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Healthy Late Night Snacks For Diabetics

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes Small Snacks

Healthy snack ideas for people with type 2 diabetes Small Snacks If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, youll find many healthy ideas below. Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canadas Food Guide . The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Heres a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate -rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats , barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL ( cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL ( cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 1 single-serve (125 mL) unsweetened applesauce sp Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Friendly Snacks

10 Diabetes Friendly Snacks

How many times do we all get the munchies after the evening meal and need a lil something to snack on? ALL THE TIME!! Am I right? Do you think diabetes friendly (DF) snacks = no taste? Think again!! Here’s a list to spark ideas- be sure to check with your meal plan and/or dietitian to make sure you are getting the proper carb amount. Check out the video below for some diabetes-friendly snacks that are full of flavor: No compatible source was found for this media. Popcorn- popcorn is considered a good source of whole grain fiber and scores high on the satisfying-to-snack-on scale! Try to limit excess butter and salt on your popcorn by sprinkling on alternative seasonings like nutritional yeast, cinnamon (very diabetes friendly), cumin, chili powder,etc. Check out this recipe for “Dorito” or Taco Popcorn at wholenewmom.com. Looks delish! 3 cups of popped popcorn equals about 15gm carb or go with only 1 cup popcorn for around 5gm carb. Soup- Soup is a great way to get filled up- especially on cold winter nights. Cook up a pot of lower carb veggie/beef soup from today.com (think lean beef, tomatoes, cabbage, carrots, green beans,etc.) and add in your favorite herbs and spices for a boost of antioxidants and flavor. Freeze your soup in 1 cup amounts to make it easy to pop it in the microwave and -boom- instant snack. Depending on the veggies you use, a 1 cup serving will equal 10-20 gms of carbs. 1/2 sandwich- Make yourself a sandwich with your wheat bread or a lower carb tortilla and stuff it full of veggies and add some turkey or chicken and a shot of mustard for a satisfying PM nosh. Depending on your bread or wrap choice this will run you anywhere from 10-15gm carb. Check out some of the cloud bread recipes out there in cyberspace for an even lower carb count. Frui Continue reading >>

Got The Night Munchies? Beware Diabetes And Heart Disease

Got The Night Munchies? Beware Diabetes And Heart Disease

How many of us can honestly say that we've never raided the fridge at 3 a.m., egged on by an uncontrollable hunger for ice-cream? Doing this once or twice is fine, but new research says that if you make this a habit, you could be in trouble. Late-night snacking is a strange habit, and there are various theories as to why so many of us are inclined to raid our cupboards and fridges past our bedtime. One study has suggested that our craving for certain types of food — those rich in starch, salt, and sugars — late in the evening may be explained by our ancestors' needs. The study authors explained that early humans did not know when and where their next meal would come from, so binge eating late in the day where possible allowed their bodies to store the energy needed for survival. But now, our snacks are driven more by pleasure than by necessity, so their effects are much less wholesome. Researchers agree that caving in to your munchies and eating late in the evening leads to negative health outcomes, such as a heightened risk of obesity. This may not only be tied to the snacks' nutritional value, though; it might also be linked to how our bodies are programmed to work, and how our circadian — or internal — clocks function. Our bodies are adjusted to the natural day-night cycle, and so they tell us when we should eat, sleep, and be active. If the circadian clock is ignored, health and well-being are also impacted. For instance, it was found that eating outside the normal waking and activity hours may cause excess weight gain. And now, emerging research from the National Autonomous University of Mexico in Mexico City suggests that late-night eaters may also be predisposed to diabetes and heart disease. The study, which was led by Prof. Ruud Buijs, suggested that "u Continue reading >>

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Curb Hunger At Night With Type 2 Diabetes

Whenever I meet with patients for the first time, I always ask them to “take me through a typical day” describing the foods they eat and meal patterns they follow. Often I will hear something like this: “Well I’m not of a breakfast person…” “So is the first time you eat, lunch?” “…well sometimes I don’t eat lunch either.” “If you do eat lunch, what will it be?” “Oh a sandwich or something quick…maybe some chips.” “Ok, so how about dinner?” “A meat, a vegetable and a potato…or sometimes something quick like a pizza.” “Ok, do you snack after dinner?” “Well, see that’s my problem…” Touche. It certainly is a problem, especially when they go on to describe what the evening snacking routine consists of. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not celery and carrot sticks. So what is the deal with eating at night? How can we avoid nighttime eating? Or more importantly, nighttime overeating? I've got plenty of tips for you to consider. 3 Reasons NOT To Munch Out At Night First things first. Whatever you've heard about not eating after a certain time (I’ve heard 5 pm, 6 pm, 8 pm) because everything turns into fat, is just not supported by research. While it IS the case that, generally speaking, the body is more efficient at burning calories when it needs them (ie during the day), compared to when we're sedentary, the rule about a specific time of day is not substantiated by research. That said, I strongly discourage eating much in the evening for the following reasons: 1. Most people make relatively poor food choices in the evening. This is likely due to poor inhibition – we are less likely to make smart choices as our bodies and minds fatigue at the end of the day. Or it's often due to making up for insufficient food intake thr Continue reading >>

