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8 Tips For A Healthy Heart

8 Tips For A Healthy Heart

Follow these tips to ward off heart disease Think of your heart as a metronome. It keeps the beat to your bodys daily functions, pushing blood near and far to nourish every cell and fiber. As a powerhouse organ, youll want to keep your heart in tip-top shape, especially because diabetes can up your risk for heart disease. Here, Laurence Sperling, MD, FACC, FACP, FAHA, professor of medicine in cardiology, director of the Emory Heart Disease Prevention Center in Atlanta, and chair of the American College of Cardiologys Cardiometabolic Disease Prevention Committee, shares eight tips for keeping your heart healthy: Exercise more. You dont have to run five miles daily to get a good workout. Just taking more steps, if youre counting, can have a benefit. The muscles are involved in the utilization of glucose, so regular moderate exercise is critical to individuals with diabetes in terms of treating their diabetes and cardiovascular risk, Sperling says. Its important to build some regular activity into your life. Sit less. Many of us spend our days in a seated positionwhether at work, driving, watching TV, or using a computer. A recent paper basically said that if youre sedentary more than 10 hours a day, that correlates with risk for vascular disease, says Sperling. You may have to get creative to reduce your sitting time. Maybe going for a stroll around the office every 60 or 90 minutes is an option. Or ask your employer to consider standing desks, treadmill desks, or pedal work stations. Eat well. The Mediterranean diet, the Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes diet, and the DASH diet all have benefits for people with diabetes, Sperling says. They are anti-inflammatory, sustainable, and they are diets that allow a lot of variation in terms of being creative with what you eat. Slas Continue reading >>

My Bizzy Kitchen Diabetic Friendly Recipes

My Bizzy Kitchen Diabetic Friendly Recipes

Lets start this day off with finding out who the winners are of my birthday giveaway! First up is Jessicas cookbook, The Pretty Dish . Happy birthday greetings from Mussouri The winner of the Trader Joes spices . . . Happy belated birthday from Central Illinois. And finally, the winner of the grill pan . . . Congrats! Send me your mailing address to [email protected] Thanks for everyone who wished me a happy birthday on that post. Why do I always forget how long beef keeps me full when I eat it for breakfast? Three ounces of beef (3) with an egg white with spinach topped with Trader Joes lite mozzarella (1) and bananas and granola on the side for dessert (2). This was so tasty! If you follow my Instastories on Instagram, than you would have seen that I cooked up shrimp and noodles before work, and just put them in a container and threw it in my backpack. I knew I could accessorize my lunch with either the hot bar or salad bar at Marianos, and I needed to get a couple condiments for work. Well, the hot bar was a bust can you believe no fresh steamed veggies?! So I walked over to the salad bar and got shredded carrots, cabbage and chick peas for $1.12. I need to add photos back into this post, but I used this stir fry sauce buy it if you can find it its only 5 calories a tablespoon! I also added a bit of Tabasco sriracha , um, not sure how I didnt know about that product! I threw the shrimp, noodles and veggies in a big bowl and cooked in the microwave for 1 1/2 minutes. The veggies were still crisp tender, then I tossed in the stir fry sauce, drizzled with the Tabasco sriracha, and sprinkled with everything but the bagel seasoning. Yum! Best part? The only points for this meal really was the noodles, which were only 4 points still counting 1 point for the sauce, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

Diabetic Neuropathy—the Agony Of Da Feet

[Editor’s note: In recognition of American Diabetes Month, Harvard Health Publications is collaborating with MSN.com on its Stop Diabetes initiative. Today’s post, published on World Diabetes Day, is the first of several focusing on this all-too-common disorder.] People tend to think of diabetes as a silent, painless condition. Don’t tell that to the millions of folks with diabetes-induced tingling toes or painful feet. This problem, called diabetic neuropathy, can range from merely aggravating to disabling or even life threatening. It’s something I have first-hand (or, more appropriately, first-foot) knowledge about. High blood sugar, the hallmark of diabetes, injures nerves and blood vessels throughout the body. The first nerves to be affected tend to be the smallest ones furthest from the spinal cord—those that stretch to the toes and feet. Diabetic neuropathy affects different people in different ways. I feel it as a tingling in my toes. Moving my feet and wiggling my toes helps the tingling disappear for a while. Others have it much worse. Diabetic neuropathy can cause a constant burning feeling in the feet; sharp pain that may be worse at night; and extreme sensitivity to touch, making the weight of a sheet unbearable. It can be sneaky, too, and completely rob the feet of their ability to sense pain. The truly scary thing about diabetic neuropathy is a 10-letter word we usually associate with horrific accidents or Civil War battlefields—amputation. When sensory nerves in the feet become damaged, a blister, cut, or sore can go unnoticed, allowing time for the wound to become infected. Infections that cause tissue to die (gangrene) and that spread to the bone may be impossible to treat with cleansing and antibiotics. Diabetes accounts for about 70,000 lo Continue reading >>

