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Health Insurance For Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes | Cigna

Type 1 Diabetes | Cigna

This topic covers type 1 diabetes, including information about symptoms, tests, and home treatment. For specific information about children who have type 1 diabetes, see the topic Type 1 Diabetes: Children Living With the Disease . Type 1 diabetes happens when your pancreas stops making insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body's cells use sugar (glucose) for energy. It also helps the body store extra energy in muscle, fat, and liver cells. Without insulin, this sugar can't get into your cells to do its work. It stays in your blood instead. And then your blood sugar level gets too high. High blood sugar can harm many parts of the body , such as the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nerves, and kidneys. It can also increase your risk for other health problems (complications). Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but it usually starts in children or young adults. That's why it used to be called juvenile diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is different from type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body stops making insulin. In type 2, the body can't use insulin the right way. Over time with type 2, the body doesn't make enough insulin. There isn't a cure for type 1 diabetes. But with treatment, people can live long and healthy lives. The body makes insulin in beta cells, which are in a part of the pancreas called the islet (say "EYE-let") tissue. Type 1 diabetes starts because the body destroys those beta cells. Experts don't know why this happens. Some people have a greater chance of getting type 1 diabetes because they have a parent, brother, or sister who has it. But most people with the illness don't have a family history. Other things that increase the risk of getting type 1 diabetes are being white and having islet cell antibodies in the blood. What are the symptoms of und Continue reading >>

Health Insurance For Diabetics

Health Insurance For Diabetics

Health insurance pays for private treatment Private medical insurance is available to people with diabetes to give you the peace of mind of being able to access medical treatment privately and at the earliest opportunity. There is no need to worry about waiting lists or sharing a ward with eight strangers, you can get immediate treatment at the best hospitals the UK has to offer. Most providers or brokers will advise you that if you are already diabetic you will not now or ever be able to get private insurance covering this condition or anything that can be related to it, this however is not the case. We work with a specialist medical insurance broker called Healthnet Services, who have access to a policy that can cover you for potential future conditions relating to diabetes like heart conditions, strokes or eye issues. Medical insurance will not only cover you for future issues relating to the diabetes but also for the more run of the mill conditions that may crop up such as joint replacements, hernias, knee arthroscopys or hysterectomies etc. A lot of people are concerned regarding the cancer cover the NHS currently offers and more specifically the availability of the super drugs that can cost over 50,000 per course. Currently it is a post code lottery as to whether you receive them or not, you may not have access to them but a friend who lives 5 minutes away will. These drugs are available privately for as long as a specialist recommends them again giving you have the peace of mind to know you will have access to all available treatments and drugs no matter for what time period or how much they cost. Is my diabetes covered by health insurance? Healthnet Services can provide quotations over the phone in a matter of minutes, all they would require is to confirm some Continue reading >>

Health Insurance And Diabetes: What Your Insurer Wont Tell You

Health Insurance And Diabetes: What Your Insurer Wont Tell You

What Your Health Insurance Company Won't Tell You Written by Mike Hoskins on October 19, 2017 Dealing with insurance coverage is of course one of the biggest headaches of living with a chronic illness like diabetes. These days, it's even more nerve-wracking with all the political back-and-forth about healthcare policy , leaving folks with "pre-existing conditions" unsure how our coverage will be affected. With the nationwide open enrollment period about to begin for many employer-based insurance policies, and the unfortunately shorter 'Obamacare' enrollment period only lasting until Dec. 15, this is a key time for many of us to make insurance decisions. And it's no picnic trying to review options, we know. To offer some assistance, we compiled the following list of tips on how to get satisfaction from your insurance company -- things they often don't tell you but are important to know when dealing with them. This list was originally published a few years ago following the second annual MasterLab advocacy training event featuring some key D-advocates with insider knowledge of "payers" (a telling name for health insurance companies). Here's the 2017 update on what may help if you're a PWD navigating coverage issues: Tips for Swaying Your Health Insurance Company Search online. Sounds like a no-brainer, but you can often find insurance companies' medical policies online for a specific drug, device, or therapy just by Googling it. Look for language outlining the criteria they use to determine whether or not youre eligible and covered. As a non-doctor, of course you won't have access to the physicians only portal on your payer's website, so using Google, just type in your payer's name (Aetna, BCBS Virginia, etc.), the name of the treatment category (subcutaneous insulin inf Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes. The Aca Is A Bfd For Me.

