Be sure to watch portion control and do not exceed 30-45 gm Carb from your pasta. Usually 2/3 cup pasta is a great portion! Be sure to meet with a Registered Dietitian to calculate exactly how many Carbs per meal you should consume. Think comforting bowls of pasta are off the menu because you have diabetes? Think again. Whole-grain pastas are a great source of B vitamins and fiber, and reduce inflammation in the blood vessels. However, this food does come with a couple warning flags. First, overcooking pasta raises its glycemic load (follow the package directions and pull the pasta off the heat when it's al dente). Second, beware of portion size. A good bet is to pair 1/2 to 1 cup of cooked pasta with a bevy of vegetables and a bit of lean protein and healthy fat for a dish that's ea Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Having diabetes does NOT mean that if you like or love pasta, you will now have to give it up…nope, it does not. It DOES however mean that you should be choosier about the types of pasta you eat, your portion size and maybe how often you include pasta with your meals. We all need carbohydrates in our diet—it provides our bodies with the necessary fuel to keep us going. The critical question is how much and what kind of carbohydrate. Whole Grain Pasta versus Regular Pasta Whole grain pasta in general has lower calories, more fiber and more nutrients than regular pasta made from refined flour. Refining strips fiber, vitamins and minerals from the grain (usually wheat grain) and in return, you get a softer, smoother texture. 1 serving (1 cup) of whole grain pasta contains 174 calories, 37 grams of carbohydrate and 6.3 grams of fiber as compared to a serving of regular pasta with 221 calories, 43 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. That extra fiber in whole grain pasta (with fewer carbohydrates) can slow down the absorption of sugars from your digestive tract and this can mean that your blood sugars will not spike as much as they might with regular pasta. In addition, whole wheat pasta has a glycemic load of 15 while regular pasta has a glycemic load of 23. In both whole wheat pasta and regular pasta, about 80% of the calories are derived from carbohydrates.[1], [2] Put all this together and serving for serving, whole grain pasta gives you more fiber, more nutrients, fewer calories and fewer carbohydrates than regular pasta, making whole grain pasta a better choice, overall. Also, you can always opt for non-wheat based pasta such as corn, quinoa or rice-based pastas. I advise you to read the following diet tips for diabetes: Portion Size All the numbers given ab Continue reading >>

6 Great Low-carb Pastas (and 1 To Avoid!)

6 Great Low-carb Pastas (and 1 To Avoid!)

Well there are plenty low-carb bread options out there nowadays–we keep adding to this list of great low-carb breads–but what do you do about those pasta cravings? While a traditional slice of bread will pack 16 grams of carbs or more per slice, a serving of pasta is no joke! At 40+ grams of carbs for one cup of pasta, it is not easy on the blood sugar! Fortunately, the creators of food are listening to your demands, because more and more low-carb pasta choices continue to pop up. Here are 6 great low-carb pasta choices that we’ve found so far: 1. Black Bean Pasta from ExploreAsian, Gluten-Free: This pasta is a favorite of mine because it’s gluten-free, it cooks really fast (in about 5 to 7 minutes) and it holds together. Oh wait, did I mention the only ingredients are black beans and water? Very clean and very healthy! After subtracting the 12 grams of dietary fiber from the total carbohydrates, you’re left with 5 grams of very low-impact carbohydrates! Feel free to have two servings at that count! 2. Adzuki Bean Pasta from ExploreAsian, Gluten-Free: This one has a different flavor than it’s black bean counterpart, and has twice as many carbs. But at 11 grams of carbs per serving, that’s still a lot fewer carbs than traditional pasta. You could even mix this pasta into the pot of boiling water with the black bean pasta to change things up and reduce the carbs in your bowl at the same time. (This company has some higher carb bean pasta variations, too!) 3. Dreamfields Low-Carb Pasta: Now this pasta really comes down to the individual. The company says they’ve created this whole-wheat pasta in a way that won’t impact your blood sugar significantly, “Its blend of fiber and plant proteins helps create a pasta that offers many healthy benefits while stil Continue reading >>

The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud

The Dreamfields Pasta Fraud

Dreamfields pasta is promoted as a low carb product. But it’s made from durum wheat and it tastes great. Actually, it looks, feels and tastes just like… regular pasta. Now, regular pasta is anything but low carb. It’s mostly starch, which turns into glucose in the gut and is absorbed as blood sugar. Exactly what low carbers try to avoid. Dreamfields pasta has 41 grams of carbs per serving. How can that be low carb? Well, Dreamfields claim that their “patent-pending” (since 2004) recipe and manufacturing process protects the carb from being digested. It sounds fantastic. But is it true? I decided to find out and the results were shocking. A beautiful tale Can you be a low carber and eat all the pasta you want? Can you have your (low carb) cake and eat it too? It sounds too good to be true, and two questions pop up: If their “patent-pending” manufacturing really made the starch indigestible, would that not affect the taste? (It’s great). If the starch really became indigestible, should it not end up being digested by bacteria in the large intestine, causing massive flatulence? (It does not). Now it’s time for answers. The package Here’s my package of Dreamfields pasta, bought in a “low carb” store. Let’s take a closer look. Big promises Basically the idea is that the carbs will pass straight through your body: Side There you have it: 36 grams of non-fiber carbs per 56 gram serving. It adds up to about 80 percent energy from carbs. That’s about as high carb a food as you could find. Of course – most of it is supposedly indigestible. I tested the pasta myself, eating it and testing my blood sugar 21 times. We’ll get to the test shortly. A good idea? It may sound too good to be true. But even if it was true, consider if it really is a good ide Continue reading >>