My Cure: Diabetes Forecast

My Cure: Diabetes Forecast

So here I am with my escape, a viola that I couldnt be luckier to be able to speak through. It lets me be me without the needles. My endocrinologist recently remarked that its ironic that Im on medication for anxiety while I spend a large portion of my life onstage, as a performing musician. As if, for everyone, a performance automatically induces anxiety. As if it couldnt do something for me. As if it couldnt numb me while at the same time ripping me open and letting me out. I could succumb to diabetes and be a mindless pincushion of needles and fingers dripping blood and the burn of high blood sugars and the fearfear not of the disease itself but of being only this disease. Being trapped under its soundproof curtain. The true fear for me isnt death or diabetes complications; its being trapped inside the disease. So here I am with my escape, a viola that I couldnt be luckier to be able to speak through. It lets me be me without the needles. My anxiety isnt about performance but about being able to tear off the label of diabetic that Im so often covered by and allowing myself to say anything I want to, to be anyone I want to be. What scares me is when my blood glucose is high and my fingers dont grip the strings, and sometimes when Im low and know the notes but not the rhythm, and my mind flips to pieces trying to find the piece I love and put it back together again, and it cant. What scares me is when I have something to say through music but I am physically incapable of saying it. Recently, I played an audition with a low blood sugar. I downed more than one juice box before I went in, but I was still low. My head was blank and I felt like I was thinking thoughtless thoughts. My hands were numb. Before I began playing, I lifted up my viola and stared at my hands and s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Tips From Dr. Natalie Strand

Diabetes Management Tips From Dr. Natalie Strand

Those living with diabetes may find it a challenge to stay healthy—everyone can have conflicts when searching for the right balance of healthy habits, such as exercise, eating well and keeping your teeth and gums clean. From stress to self-care, life can be up and down when living with diabetes. Dr. Natalie Strand (winner of season 17 of “The Amazing Race”) knows this firsthand—she lives with type 1 diabetes. Check out her tips for staying healthy and leading a balanced life while managing diabetes: Ask for help! When I was getting married, I asked each of my bridesmaids to remind me to check my blood sugar [blood glucose] throughout the day and to remind me to eat snacks. I knew I would be distracted, and having a team helped to keep me on track. Go ahead and ask your siblings, team mates and friends to help keep you on track! Communicate with your care team. Make sure you connect with your diabetes educator, physician, dietitian and other health care professionals. Reach out to them with your questions, since they can often help to implement subtle changes to avoid completely overhauling your lifestyle and routine because of diabetes. Get involved. Get a local group together to fundraise, vent or just understand each other. Groups such as your local American Diabetes Association field office, TuDiabetes and BeyondType1 offer ways to connect with others living with diabetes in person or on social media. Connecting with the diabetes community can be a powerful way to help ease the burden of living with this disease. Keep doing what you love. Just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to give up things you enjoy. Make efforts to continue sports, travel and other hobbies, even if there is a learning curve to adapting with diabetes at first. Maintain go Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Blogs Of The Year

We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high-quality information. If you would like to tell us about a blog, nominate them by emailing us at [email protected]! Diabetes is one of the largest health issues facing Americans today. More than 29 million adults in the U.S. have diabetes — and almost one quarter of them don’t know they have it. A further 86 million adults in the U.S. have prediabetes, a condition which increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A whopping 90 percent of these people are unaware of that, too. Both forms of diabetes — type 1 and type 2 — are chronic conditions, meaning they require a lifetime of careful treatment to be properly managed. If left untreated or improperly managed, diabetes can cause serious health complications. For those living with diabetes, the condition can be isolating and take up a significant amount of time as well as mental and emotional energy. Staying on top of your treatments can also be challenging, as everyday things can make a big impact on blood glucose readings, and treatment options are always changing. That’s why we’ve rounded up the best diabetes blogs out there. Whether you’re looking for recipes, resources, treatment options, or simple tips for living well, you’re sure to find something here for you. Diabetes Self-Management Blog Diabetes Self-Management has provided health information to the diabetes community for over 35 years. Their companion blog rounds up tips and info from both healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes. Posts range from hard-hitting news to tips and information you can use, like busting myths about grain. There are also personal stories, to Continue reading >>