I Have Diabetes. The Aca Is A Bfd For Me.

Home | Blog | 2017 | 06 | 29 | I have diabetes. The ACA is a BFD for me. I have diabetes. The ACA is a BFD for me. GOP 'replacement' legislation would dismantle nearly every gain that ACA delivered to the diabetes community, and to the sick in general On March 23, 2010, the day the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law, three words were whispered to President Barack Obama, but caught on mic: big f****** deal. Its now one of the most memorable lines from that historic day, not because it was seemingly a gaff from Vice President Biden but because it was, in fact, a sincere expression of just how monumental passage of the ACA was for millions of Americans. It meant that for the first time in American history, the uninsured and the underinsured would gain access to care they wanted and needed. As someone with diabetes, I can attest that the ACA is truly a BFD. The law has been a godsend to me, financially, health-wise, and, well, spiritually. Confidently, I assert that the other 29 million Americans suffering with diabetes as well as the tens of millions more with other chronic illnesses would echo that sentiment. Without access to quality coverage options and consumer protections the ACA makes available today, I would be either dead, financially ruined, or at best stuck in a corporate job just to be able to hold on to employer-sponsored health coverage. The author with his grandmother, who told him, You can never go without health insurance. Period. At age 10, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. However, I had been no doubt living with the disease untreated for a good amount of time by that point. Persistent stomach aches, constant need to urinate, unquenchable thirst, abnormal irritation, and severe weight loss became signals to my parent Continue reading >>

Skip The Coverage Gap: Maintaining Diabetes Care While Changing Insurance

Skip The Coverage Gap: Maintaining Diabetes Care While Changing Insurance

Skip the Coverage Gap: Maintaining Diabetes Care While Changing Insurance How to navigate changes in insurance with diabetes without losing access to care, whether getting a new job, turning 26, or moving to a new state Changing health insurance plans can be daunting with diabetes. Tracking down various prescriptions, organizing paperwork, making phone calls to providers and device suppliers, and updating information at pharmacies is a headache for anyone. Whether youre changing jobs, moving to a new state, switching to Medicare, or turning 26, there are ways to avoid losing your health insurance at any point during the transition. The sections below aim to guide you through the process of preparing to switch insurance, no matter what type of transition youre going through. In this article (Click to jump to a particular section): If you are changing jobs, start planning at least four weeks before you give your notice so that you are prepared to ask your current employer for the information you need. If you are switching insurance because you are turning 26, start planning several months in advance. 2. You will need to devote some time to gather documentation, research and select new plans, and make phone calls. Depending on your specific situation, you may need to spend anywhere from five to twenty or more hours on this process. 3. Gather the following information and keep it in an accessible place: Social Security Numbers for you and family members Employer and income information (such as paystubs or W-2 forms) Health insurance card for your current health insurance plan, which includes the policy numbers Notices from your current plan that include your plan ID Contact information (email address and phone number) for the individual in your employers Human Resources (H Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Supplemental Health Policy Covers The Gaps | Trusted Choice

A Diabetes Supplemental Health Policy Covers The Gaps | Trusted Choice

Get Insurance for Diabetics That Meets Your Needs Diabetes is one of the most commonly occurring diseases in the United States. While treatable, this disease makes it costly to maintain a normal life. Finding the proper health insurance is vital to someone with diabetes, but it can be difficult to get all of your needs met in your primary care plan. It is estimated that healthcare costs for diabetics are over twice the cost of someone without diabetes, due to the costs of daily maintenance, medications and regular doctors visits. If you have diabetes, you may need a supplemental plan to help manage your care. A local independent agent in the Trusted Choice network who specializes in health insurance can be an excellent resource for you. These agents have partnerships with multiple insurance companies and can often find specialty policies and supplemental plans that can help bridge healthcare gaps. Contact a local member agent today to inquire about supplemental insurance for diabetics that matches your needs. Close to 26 million people in the U.S. have diabetes There are 3 different types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, and gestational diabetes The cost of diabetes is over $170 billion per year By 2025, the number of people diagnosed with diabetes is expected to double Supplemental Health Insurance for People with Diabetes People searching for additional diabetic insurance coverage do have options, but you may need to do a bit of research to find them. Depending on where you live and work, some of your supplemental healthcare options may include: Employer coverage: If you receive health insurance from your employer, this may be your best choice for receiving diabetes insurance, at least until the Affordable Care Act is fully in effect. Group plans cannot deny coverage bas Continue reading >>

