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Health Anxiety Over Diabetes

Anxiety And Diabetes: Innovative Approaches To Management In Primary Care

Anxiety And Diabetes: Innovative Approaches To Management In Primary Care

Go to: Abstract Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chief concern for patients, healthcare providers, and health care systems in America, and around the globe. Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus exhibit clinical and subclinical symptoms of anxiety more frequently than people without diabetes. Anxiety is traditionally associated with poor metabolic outcomes and increased medical complications among those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Collaborative care models have been utilized in the multidisciplinary treatment of mental health problems and chronic disease, and have demonstrated success in managing the pathology of depression which often accompanies diabetes. However, no specific treatment model has been published that links the treatment of anxiety to the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Given the success of collaborative care models in treating depression associated with diabetes, and anxiety unrelated to chronic disease, it is possible that the collaborative care treatment of primary care patients who suffer from both anxiety and diabetes could be met with the same success. The key issue is determining how to implement and sustain these models in practice. This review summarizes the proposed link between anxiety and diabetes, and offers an innovative and evidence-based collaborative care model for anxiety and diabetes in primary care. Keywords: Diabetes, anxiety, primary care, comorbidity, collaborative care Go to: Introduction Disparities Type 2 diabetes mellitus Diabetes mellitus affects approximately 29.18 million persons in the United States, which accounts for 9.3% of the American population.1 Individuals with diabetes have difficulty producing insulin and/or effectively utilizing the insulin that the body generates. As a result, glucose accumulates in t Continue reading >>

Am I A Diabetic Or Just A Severe Hypochondriac? : Diabetes

Am I A Diabetic Or Just A Severe Hypochondriac? : Diabetes

Hey guys,For starters: I'm a HUGE hypochondriac and also have struggled with severe depression and anxiety since I was a child(I'm 22 now), so I'd appreciate if you guys were patient with me as I know I probably sound crazy. For starters I have tested my sugars over several periods, the most recent being in April when I had my last freakout about diabetes. Pretty much all of my fastings were in the mid 90s, although I did get a 105 once. I tested myself with a few foods: I ate a cheeseburger and got 116 at 1 hour, 118 at 2 hour and 112 by the third before going back to the 90s and 80s. I had two pieces of Sees candy and got 123 at 1 hour and 115 at 2 hours, 115 at 2 hours after movie theater popcorn, etc. What really freaked me out though is when I once got a reading of 300. I had been in a state of severe depression and ate literally nothing at all for over a week, as I was too upset to eat. So I decided to test myself and have two hot dogs with ketchup and a glass of milk. I tested literally RIGHT after I finished eating and was terrified when I got 300. I am pretty certain the reading was accurate as I was extremely thirsty and having to pee nonstop at that point which are symptoms of high blood sugar. However at the 1 hour reading it was back at 95 and kept going down. I was so confused and wondered if it had anything to do with the fact that I hadnt eaten anything in nearly 2 weeks and then inhaled a carby meal. Sorry for this huge rant but thought you needed some background. I also have several symptoms such as frequent urination, floaters in eyes, and dry and itchy skin(although only on one hand which is confusing). Anyway so in April I went to the doctor and got some bloodwork done, my fasting came back at 96 and my doctor told me not to worry about it. Unfortu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Associated With Anxiety Symptoms

Diabetes Is Associated With Anxiety Symptoms

Research shows that moderate-to-severe anxiety symptoms, an indication of a potential anxiety disorder, affect one in five people with insulin-treated type 2 diabetes and one in six with type 1 diabetes or non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes. Dr Adriana Ventura, Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Behavioural Research in Diabetes (ACBRD) and registered psychologist, who conducted the study, says the prevalence of elevated anxiety symptoms and disorders in people with diabetes is within the range of general population estimates. However, having anxiety and diabetes poses additional challenges. “Living with diabetes can be difficult enough, managing healthy living, medications and monitoring, and fitting these into daily life. Experiencing anxiety as well adds to the burden, and can impact on both their medical outcomes and quality of life,” said Dr Ventura. Detecting anxiety among people with diabetes can be difficult, as some of the symptoms share similar physical symptoms to hypoglycaemia (high blood glucose levels). The relationship between diabetes and anxiety disorders needs to be further explored. For some people, diabetes may be completely unrelated to their anxiety – they just coexist – while for others, it may be that living with diabetes leads to feelings of anxiety. In response to the research, a resource from the National Diabetes Services Scheme (NDSS) highlights the impact of anxiety on diabetes management, and how to identify elevated anxiety symptoms. The resource, which was developed by the ACBRD in collaboration with Diabetes Australia, is titled: Diabetes and emotional health: A handbook for health professionals supporting adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Dr Christel Hendrieckx, Senior Research Fellow and a clinical psychologist Continue reading >>