Understanding Mesothelioma Cancer

Understanding Mesothelioma Cancer

I get the following question a lot so I thought it would be ideal to make it the highlight of this article.What is mesothelioma? Mesothelioma (also known to be called malignant mesothelioma) is a fairly rare form of cancer that affects the mesothelium. Mesothelium… mesothelioma… you see the connection. The mesothelium is the thin tissue layer that lines (covers) most internal organs. Mesothelioma can be very aggressive and deadly in its attacks, and although treatments are available for its early stages, progression into more chronic stages will result in certain death. Types of Mesothelioma There are different types of mesothelioma based on the particular organ affected. The common types are pleural mesothelioma (which affects the lungs), peritoneal mesothelioma (which affects the abdomen), pericardial mesothelioma (which affects the heart), and less frequently, testicular mesothelioma (which affects the lining of testicles). The most common form of mesothelioma is that of the lungs (pleural mesothelioma), while the peritoneal,pericardial, and testicular forms are rare. Mesothelioma Causes Medical research has shown that mesothelioma is caused by exposure to asbestos. Asbestos are a group of naturally occurring minerals that have been recognized for their strength and fire resistance. Its fire retardant qualities made the use of asbestos common in products such as roofing materials, cements and even fabric. Over the past few decades however, its use has greatly declined in the manufacturing of these products since it has been implicated as the principal culprit causing mesothelioma. Prolonged exposure to asbestos is known to greatly increase the risk of contracting the disease. According to the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), almost 2000 people are Continue reading >>

The Steve Bieringer

The Steve Bieringer "keep On Trucking" Award

The Steve Bieringer "Keep on Trucking" Award "Advocacy to fight diabetes-based discrimination empowers me to live my life the way I want to, not the way others would have me live it." From 2005 through 2009, Steve Bieringer led the Association's efforts to train and grow the ranks of advocates, more than doubling the number of advocates working to help end discrimination. Recognizing the need to train these advocates to handle the hardest cases and make sure today's lawsuit didn't hurt tomorrow's plaintiff, Steve developed a comprehensive training program for attorneys called Fighting for Fairness. This two-day program brought together legal and medical experts to educate lawyers from around the country on how to handle a diabetes discrimination case from start to finish. Held in 2005, 2007 and 2009, Fighting for Fairness trained more than 150 attorneys. Steve also helped launch the Association's Advanced School Advocacy Training program, which today numbers more than 150 school advocates. As a person living with type 1 diabetes, Steve understood well how diabetes can interfere with important parts of daily life such as work, school, and travel. The award is called the "Keep on Trucking" award because of Steve's desire to keep making progress on the road to fairness for people with diabetes. Steve was outraged when a person with diabetes is told "no" simply because he or she has diabetes as used to be the case for commercial drivers who use insulin. Steve brought his incredible skills as an organizer, his great mind, and his passion to ending that discrimination and fighting for access to care for all people with diabetes. First in his role as State Advocacy Director for the western U.S. to his later role on Legal Advocacy staff growing volunteer networks, developing t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Articles, Healthyfood, Recipes And Fitness Tips Diabetes Strong

Diabetes Articles, Healthyfood, Recipes And Fitness Tips Diabetes Strong

No-Carb, Low-Carb, or Moderate Carb Diet Which is Best for Diabetes? Is a no carb, low carb or moderate carb diet the best choice for someone living with diabetes? This is a question Im asked almost daily, and today I will try to answer it by sharing my experiences with all three diet types.Before I jump into the different diets, lets get the obvious answer ... Continue reading >>