Pasta Substitutes Available For People With Diabetes

Pasta Substitutes Available For People With Diabetes

Pasta Substitutes Available for People With Diabetes Pasta Substitutes Available for People With Diabetes By Stacey Hugues | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Most of us love pastawhat's not to love? The soft textured noodles take on any flavor and give us a sense of comfort, but pasta is also loaded with carbohydrates, which, when eaten in excess, can increase inflammation, cause weight gain, and elevate blood sugars. If you must eat pasta, choose whole grain, such as whole wheat, because itwill help to increase your fiber, vitamins, and minerals and, if portion controlled, can possibly reduce how quickly blood sugars spike (when compared to white pasta). If on the other hand, you are willing to try some substitutes, think outside the box. Today, there are so many varieties of grains and grain substitutes. For example, did you know that they make a pasta with chickpeas? It's higher in protein and gluten-free. Other gluten-free varieties exist, and some pastas have added protein and omega-3 fatty acids. You can also make your own 'mock' pasta by using different types of grains or vegetables. Give some of these a tryyou'll be shocked by how many options you have. Whole Wheat, Fortified Pasta, and Gluten Free Alternatives Sian Irvine/Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images Surprisingly similar in texture to al dente white pasta,a 1/3 cup serving of cookedwhole wheat pastahas threetimes the amount of fiber as white pasta, making it a better option for glucose control. Fortified pasta varieties are another alternative to white pasta These pastas have been modified byadding a flour blend that includes egg whites and legumes for more protein; barley and oats for increasedfiber; and flaxseed for healthy omega-3 fats.These pastas contain 40 percent more protein and twice the fiber in Continue reading >>

8 Diabetes-friendly Pasta Recipes

8 Diabetes-friendly Pasta Recipes

Pass the pasta If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have assumed that your pasta-eating days were over. Depending on your situation, that's not necessarily true. For some, bread and pasta can still be a part of a diabetes-friendly diet if you limit portions, follow the right recipes, and work them into the recommendations set by your dietitian. Talk to your doctor or dietitian about how your blood sugar may react after a pasta meal—the effect can be highly individual, so it's not a bad idea to test your blood sugar after eating to see how you react. Linguine With Pepper Sauce The star of this dish is the sauce: Red bell peppers, olive oil, fresh garlic, basil, and balsamic vinegar are sautéed and then put into the blender together to create a sauce that's packed with vitamin C and fiber. Yum! Ingredients: Olive oil, cooking spay, red bell pepper, garlic, fresh basil, balsamic vinegar, salt, black pepper, uncooked linguine Calories: 117 Try this recipe: Linguine with Red Pepper Sauce Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Your whole family will love this one-pan meal. (And if you're eating alone, it works great as leftovers.) Spaghetti is baked with a mixture of onions, garlic, tomatoes, and seasoning, and is topped with reduced-fat cheddar cheese. Chicken breast adds lean protein. Swap in whole-wheat spaghetti for an even healthier meal. Ingredients: Uncooked spaghetti, cooking spray, onion, garlic, stewed tomatoes, low-sodium Worcestershire sauce, Italian seasoning, salt, reduced-fat cheddar cheese, frozen cooked chicken Calories: 395 Try this recipe: Cheesy Chicken Spaghetti Basil Scallops with Spinach Fettuccine A 3-ounce serving of scallops sets you back just 95 calories and less than a gram of fat—and pumps you up with an impressive 17 grams of protein. Scallops are also a Continue reading >>

Best Pasta For Diabetics

Best Pasta For Diabetics

We ALL love pasta, right?! It's just one of those foods that is such a comfort food. I know for me it's always been like that BUT I also know that because it is such a comfort food it is VERY easy to over eat it! Seriously…I know there have been times when I've eaten an enormous bowl and still gone back for more. SOund familiar? But when you're a diabetic it's not really possible to eat an enormous bowl of pasta because you will soon see your blood sugar sky rocketing. And even if you're not diabetic, you will soon see those pounds stacking on if you over consume the carbs! So let's go over some facts and talk about the best pasta options for diabetics. Pasta Nutrition Facts Let's compare the nutrition facts for 1 serving of pasta. One serving is equivalent to half a cup. As you can see from these comparisons there is between 18-22 g total carbs and between 15-20 net carbs. If you're confused about carb counting, check out our easy tutorial over here. Realistic Serving Sizes These images show the reality of pasta servings. The first one is only half a cup and as you can see it doesn't really amount to much when put on a normal sized dinner plate. Then we have what might be someones typical serving of pasta (if not more). In the second image we see about 3 times as much, so 3 serves of white spaghetti like this amounts to 64.8 g total carbohydrates. Too Many Carbs I love using visual comparisons because it really lets you see the difference. While you could try to justify that eating whole wheat spaghetti would be okay with 2 serves being around 30 g net carbs, over the long term this is just too many carbs and you will find you can't control your blood sugar properly. So What's The Best Pasta For Diabetics? Sure, the traditional pasta might not be the best pasta for d Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Carbohydrates – Yes, You Can Eat Pasta!