Might Have Diabetes - Health Anxiety - Anxiety Central Forums & Chat Room

Might Have Diabetes - Health Anxiety - Anxiety Central Forums & Chat Room

So today when I was with my counselor and we were talking about the way I eat and how sometimes I get panic attacks and wake up from them and other times I get them right when I wake up in the morning. My counselor told me that she doesn't think I'm eating enough or getting enough nutrients and she think I might have low blood sugar. So she recommended to my parents a place to get my blood taken to be tested for hypoglycemia. I have thought that I've had this before because anxiety is a symptom of it and when I don't eat for a couple of hours I get shaky and irritated and I feel like I'm going to pass out and then as soon as I eat something with sugar in it I start to feel better. I have fainted twice before because of that and when I told my counselor that she told me she really wants me to get tested. I'm not sure when I'm going to yet but I'm really nervous about getting my blood taken. I have gotten it taken before but that was about 7 years ago. I'm so scared I'm going to get dizzy or something because for some of the tests I have to fast and I get dizzy enough when I don't eat. I'm also nervous about this coming back positive, I know that will mean I'll have to make a big change in my eating habits and that's going to be really hard because I'm a really picky eater. Also I don't like to try new foods because I'm always scared im going to be allergic to them and then I have a panic attack. I'm just so nervous about all of this, any advice on how to alleviate my nervousness? Hi brit, I thought diabetes causes high blood sugar not low? Having said that I do get confused about it. My Mum, Brother and Mother In Law all have diabetes, albeit different types. It is a good idea to be tested and I'm surprised your doctor didn't already. First thing mine did was test my th Continue reading >>

Is Anxiety Increasing Your Diabetes Risk?

Is Anxiety Increasing Your Diabetes Risk?

Is Anxiety Increasing Your Diabetes Risk? Anxiety disorders and general anxiety around life changes, financial trouble, family problems, and relationships are rife today. It is something you might even take as par for the course with 21st-century living. But if someone told you that your anxiety issues may also spill over into your physical and metabolic health, causing diabetes, would that change things? With some researchers uncovering links between anxiety issues and diabetes, it may be time to take charge and find a way to nip your anxiety problem in the bud. Having a metabolic disorder or problem like diabetes can make a person understandably concerned, even anxious. But what if your anxiety itself could lead to diabetes, or worsen your condition if youre already diabetic? Some studies find that this might, in fact, be the case. According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, a sizable 40 percent of all people with diabetes have some anxiety symptoms, while 14 percent have actually been diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder.1 While it is widely accepted that poor blood sugar control in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes causes anxiety, there is now evidence that anxiety itself could bring on diabetes in some people. Unholy Trinity: Stress, Anxiety, And Diabetes For years, even centuries now, theories on how diabetes is more common among those with more stressful or sorrowful lives have done the rounds. Dr. W. Menninger, an American psychiatrist, went so far as to suggest there was a typical diabetic personality. As one review of multiple studies found, chronic emotional stress is a well-known risk factor in the occurrence of depression. Later studies have also established a link between type 2 diabetes and depression. The sequence of stress triggering an Continue reading >>

Anxiety

Anxiety

It’s normal to feel anxious or worried at times. Everyone does. In fact, a moderate amount of anxiety can be good. It helps you respond appropriately to real danger, and it can help motivate you to excel at work and at home. But if you often feel anxious without reason and your worries disrupt your daily life, you may have an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders cause excessive or unrealistic anxiety and worry about life circumstances, usually without a readily identifiable cause. Little is known about the relationship between diabetes and anxiety. Recent evidence suggests that the rate of anxiety disorders is elevated in people with type 1 diabetes. It is estimated that 14% of people with diabetes have generalized anxiety disorder. As many as 40% of people have at least some anxiety symptoms, and fear of hypoglycemia is not uncommon in those with diabetes. Anxiety disorders in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes may be associated with poor blood sugar control. Signs & symptoms of anxiety The signs and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder can vary in combination or severity. They may include: Restlessness Feeling of being tense or on edge Feeling a lump in your throat Difficulty concentrating Fatigue Irritability Impatience Being easily distracted Muscle tension Trouble falling or staying asleep (insomnia) Excessive sweating Shortness of breath Stomach ache Diarrhea Headache Treatment of anxiety The two main treatments for anxiety disorders are medication (anti-anxiety drugs and/or anti-depressants) and psychotherapy ("talk therapy"), either alone or in combination. If you have difficulty controlling your worries, or if anxiety interferes with your daily life, speak with your doctor, diabetes health-care team or mental health professional. Continue reading >>