The High Cost Of Insurance Gaps If You Have Diabetes

The High Cost Of Insurance Gaps If You Have Diabetes

The High Cost of Insurance Gaps If You Have Diabetes Written by Ginger Vieira on July 17, 2018 Researchers say 1 in 4 people with type 1 diabetes go at least 30 days without health coverage. That gap can be damaging financially and physically. Living well with type 1 diabetes requires a great deal more than a healthy diet and some regular exercise. Type 1 diabetes is an unpreventable autoimmune type of diabetes that causes a person to no longer produce insulin, the hormone all mammals need in order to stay alive. A person with the disease must have quarterly doctor appointments that come with a variety of blood tests to assess whether their medications need to be adjusted and if their overall blood levels are in the safest possible range. They also need a large amount of life-saving insulin and medical technology. Paying for that technology and treatment out of pocket would be nearly impossible for them. A study published in the July issue of Health Affairs from the University of Michigan discovered that 1 out of every 4 adults with type 1 diabetes have experienced a minimum of 30 days during which they had no health insurance coverage. More importantly, the average length of time those people went without insurance coverage was three years. With the cost of insulin and test strips alone costing nearly $1,000 for one months supply, going 30 days without insurance can be devastating financially to people with diabetes, as well as to their overall well-being. The study reports that people with type 1 diabetes with a gap of insurance coverage for more than 30 days are five times more likely to visit the emergency room or urgent care center. If they live in poverty or a low-income household, they can easily find themselves choosing between paying their rent over buying mor Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Health Insurance For Diabetes?

Health Insurance For Diabetes?

Most people with diabetes need health insurance, but having diabetes creates insurance problems. How can you get insurance that works for you? Why people with diabetes need health insurance According to a study in the journal Diabetes Care, People with diagnosed diabetes, on average, have medical expenditures approximately 2.3 times higher than they would have without diabetes. In 2012, these expenses averaged $13,700 dollars per person per year. Major costs include: Medications. The newer and more high-tech your prescription drugs, the more they will cost. Sulfonylureas and metformin are almost free, while GLP-1 agonists, DPP-4 inhibitors, and SGLT-2 inhibitors would be out of most peoples price range without insurance. Medical visits. Besides seeing your general practitioner and maybe an endocrinologist, you are supposed to see an eye doctor once a year, a podiatrist, and if complications threaten, maybe a cardiologist and a nephrologist. Specialists cost a lot. You might also see a diabetes educator, dietitian, or counselor. Diabetes equipment : Meters, test strips, lancets, and possibly a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), to start with. Syringes or a pump if you use insulin. Glucose tabs. Special shoes or inserts. And so on. Care of complications can cost a lot, and are mostly not counted in the cost of diabetes care figures quoted above. Unless youre rich, you will need some kind of medical insurance to cover diabetes care costs. Unfortunately, insurance may be difficult to get. Not long ago, people with diabetes could be excluded from health insurance because of a pre-existing condition. The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) made that discrimination illegal, but that doesnt make it easy to find insurance. According to CNBC, most Americans are covered through their Continue reading >>