Diabetes And Carbohydrates – Yes, You Can Eat Pasta!

By Christina Zavaglia, MHSc, RD, CDE We’re thrilled to introduce Christina Zavaglia, a registered dietitian and trained certified diabetes educator. We asked Christina to tackle the myth of carbohydrates specifically pertaining to diabetes. It’s a common question asked to us about our pasta. She breaks down the components of managing diabetes and the necessity for a healthy diet versus a ‘special’ diet that people with diabetes feel they have to follow. Eating healthy is an important component of diabetes management but it is a myth that people with diabetes need to eat a “special” diet. In fact, “a diabetic diet” is just a healthy diet, and healthy eating is for everyone. For someone living with diabetes, no foods need to be off limits however portion control of carbohydrates and moderation of less healthy foods is important. Living with diabetes people sometimes believe they should avoid carbohydrates, this is not true! Carbohydrates are our bodies main source of energy and are found in grain products, legumes (such as chickpeas, kidney beans, and lentils), fruits, some vegetables, and some dairy products – these foods are all great sources of a variety of vitamins and minerals and you do not want to do your body a disservice by excluding them. Chickapea pasta is made from only organic red lentils and chickpeas and is a source of carbohydrates as well as rich in iron, folate, thiamine, fiber and protein, all of which are all essential for good health. Fiber and protein are also very filling which means that you can fill up on a smaller portion and feel satisfied. Eating a high-fiber diet can help manage blood sugar. Diabetes Canada recommends that people living with diabetes consume between 25-50 g of fiber per day*. Fiber is considered a carbohydrat Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Eat Pasta Here S How | Diabetic Connect

Diabetics Can Eat Pasta Here S How | Diabetic Connect

What if a diabetes diagnosis didnt have to mean throwing out all the pasta in your pantry? Well, it doesnt. Many with diabetes choose to eliminate pasta from their diet, because all those carbs can do some serious damage to your blood sugar. But if youre smart about which pasta you select, what you add to it, and how you cook it, you may still be able to include pasta dishes in your diabetes diet. According to research from Dr. Denise Robertson at the University of Surrey, cooking, cooling, and reheating your pasta before eating it can change the way your body reacts to this carb-heavy food. Like most carbohydrates, pasta is a starch. When starches are broken down in your gut, they get absorbed as simple sugars, which makes blood sugars soar. When you cook pasta and then cool it down before eating, some of these starches are transformed into a resistant starch through a process called retrogradation. Resistant starches are absorbed into your bloodstream in a different way, acting like soluble fiber that is resistant to digestion and passes through the digestive tract without transforming into a simple sugar. In a small clinical trial , Dr. Chris van Tulleken tested this and found that those who ate pasta that had been cooked, cooled, and reheated had a significantly lower rise in blood sugar than those who ate fresh, hot pasta. Everybodys diabetes is different, so its hard to say how your body will react to this pasta cooking method. We asked members in a discussion question whether anyone had tried it out. While some seemed skeptical and others found that even resistant starches caused problems for them, there were a couple who said they try to include resistant starches in their regular diet. If you want to try out the cook, cool, and reheat pasta method , make some Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

Can A Diabetic Eat Spaghetti?

After a diabetes diagnosis, your may fear you have to give up your favorite carbohydrate-rich meals like spaghetti and other pastas. Although it’s true that you need to keep careful watch over how many carbs, calories and fat you take in, you can accommodate an occasional serving of spaghetti. Make sure your eating is always within the context of a healthy, carb-balanced meal plan and that you are following the advice of your doctor or dietitian. You can also make small changes to your traditional spaghetti dish that make it just as palatable but reduce the impact on your blood sugar. Video of the Day Is Spaghetti OK? “The short answer to the pasta question is yes, you can eat pasta,” writes registered dietitian Cindy Moore on EatBetterAmerica.com. People with diabetes do not need to give up their favorite spaghetti meals. In fact, it’s important to have carbohydrates such as pasta at each meal. The “but” is you must ensure you are adhering the eating plan created by your doctor or dietitian. Spaghetti is “carbalicious,” and eating too much can spike your blood sugar. To keep it balanced, be sure to always eat the appropriate amount of carbohydrate servings when you have spaghetti. The nutrition facts on the spaghetti package will tell you how many carbohydrates are in a serving. A cup of cooked plain spaghetti without sauce has roughly 43 g of carbohydrates. If that’s more than your allowance of carbohydrates per meal, you can reduce your portion size, to 1/3 or 2/3 of a cup. Remember that the sauce will add more carbohydrates — close to 18 g for a typical 1/2 cup of tomato-based sauce. In addition, if you make meatballs with carbohydrate-containing items like breadcrumbs, that’s an additional carbohydrate source you need to account for. Choosing Continue reading >>

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