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

Dealing with diabetes puts a lot of attention on blood glucose monitoring and insulin and medications—and those are important, of course. But there is an emotional side to diabetes and effects on your mental health that should be addressed, too. Diabetes interrupts your workday when you have to check your blood glucose. Diabetes means you can't just grab food whenever you want—you have to plan for it. Diabetes prolongs getting ready in the morning as you wash and inspect your feet. Diabetes frustrates you when your taste buds cry out for a pastry instead of an apple. Diabetes makes you worry about your future. All of the time, effort, money, and stress interrupts your emotional stability and introduces emotional complications—and it's okay to be frustrated or overwhelmed or scared. Diabetes and "Being in Control" Let's face it: most of us like being in control, and we don't like feeling that anything is out of our control. When it comes to diabetes, you can feel simultaneously in control and out of control. Out of control: Because of how diabetes affects your body, it is possible to feel that nothing is in your control anymore. You can't eat what you want when you want. You have to take medications or give yourself injections. You can start, perhaps, to feel that your body isn't your own anymore. How to counteract that "out of control" feeling: Taking a step back and an objective look at the situation may help. You can say to yourself, "Yes, diabetes makes me do these things, but diabetes does not run my life." A mantra along those lines—repeated at moments when you're feeling particularly out of control—can help. Also, you can do a mental mind shift: all these steps you're taking to manage your diabetes are actually proactive, healthy steps. You are taking co Continue reading >>

Worried About Diabetes?

Worried About Diabetes?

I've been concerned about this and like many anxiety sufferers, wanna get this checked but my mom keeps saying I'm worried for nothing. I notice I feel crappy after eating sugar which makes me worried about diabetes. When I say crappy, I mean just gross and yuck. I don't have any symptoms of diabetes though. And no one has it in my family. (This includes cousins and grandparents and parents and siblings.) I've heard sugar and anxiety are a terrible mix, but can it really do this? I also have hot skin. But it seems to go away if I take a shower. I have been through anxiety sometime back and I have fully recovered from it. It's all in the mind. All you have to do is keep believing. If you are not a believer, then you have to start believing. The Lord Jesus suffered and died for us so that we may be blessed with great health! Start believing and God will work wonders to it! Have faith and never ever let it go. This is His promise and He stands by His words because He is Holy. Dude, your words are an answer to my prayers. Seriously. Thank you. I believe He's totally spoken to me through you. I know I will overcome this. I have never doubted. Thank you so much Obviously the lord chose who he gave great health to. Which in my family was not very many. My sister died three days ago in great pain riddled with cancer. My father the same. My 16 year old niece the same. My daughter has crohns. My grand daughter has chronic asthma. One of my sisters has angina the other two painful arthritis . Brother has heart disease and myself. Panic/anxiety for over 35yrs . I am a good person who does lots of voluntary work to enhance the lives of others. I also raise money for cancer charities so the millions of people who the lord has failed to bless with great health will hopefully find rel Continue reading >>

Worried Non Diabetic

Worried Non Diabetic

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community jingyd36 Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member I posted here last year and earlier this year about my concerns about diabetes after my GP caused me a lot of anxiety. I hope it's ok I return here to ask some advice please. I am 38, female, 5ft tall and I weigh about 8.5 stone. I started treatment for an underactive thyroid last May and I also was diagnosed with CFS earlier this year after 18 months of chronic fatigue issues. All of this has led to severe anxiety issues and agoraphobia and more recently a real phobia of tests and health issues which my new Gp has said was brought on from my old GP making me do constant tests that weren't necessary. My ex GP (he moved to a new surgery) had me repeating tests every 2 months or so, he used to ring me every few weeks suggesting I was possibly diabetic, worrying about my sodium levels as they were low on one test but since fine, worrying me I could have cancer due to my lymphocytes being a tiny bit raised and telling me the hospital wanted me to do more tests. It all broke me and I had a nervous breakdown. My new GP took over and she met my husband as I was just too anxious to deal with a handover appointment. She told my husband it was no wonder I was so anxious and traumatised because the hospital said I didn't require further tests as my lymphocyttes were only 0.7 over range. She also told him my HBA1C has been perfect for 2 years and she had no reason to be concerned. She even said to do a urine test to reassure me, which I Continue reading >>