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

Financial Help For Diabetes Care

How costly is diabetes management and treatment? Diabetes management and treatment is expensive. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the average cost of health care for a person with diabetes is $13,741 a year—more than twice the cost of health care for a person without diabetes.1 Many people who have diabetes need help paying for their care. For those who qualify, a variety of government and nongovernment programs can help cover health care expenses. This publication is meant to help people with diabetes and their family members find and access such resources. 1American Diabetes Association. Economic costs of diabetes in the U.S. in 2012. Diabetes Care. 2013;36(4):1033–1046. What is health insurance? Health insurance helps pay for medical care, including the cost of diabetes care. Health insurance options include the following: private health insurance, which includes group and individual health insurance government health insurance, such as Medicare, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE, and veterans’ health care programs Starting in 2014, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prevents insurers from denying coverage or charging higher premiums to people with preexisting conditions, such as diabetes. The ACA also requires most people to have health insurance or pay a fee. Some people may be exempt from this fee. Read more about the ACA at HealthCare.gov or call 1–800–318–2596, TTY 1–855–889–4325. Key Terms Some terms listed here have many meanings; only those meanings that relate to the financial and medical aspects of diabetes and its management and treatment are included. affiliation period: a period of time that must pass before health insurance coverage provided by a health maintenance organization (HMO) be Continue reading >>

Insurance 'churn' Poses Serious Risks For Diabetes Patients - Futurity

Insurance 'churn' Poses Serious Risks For Diabetes Patients - Futurity

One in four working-age adults with type 1 diabetes had at least one gap of at least 30 days in their private health insurance, within an average of a three-year period, according to a new study. For a million American adults, living with type 1 diabetes means a constant need for insulin medication, blood sugar testing supplies, and specialized care, to keep them healthy and prevent a crisis that could end up in an emergency room, a hospital bed, or death. Type 1 diabetes requires intensive daily management, in order to simply remain alive A temporary loss of coverage had a sizable impact on the patients use of health care once they got insurance again. After a gap of 30 days or more, adults with type 1 diabetes were five times more likely to end up in an emergency room, hospital, or urgent care center than in the period before the interruption. Insurance gaps also increased patients rolling-average blood sugar levels, or HbA1c, measurements, indicating a lower level of control during the gap. Higher levels can increase the risk of long-term diabetes complications. Questionnaires showed those who had an insurance gap reported less satisfaction with their lives and worse health status. Overall, one-fourth of working age adults with type 1 diabetes in the United States indicated that their health was fair or poor. The new study is the first to look at the impacts of health insurance churna term for moving in and out of different health insurance planson people with type 1 diabetes using data from private insurance companies. Type 1 diabetes requires intensive daily management, in order to simply remain alive, so interruptions to care and coverage of insulin and supplies can pose a major risk, says Mary A. M. Rogers, a researcher at the University of Michigan Medical Scho Continue reading >>

More Adults With Diabetes Had Health Insurance After Aca Implementation

More Adults With Diabetes Had Health Insurance After Aca Implementation

More adults with diabetes had health insurance after ACA implementation Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. Receive an email when new articles are posted on this topic. After implementation of the Affordable Care Act, more adults with diabetes reported having insurance coverage and spending less on medical costs compared with before the implementation, study data show. Sarah S. Casagrande, PhD, senior research analyst at Social and Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, Maryland, and colleagues evaluated data from the 2009 to 2016 National Health Interview Surveys on 6,220 adults with diabetes to assess national changes in health insurance coverage and related costs before and after implementation of the ACA in 2010. Participants used the surveys to report on health insurance coverage, demographic information, diabetes-related factors and amount spent on medical expenses and insurance premiums. The prevalence of adults aged 18 to 64 years with health insurance coverage increased from 84.7% in 2009 to 90.1% in 2016 (P < .001). Among participants aged 18 to 64 years, health insurance coverage increased in those aged 50 to 59 years and men (P < .02 for both), in white, black and Hispanic adults vs. Asians and other ethnic groups (P < .05 for all), in those with less than or more than a high school education compared with high school level (P < .03 for both), in those with an income less than $35,000 (P < .001), in those who were married or living with a partner vs. those who were divorced or separated, widowed or never married (P = .05), and in those with diabetes duration less than 5 years or more than 15 years (P < .04 for both). Coverage also increased nonsignificantly in those taking medications, and increase Continue reading >>

