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Headaches And Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Why Does High (or Low) Blood Sugar Give Me Headaches?

Susan B. Sloane, BS, RPh, CDE, has been a registered pharmacist for more than 20 years and a Certified Diabetes Educator for more than 15 years. Her two sons were diagnosed with diabetes, and since then, she has been dedicated to promoting wellness and optimal outcomes as a patient advocate, information expert, educator, and corporate partner. Headaches can be debilitating, and patients with diabetes can get headaches from blood sugars dropping too low or climbing too high. As if we didn’t have enough to think about, right? There are many factors that can trigger headaches or even migraines, and blood sugar fluctuations are just one of those factors. The key to avoiding blood sugar-related headaches is keeping blood sugars from spiking or dropping too rapidly. For example, when you are treating a low blood sugar, don’t go on a high carbohydrate-eating binge, even though you may be ravenous. Eat a sensible meal with some protein as directed by your healthcare provider. When blood sugar is too low One of the suspected causes of low blood sugar-caused headaches has to do with the blood vessels in your brain. Your brain needs a readily available supply of glucose in order to function properly. If the brain senses it does not have enough sugar, blood vessels in the brain can spasm, triggering a headache. In the fasting state, stress hormones are also released which can cause vasoconstriction leading to headache. There is also a type of headache that can be seen in patients with diabetes that experience frequent low blood sugars, which are followed by rebound high blood sugars. This rebound phenomenon is often due to hormones that the body releases in response to a low blood sugar in an attempt to regulate itself. When blood sugar is too high High blood sugars can cause l Continue reading >>

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

What Does A Diabetic Headache Feel Like?

About Diabetes & Diabetic Headache When your body's ability to use or produce insulin gets impaired, it gives way to a disease known as diabetes. Insulin is a hormone which helps the body to use glucose or sugar derived from the food we eat to give us energy or store it for future use. Made in the pancreas, insulin also helps prevent the blood sugar levels from getting both too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia). There are 2 types of Diabetes. In the Type 1 Diabetes, the pancreas in unable to produce insulin without which excess amounts of sugar remain in the blood, become toxic over time and lead to headaches, blindness, neuropathy and fatigue. In Type 2 Diabetes, cellular resistance to insulin occurs in the body and is not diagnosed till severe symptoms such as diabetic headaches start to reveal itself. Understanding what a diabetic headache or the symptoms of a diabetic headache is not easy and in some cases the patient is unable to bear the pain associated with the same. Let us analyze what a diabetic headache feels like. What Does a Diabetic Headache Feel Like? The cause of the diabetic headache determines its feeling and extent. There are certain symptoms and signs which help determine the type of diabetic headache that you are suffering from. Let us analyze each of these types of diabetic headaches and the feeling associated with it. High blood glucose of hyperglycemia occurs when there is insufficient production of insulin in the pancreas or the body develops cellular resistance to the same. Occurring in both types of diabetes, it can prove to be fatal for some patients as the high concentration of glucose in the blood can prove toxic for the blood nerves or vessels. The problem with this condition is that many patients are unable to feel the symptom Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