Worried About Developing Type 1 Diabetes - No More Panic

Worried About Developing Type 1 Diabetes - No More Panic

Health anxiety is kicking me left right and centre tonight and a thought crossed my mind that I can't shake. A sibling of mine was nearly killed by undiagnosed type 1 diabetes when she was very young, early teens, it led to a blood clot that nearly blinded her in an eye and was also kinda in her brain. This was years ago mind, but I was looking it up and many health websites say that if you have a sibling with it you have a 1 in 10 chance of developing it before the age of 50. My mum is also suspected to have a pre-diabetic condition (type 2), her brother has type 2 and has kidney failure problems and is on dialysis (anything kidney related freaks me out, turns out I only have one, they speculate the other either failed of something or it just stopped working, the other grew huge to compensate.) I know it wouldn't be the end of the world if it happened, but obviously don't want it to. I'm kind of depressed over it to be honest, think I might ask a pharmacist tomorrow to test me but to my knowledge they only test for type 2. I've been so thirsty so don't know what to do really and drinking a lot of water, doesn't seem to help it. I recently had a blood test a few weeks back to test for arthritis, would it show up in that? Would an optician spot it do you think? Bleeeh I'm all worked up over this :( Re: Worried about developing type 1 diabetes What happened with your sister sounds really scary, and it's normal to feel worried about developing diabetes since there is an elevated chance. My brother has type 1 diabetes. He was diagnosed at age 11, luckily before any real complications. If you've been tested for diabetes before and your doctors are aware of your family history and your concerns, it's best to trust them. But, if you've not been tested or haven't had a check u Continue reading >>

Managing Hypo Anxiety

Managing Hypo Anxiety

Dr Jen Nash, Clinical Psychologist Lots of people withType 1 diabetesare nervous about hypos and will do what they can to avoid them. But, running your blood sugar levels higher for a long period of time, in order to avoid hypos, can increase your risk of developingcomplicationsin the future. We've spoken to Dr Jen Nash who's got some great advice to help overcome anxiety aroundhypos. Jen says... If you worry about hypos then please be reassured - you’re completely normal! Worrying about hypos is very common – one study found that 25 per cent of people with diabetes reported that worrying about hypos is a serious problem for them (Polonsky, 1999). Why are people nervous about hypos? So why do many of us worry about hypos, particularly when, in most cases, they can be treated with relative speed and ease by consuming a sugary drink or snack? Well, easy as it can be to treat, the effects of a hypo can be frightening, embarrassing, uncomfortable, unpleasant, or in their worst cases, fatal. Getting sweaty, having slurred speech, shaking, feeling tearful, or acting confused may not seem too bad in the whole scheme of things, but having them occur in a job interview or important work meeting, whilst driving home at night or on a romantic date may not be so pleasant! It’s important to realise that this anxiety actually makes sense when we look at it from an evolutionary point of view. We are hard-wired to engage in actions that ensure our survival, and ‘survival’ can be defined broadly: we want to avoid things that will lead to possible rejection from others, and acting oddly whilst in the midst of a hypo is one example of such things. Managing the anxiety The good news is that fear of hypos can be managed, here are some strategies to help: What are you worried about Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms - Social Anxiety Forum

Diabetes Symptoms - Social Anxiety Forum

Originally Posted by ManOnTheMOON View Post Have you been drinking alot of pop or sugar. If so you might have insulin resistance. I used to drink alot as a teenager. But when my mom got diabetes a few years ago, I drink it once in a while. All those symptoms can be attributed to anxiety disorder. I'm also a type 1 diabetic. Those are pretty much the problems I had when I was diagnosed, but like the poster above stated, they were VERY severe. Like I had to drink GALLONS of liquid every day, I lost about 25 pounds in 2 weeks, I lived in the bathroom. As my condition worsened, my vision was a COMPLETE blur, like almost completely blind, and I couldn't even make it up stairs without collapsing. I do not recall having itchy skin, but it was a long time ago. By the time I finally went to the hospital I couldn't even walk. For me it was constant...so the 'happens mainly on weekdays while you work' might suggest that it is something else. Do you have a high-stress job that boosts your anxiety? My blood sugar level was well over 700 and I had a DEADLY amount of ketones in my urine. So if it is diabetes, the blood and urine tests would have picked it up. If you suffer from General Anxiety Disorder, it is probably just a result of that, which would explain why others here have had the same symptoms. I know GAD causes excessive thirst, which would explain the excessive urination. Fatigue, blurred vision, and itchy skin are also symptoms. Wow! thats horrible. How long were you experiencing it befor you went to the hospital? I'm going to do some research on GAD. Thanks Continue reading >>