Late Night Munchies | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Late Night Munchies | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Please could someone help with suggestions with late night snacks. I have been a diabetic for 9 years, 4 of which have been insulin dependent (injections). I am trying to lose weight but struggle with late night munchies. Can anyone suggest a snack that will not give me a high blood sugar reading the next morning? For example, this morning, my blood sugar reading this morning was 15.0 which was very disappointing (and scary). I ate a healthy meal last night but got really peckish later on and ate several (okay, a lot of) cornichon gherkins. I have also tried Melba Thins with 2 triangles of light Laughing Cow cheese. My blood sugar for that morning was 16.3. I am anxious to get my blood sugar to below 10 in the morning and 8 in the evening. Any ideas for snacks would be gratefully appreciated. Hard boiled eggs, avocado, cold cuts, cheese. roasted beans are good and very filling with very little carb. I like a chunck of cheeder as well also filling high fat but wont raise your sugars, tins of tuna are good for that as well. avoid bicsuits and crackers as they are all carb no anything else. if you want cheese just eat the cheese on its own! almonds and peanuts are also good? are you doing low carb high fat? I have 150g of defrosted tesco mixed berries with a weight watchers layered fromage frais mixed in, it equates to about 15 carbs and feels like a real treat especially if the berries are warm and the fromage frais is nice and cold. You can cut down the ammount of berries if necessary. I am type 2 though. Or I may have 4 squares of Lindt 90% dark chocolate, only about 4 carbs in all. Please could someone help with suggestions with late night snacks. I Continue reading >>

The Downside Of Late-night Eating

The Downside Of Late-night Eating

If you’re a night owl, you might be interested to know that your late-night eating habits could impact your health — and not in a good way. Pretty much everyone at one point or another has had a late dinner or indulged in some snacking while watching television or catching up on the day’s work. Some people don’t sleep well at night and may turn to food to try to help them catch some shut-eye. While staying up until the wee hours and noshing may be a routine for you, it might be time to take a second look at these habits that perhaps aren’t so healthy. Eating late at night: Can affect your weight. Contrary to popular belief, eating late at night doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll gain weight. What dictates weight gain is how many calories you consume over the course of the entire day, not necessarily when you consume those calories. However, you could end up gaining weight based on the types of foods you may be reaching for as you catch up on Game of Thrones. Potato chips, cheese and crackers, ice cream, cookies… all of these are calorie-laden treats that are surefire ways to pack on the pounds compared to snacks that you might choose during the day: fruit, yogurt, nuts, etc. In addition, it’s easy to go overboard with food portions at night, especially when you get caught up in television or work. Mindless eating kicks in and before you know it, you’ve polished off that bag of Doritos. Can impact your blood sugars. What and how much you eat can directly affect your blood sugars both overnight and the next morning, especially if your snack choices are mostly carbohydrate foods, like crackers, chips, or fruit. Your diabetes medicine may not completely “cover” excessive eating at night and you may be unpleasantly surprised the next morning when yo Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

There are lot many choices available for your request, but for now I’ll suggest one of them, that is POPCORN We all love popcorn, and fortunately popcorn has high nutritive value and highly beneficial as a food item only if we don;t ruin it with toppings such as sugar, salt, butter, caramel, etc. Plain air popped popcorn is the best choice for diabetics and it is recommended to have it as is. If at all you want to have some toppins (but only occasionally) you can add cinnamon, black pepper or red chilli powder (only a pinch of anyone of these). Other than this, plain air popped popcorn has low fat content, low sugar content, high dietary fibers, high fullness factor and low calories which makes it a very ideal snack to munch on. The ideal serving size, nutritional assessment and other discussions related to popcorn can be appreciated here: Thanks! Continue reading >>

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

The Best Midnight Snacks For Diabetes Management

1 / 7 Midnight Snacking Isn't Off Limits If You Have Diabetes Midnight snacking doesn’t typically have the healthiest connotations. But being hungry late at night doesn’t mean you have to derail your diabetes diet by standing in front of the refrigerator spooning ice cream out of the tub, as delicious as that may sound. In fact, satisfying a late-night craving with a healthy snack may be good for diabetes. That’s because fasting for too long can, in some cases, make the liver overproduce glucose, which can raise blood sugar — an effect that can be harmful for people with type 2 diabetes, says Lori Chong, RDN, CDE, at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus. Next time you have a hankering for something salty, savory, or sweet, get your hands on one of these diabetes-friendly snacks to ward off hunger and help you get back to sleep. Continue reading >>

Why You Shouldn't Eat Late At Night, According To Science

Why You Shouldn't Eat Late At Night, According To Science

Why you shouldn't eat late at night, according to science Science says you need to stop your late night snackingCredit:Corbis As well as contributing to weight gain, a new study has suggested that snacking late at night could increase your risk of diabetes and heart disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that eating late a night raises glucose and insulin levels, both of which are causes of type 2 diabetes. They also found evidence that poor timing of meals can also affect cholesterol levels which can increase the risk of heart disease or suffering a heart attack. Eating later can promote a negative profile of weight, energy and hormone markers The researchers asked nine adults of a healthy weight to eat three meals and two snacks between 8am and 7pm for eight weeks and then asked the same but between noon and 11pm for another eight weeks. To control for sleep, the researchers asked participants to sleep between 11pm to 9am for both of the eight weeks. They found that when participants ate later at night not only did their weight increase, but so did their levels of insulin, glucose and cholesterol. They also found that during the first eight weeks of daytime eating, participants produced a hormone which stimulates the appetite to help them feel fuller for longer. Midnight snacking could have a detrimental affect on your healthCredit:Alamy Namni Goel, lead author of the study, said: "These early findings, which control for sleep, give a more comprehensive picture of the benefits of eating earlier in the same. "Eating later can promote a negative profile of weight, energy and hormone markers - such as higher glucose and insulin, which are implicated in diabetes, and cholesterol and triglycerides, which are linke Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

(ISTOCKPHOTO/HEALTH)When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Check out our five favorite snacks for diabetics. Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, you’ll find many healthy ideas below. What is a healthy snack? Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide. The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Here’s a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate-rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats, barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Mid-day snacks Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL (¾ cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL (½ cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus On-the-go snacks These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers 1 single-s Continue reading >>

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