Kate Cornell: Type 2 Diabetes Blogger

Kate Cornell: Type 2 Diabetes Blogger

Sharing the good and the bad Browse Kate Cornell’s site and you’ll find quirky posts about her taste-testing a low-glycemic ice cream—“you know . . . for science”—and her first few experiences at the local gym. “I may not be a gym rat, but maybe a gym white mouse,” she writes. The Arizona-based blogger also shares diabetes-friendly recipes and tips. Her favorite carb swap: zoodles (zucchini noodles). Her posts illustrate her successes and struggles with type 2 diabetes. “Stigma is an ugly bully,” she says. “If I can share a story about something I dealt with that helps somebody else, then I do it.” She gets honest about stuff like failing to meet goals and the emotional toll of insensitive comments. “I hope that people can read the blog and get ideas about how to improve life with diabetes—but mostly to see that it’s not all bad.” Beyond the medicine When Kate was diagnosed with type 2 in 2005, she wasn’t afraid; she was confused. “I felt like I’d been shoved out the door and was on my own,” she says. She scoured the Internet to connect with others. “Seeing people living their lives despite diabetes helps,” she says. “Support is essential.” Kate turns to her husband or chats with people she’s met through the diabetes online community (DOC). She reads both type 2 and type 1 blogs, such as brian-the-bsc.blogspot.com and testguessandgo.com. Early in her diagnosis, Kate participated in forums through tudiabetes.org, diabetesdaily.com, and community.diabetes.org. On her blog, Kate promotes her favorite events such as the Diabetes UnConference, where people with diabetes gather and talk about the emotional impact of the disease. ”I’ll continue to encourage people to connect,” Kate says. “Befriending people with diabete Continue reading >>

My Healthy Diabetic Meal Plan

My Healthy Diabetic Meal Plan

This healthy diabetic meal plan is a real-life example of what my daily diet typically looks like. Have you ever searched for “healthy diabetic meal plan” in Google or on some of the large diabetes website? I have, and I quickly became frustrated by articles that were too general to be useful and meal plans with boring food (or a ton of carbs). That’s why I wanted to share EXACTLY what my meal plan is like, how to cook the meals I eat, and how you can adjust my meal plan to your personal calorie needs. I want this to be a meal plan you can start following yourself tomorrow if you like! There is a link at the end of this post where you can download the meal plan as a PDF. The download also contains a table where you can see how much to make of each recipe based on your daily calorie need. Plus, it includes metric measurements for our international readers. How the plan works I prefer to eat six smaller meals throughout the day rather than the classic three big meals of breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Eating smaller meals allows me to spread out my carbs between the meals, making blood sugar control easier. I also rarely feel hungry between meals because I eat every 3-4 hours. Each meal has less than 30 grams of carbs, a good amount of protein, and some healthy fat. Because the meals are very similar in size and macronutrients, you can really eat them in the order you like. If you prefer chicken for breakfast and pancakes for dinner, I won’t hold you back (but I may give you a strange look…) If eating six daily meals doesn’t work for you because of your schedule (work, family, etc.), please don’t stress about it. You can just combine some of the meals and have four meals instead. It’s better to have a routine that works than trying to force yourself to eat s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet The Best Diet For Optimal Blood Sugar Control & Health

Diabetes Diet The Best Diet For Optimal Blood Sugar Control & Health

The Diabetes Diet is now available in paperback and e-book. The Diabetes Diet explores what people affected with type one diabetes and type two diabetes, pre-diabetes and obesity need to do to get mastery over their blood sugar control, metabolism and weight. The scientific reasoning behind the low carbohydrate dietary approach is fully referenced and made easy by menu plans and low-carb recipes. You will be introduced to information and case studies that help you decide what level of blood sugar control, carbohydrate restriction and monitoring is most appropriate for your individual needs. Children, adolescents, women needing contraception or planning a pregnancy, drivers, keep fit enthusiasts, and those with emotional problems or co-morbidities will find advice in this book for them. We also help those new to exercise fit it into their lives. In The Diabetes Diet , doctors, nurses and dieticians will learn about the dietary approach endorsed by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and the Nutrition and Metabolism Society but which is not yet taught in most NHS diabetes clinics or by the American Diabetes Association. The complexities of insulin management for optimal insulin to meal matching is covered in depth and other medications used in diabetes are discussed. Many people think that a sensible and scientifically accurate approach to blood sugar management is long overdue for diabetics including Ron Raab, ex vice president of the International Diabetes Federation, who has contributed his story about how this way of eating and low-carb recipes have helped him manage diabetes in this book. This book can help those with type 1 diabetes AND type 2 diabetes. It won’t cure diabetes, but it will make living with the condition so much easier. But don Continue reading >>