Health Anxiety For Diabetics Is As Bad As For Neurologicalpatients

Health Anxiety For Diabetics Is As Bad As For Neurologicalpatients

Too many doctors get things exactly the wrong way round. I spent the first fifty years of my life with doctors trying to find psychiatric explanations as to why I was pretending to be ill for sympathy while being so stupid that I failed to notice that I never got any. They were so intent on my psychiatric symptoms being the cause of everything else that they completely failed to notice all the symptoms I was making up just happened to be symptoms of diabetes and conditions that are common in diabetics. Which makes me highly intelligent since the age of 5 or 6, as I never made up symptoms of other conditions. It took buying this house from a pharmacist to find out what was actually occurring, she suggested she sell me a glucometer so by the time I saw my new GP I had a bunch of BG readings which prompted her to give me a GTT. I was only a whisker away from an actual diabetes diagnosis but it became obvious there was something drastically wrong with my glucose/insulin axis, namely a lack of Phase 1 insulin response with an overactive Phase 2 insulin (plus massive IR) causing Reactive Hypoglycemia, a condition doctors have been told NOT to diagnose. The huge drops in BG a few hours after eating were causing a dump of cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine etc. which caused my response to minor stress or no stress to resemble that to major levels of stress. Now I eat low carb/ketogenic and my BG an insulin levels have evened out this no longer occurs and most of my psychiatric symptoms along with my physical symptoms have improved or been completely eliminated. All my health markers have improved or normalised and have remained that way for over a decade now. Pity someone didnt spot this earlier, I might have had a much better life. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic With Health Anxiety Advice And Support Needed.

Type 1 Diabetic With Health Anxiety Advice And Support Needed.

Type 1 Diabetic with Health anxiety advice and support needed. Type 1 Diabetic with Health anxiety advice and support needed. Hello, I am a type 1 diabetic and have been so for 14 years since my diagnosis in 2001. I was diagnosed aged 5 and am now 19. In the past i was never really clued up about the risks of having diabetes, and the long term problems it could cause. My parents were always there to keep me right, but tended to just react to high or low blood glucose rather than making the effort to tightly control my diabetes. I have had a bit of a difficult upbringing (My mother is rather mental and hard to live with, and my father left us when i was 12 due to my mothers attitude after her 6 month spell in prison. My grandparents and father looked after my 2 siblings and myself whilst she was away. My family home which was once a reasonably happy and controlled place sharp became a doss house full of radgies and charvers pumped full of drugs my mam would let in and welcome as her friends) Through my teenage years i was very naive and would make some bad decisions regarding my health such as skipping insulin doses, leaving blood sugars to run high and going on wild benders with friends taking all sorts of substance as i wanted to have a good time. I also have been a regular cannabis user from age 13 until recently when i decided to stop for a while and now am smoking occasionally due to the amplified anxiety i get from heavy usage (i do not believe cannabis is the route cause for my anxiety but when i started becoming anxious the weed wasnt helping at all). When i was 16, in January 2012 i was admitted to hospital with DKA as i hadnt been testing or controlling my sugars and just living to party (I never thought anything bad would happen back then)... so i fell asleep Continue reading >>

Diabetes Or Hypochodria? - No More Panic

Diabetes Or Hypochodria? - No More Panic

For the past 5 mon the I've been terrified of having type 2 diabetes. I virtually have very little symptoms but the symptoms I do have made me worry to no end. I don't have blurry vision, exessive thrist or hunger but ever since I started to worry about type 2 diabetes I've been peeing a lot. The fears are on and off. A few weeks I stop worrying and the next few I am. I notice when I'm not worrying I pee only 4 or 5 times a day but when I worry I pee every 2-3 hours. I'm only 18 and have no family history of Diabetes. I'd go to the Hospital but I can't afford it at the moment and I heard the test you can buy at the store aren't that reliable. Any advice? For the past 5 mon the I've been terrified of having type 2 diabetes. I virtually have very little symptoms but the symptoms I do have made me worry to no end. I don't have blurry vision, exessive thrist or hunger but ever since I started to worry about type 2 diabetes I've been peeing a lot. The fears are on and off. A few weeks I stop worrying and the next few I am. I notice when I'm not worrying I pee only 4 or 5 times a day but when I worry I pee every 2-3 hours. I'm only 18 and have no family history of Diabetes. I'd go to the Hospital but I can't afford it at the moment and I heard the test you can buy at the store aren't that reliable. Any advice? Certainly sounds like your anxious mind is playing a number on you. Which is what anxiety does. Anixety is known to cause increase urination and bowel movements and a HUGE laundry list of other things. Thing to remember about fear--- Fearing something has no bearing on whether you get a disease or not. So while Type 2 is terrifying to you, it does not mean it is any where close to you having the disease. If you were to go running to the hospital, it would be a colassal Continue reading >>

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