The Ultimate Health Insurance Guide For Individuals With Diabetes

The Ultimate Health Insurance Guide For Individuals With Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease that requires a lot of self-management along with the help of various medical equipment and medication such as blood glucose monitor, test strips , insulin, and syringes. Without any health insurance coverage, it will almost be impossible to receive sufficient treatment to manage the symptoms and prevent complications from arising. Although individuals with pre-existing conditions have difficulties getting health insurance coverage in the past, the recent health care reform has significantly made the process much easier for diabetes patients to obtain a policy and receive proper health care. If you have recently been diagnosed with diabetes and/or need to subscribe to a new health insurance policy, this article will give you a wide series of information that will be of help: Health Insurance 101: What is Health Insurance? Health insurance is a form of insurance that provides coverage for an individual who requires medical treatment and/or management. Depending on what type of policy the individual has chosen, the insurance company will either make direct payment to the health provider or reimburse the individual after the payment. When you are reading about health insurance information , you will come across two commonly used terms: provider and insured. The term health provider includes any facilities or professionals that provide health care to the individuals; in other words, health provider can be a hospital, a clinic, an emergency clinic, a doctor, a laboratory facility, a pharmacy, and any health care practitioners. The term insured is the subscriber of the health insurance policy that means you. Coinsurance: It is the percentage of costs you are required to pay for your covered services after you have paid your deductible. Copayment: It is Continue reading >>

Health Insurance And Diabetes: An Expert Guide

Health Insurance And Diabetes: An Expert Guide

Health Insurance and Diabetes: An Expert Guide Navigating the complex world of health insurance can seem overwhelming. Here's advice to help you sort through it to get the most diabetes coverage for your insurance dollar. Written by Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE Navigating health insurance when you live with diabetes can be a nightmare. Here's some advice from an expert.Navigating the health insurance world with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes takes some skill, but it's definitely doable. Having diabetes means that your health insurance needs will change. It's important to have a medical insurance plan that covers the needs of your conditioninsulin (if you need it) and other diabetes supplies and medications. Make sure you fully understand your health insurance plan and the options available to you. If something doesn't seem right or if you have questions, call your health insurance provider. You can also go to your health insurance provider's website, which typically provides answers to frequently asked questions. #1. Know these terms since they will be used to discuss cost of diabetes supplies and medicines: Coinsurance: the % of costs you are required to pay after you have met your deductible. Copayment: referred to as copaysa fixed fee you pay for each covered health care service after you have paid your deductible. Deductible: the amount have to pay for your covered services before your insurance provider begins to pay for the rest of your expenses. Durable Medical Equipment (DME): Any equipment and supplies that are ordered by your health care provider as an everyday necessity use. This includes blood glucose monitors and test strips, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors and CPAP machines. Out-Of-Pocket Maximum: the amount of annual expenses Continue reading >>

Health Insurance Coverage Among People With And Without Diabetes In The U.s. Adult Population

Health Insurance Coverage Among People With And Without Diabetes In The U.s. Adult Population

OBJECTIVE To compare health insurance coverage and type of coverage for adults with and without diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The data used were from 2,704 adults who self-reported diabetes and 25,008 adults without reported diabetes in the 2009 National Health Interview Survey. Participants reported on their current type of health insurance coverage, demographic information, diabetes-related factors, and comorbidities. If uninsured, participants reported reasons for not having health insurance. RESULTS Among all adults with diabetes, 90% had some form of health insurance coverage, including 85% of people 18–64 years of age and ∼100% of people ≥65 years of age; 81% of people without diabetes had some type of coverage (vs. diabetes, P < 0.0001), including 78% of people 18–64 years of age and 99% of people ≥65 years of age. More adults 18–64 years of age with diabetes had Medicare coverage (14% vs. no diabetes, 3%; P < 0.0001); fewer people with diabetes had private insurance (58% vs. no diabetes, 66%; P < 0.0001). People 18–64 years of age with diabetes more often had two health insurance sources compared with people without diabetes (13 vs. 5%, P < 0.0001). The most common private plan was a preferred provider organization (PPO) followed by a health maintenance organization/independent practice organization (HMO/IPA) plan regardless of diabetes status. For participants 18–64 years of age, high health insurance cost was the most common reason for not having coverage. CONCLUSIONS Two million adults <65 years of age with diabetes had no health insurance coverage, which has considerable public health and economic impact. Health care reform should work toward ensuring that people with diabetes have coverage for routine care. The number of adults in th Continue reading >>

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