The 5 Must-reads From The Healthy Diabetic

The 5 Must-reads From The Healthy Diabetic

WRITTEN BY: Daniel Piper From the moment I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes I wanted to know as much as I could in order to help myself. Being 22, I plunged into this strange new world pretty much overnight and having very little knowledge on the condition, I thought the best way to try and make sense of everything was to take control of my health through education. I’m a big advocate of education. I believe the best person who can help you is you, and that is especially true when it comes to diabetes management. My thought process was that if I get my overall health under control, then controlling my diabetes management would, hopefully, be a little more straightforward. There are many books out there that are aimed directly for diabetics. Many you can pick up online or in your local book store that will give you a real insight into this crazy and, at times, unpredictable world. But after four years of being a Type 1 diabetic, I’ve found a mixture of diabetes specific and overall health-management books that have helped me the most. Once read, I’ve then used these to tie into my own every-day and long-term health and applied, where necessary, to my diabetes management. Today, I want to share the top 5 books that I’ve come across that have helped me the most in understanding and living with diabetes over the last four years — both from a mental and physical standpoint. 5 – by Rosemary Walkers & Jill Rodgers The week I got diagnosed my parents bought me this and it’s still on my desk right next to me as I write this. It’s my go-to guide on all things diabetes related. It covers a huge variety of topics from the basics, to the gender specifics, to nutrition, to exercise and onto potential complications. It’s a fantastic go-to book. 4 – The Chimp Para Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 1 Diabetes By: Valeria Guerrero What’s it like? It’s pricking your finger endlessly throughout the day. It’s not being afraid of blood because you get used to seeing so much of it. It’s no longer feeling tremor to a needle because you’ve had no choice than to be poked by them every day. It’s being woken up countless times throughout the night to fix blood sugars that just won’t become stable. It’s waking up feeling hung over because your sugars were high all night no matter the amount of corrections you gave yourself. It’s not being able to eat whatever you want before carb counting and analyzing how it will affect your sugars later. It’s having to put on a fake smile every time you have to explain to someone that type 1 and type 2 diabetes are NOT the same thing. It’s not being able to go a single work out without stressing if you’re going to go too low, drop too fast or go high. It’s seeing all the scars all over our tummy, arms and legs from all the site changes and pokes and just cry. It’s people staring at you while you poke yourself and watching you like something is wrong with you. It’s people telling you “you can’ t have that” or “should you be eating that?” It’s people assuming you have type 2 when you say you have diabetes. It’s watching people look at you like you’re breaking the law by having a candy. It’s asking yourself what you did wrong because you got this disease even when they say it isn’t your fault. It’s remembering what it was like before being diagnosed and feeling nostalgic. It’s struggling with money and possibly going into debt because supplies are just so expensive. It’s wanting to cry whenever you hear a representative say “your insurance doesn’t co Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

When thinking of diabetes what is the first thing that comes to your mind? Insulin? Injections? Of course, these things are very important – for type 1 diabetics. However, almost 90% of all diabetics have type 2 and mostly don’t need to inject insulin. But nevertheless, having type 2 diabetes can change your life completely and you need to take good care of your health. In the UK there are more than 135 and in the US more than 1400 diabetes-related amputations – every week. But the good news is: it doesn’t need to get that far. With the right treatment and responsible behavior, you can do a lot to prevent the progress of your diabetes. And you’re not alone: There are a lot of bloggers providing insight into their lives with type 2 diabetes, sharing their experience and motivation. How do I keep my blood glucose levels stable? What is the right diet for me? And is there an app that supports me with my diabetes? We’ve collected 20 of the most inspiring blogs about type 2 diabetes that you need to read: Are you missing one of your favorite blogs? Please write us in the comment section below. Diabetes Ramblings Sue writes about her personal experiences with type 2 diabetes and how she is dealing with her life as a mom of five. She says about herself: “I may have type 2 diabetes but it doesn't have me!” diabetesramblings.com Diabetes Stops Here On this blog, run by the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes share their stories about “what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs”. diabetesstopshere.org Bob’s Blog, UK Bob writes about how he is living well with type 2 diabetes and how he is managing his condition with the right diet, exercise, and oral medication. fractis.net D Continue reading >>

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