We all get the odd headache. In fact, 15 per cent of Australians will have popped a painkiller to treat one by the time you finish reading this story. People living with diabetes, however, are more likely to be hit with headaches than the rest of the population, and having diabetes may even increase your migraine risk. ‘Headaches are one of the most common complaints doctors are presented with,’ says Dr Tony Bartone, president of the Australian Medical Association (AMA) Victoria. ‘That, combined with the fact they can be caused by a variety of things, means it’s understandable that some people may not make the link between their diabetes and their headaches.’ Find the link and you are halfway to solving the problem. Here’s what to look for… High or low blood glucose levels A headache can be a symptom of hypo- or hyper glycaemia – when blood glucose levels go too low or too high. Low blood glucose levels trigger the release of hormones that cause vasoconstriction – a narrowing of the blood vessels – which may bring on a headache. High BGLs can cause you to run to the loo more often, which sometimes leads to dehydration and, in turn, a headache. THE FIX: As soon as you feel a headache coming on, test your blood glucose levels. This is especially important if you frequently wake up with a pounding head, which could be a sign of nocturnal hypoglycaemia (going too low overnight) if you take insulin or certain other medications. See your doctor if you suspect this is the cause of your headaches. If your levels are low, treat them with 15g of fast-acting carbohydrate and monitor your symptoms as your blood glucose levels return to normal. Once they stabilise, the headache may ease. On the other hand, if your levels are high, exercise may help, but first che Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Diabetes is a condition where the body cannot make enough of the hormone insulin, or cannot use it properly, causing glucose to build up in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. Diabetes does not usually cause headaches. But, while headaches are not dangerous, they may be an indication of poor blood sugar control in a person with diabetes. Over time, periods of continuous high or low blood sugar can lead to serious and even life-threatening health complications, such as heart disease and kidney failure. This article looks at the connection between diabetes and headaches and suggests ways to relieve diabetes-induced headaches. Contents of this article: Types of headache According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, published by the International Headache Society, there are over 150 types of headaches. Broadly speaking, headaches can be classified as either primary or secondary: Primary headaches are ones that are not linked to another medical condition. Examples of primary headaches include migraines and tension headaches. Secondary headaches are caused by underlying medical conditions or health issues and include the type of headache often experienced by people with diabetes. Other causes of secondary headaches include: hormone fluctuations infection nerve disorders overuse of medication trauma The pain associated with either primary or secondary headaches can vary in severity and duration. Some people may not experience headaches often, while others can get a headache several days each week. Depending on the type of headache, other symptoms may be present. For example, migraines can be linked with nausea and increased sensitivity to sound or light. Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia is the medical condition of having an abnormally low blood sugar (glucose) level, and can be responsible for triggering or exacerbating migraine and other headaches The importance of blood-glucose We need energy to function, and most of this energy comes from consuming carbohydrates (sugars). Our bodies convert these carbohydrates into glucose (which is easier to use), and is then carried in the blood to whichever parts of the body need it. The brain requires a continuous supply of glucose from the blood in order to function, and if glucose levels drop (as in hypoglycaemia) the brain is one of the first organs affected. Maintaining blood-glucose levels Our bodies have to keep their blood-glucose levels from becoming too low or too high, and they do this using two fast-acting hormones: insulin and glucagon. When blood-glucose levels get too high, insulin acts to bring them down; when levels get too low, glucagon pushes them back up. Causes of hypoglycaemia If we don’t eat enough calories for our bodies’ needs, then our blood-glucose levels drop too low. This can happen if we skip meals, fast, diet, or exercise on insufficient food. Eating a high-sugar meal can cause ‘reactive hypoglycaemia’, because the sudden rise in blood-glucose from the sugary food triggers an over-production of insulin, which in turn makes the blood-glucose levels fall too low. If diabetes patients inject too much insulin into their bodies, it can also cause their blood-glucose levels to fall too low. Symptoms of hypoglycaemia The brain not receiving enough glucose causes most of the symptoms of hypoglycaemia, which include: headache, migraine, confusion, nausea, sweating, faintness, and hypothermia. If the hypoglycaemia is very severe and prolonged, it can even cause loss-of-c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetes impairs your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels and generates energy. In type I diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar remains in the blood and becomes toxic, leading to fatigue, neuropathy, headaches, blindness and death if left untreated. Type II diabetes is developmental and involves cellular resistance to insulin, which doctors usually don't diagnose until patients report obvious symptoms such as chronic headaches. Video of the Day Hyperglycemia occurs when too much glucose circulates in the blood owing to either lack of insulin production in the pancreas or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of both types of diabetes and is a serious condition because high concentrations of glucose are toxic to nerves and blood vessels. According to the Mayo Clinic, headache is an early symptom of hyperglycemia and frequently includes blurred vision, fatigue and confusion. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can cause a buildup of ketones, which are waste products in the blood and urine, leading to coma and death. Hypoglycemia occurs when too little glucose is in the blood or getting into cells, where the body uses it for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanage your insulin therapy and take too much. If you don't have diabetes, failure to eat enough nutrients such as carbohydrates that the body can easily break down to glucose molecules can result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the primary source of energy for brain function. According to the American Heart Association, a dull headache is a common, early sign of hypoglycemia and often includes related symptoms such as dizziness, Continue reading >>

Type 2 - I Wake Up To Throbbing Headaches At Night | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - I Wake Up To Throbbing Headaches At Night | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 I wake up to throbbing headaches at night Hi guys! Im so glad I found this place. Its so helpful. I was diagnosed with Type 2 four days before Christmas, so you can imagine Im still working on coming to terms with everything. Im on metformin 500g twice daily. I had blood tests yesterday(after 3 weeks) so Im waiting for the results. For three nights now I have been waking up in the middle of the night with a pounding headache and its really scary. At the moment I dont really understand much so I panic because I dont know whether my BG are over or below. Should I grab something to eat or not? Or just down some water or what? This is definitely going to be a long and bumpy road for me Rachox Type 2 (in remission!) Moderator Hi Mandi and welcome to the Forum. Youve come to the right place, First let me tag in @daisy1 wholl post loads of useful links to info for you. Your sentence that jumps out at me is I dont know if my BG is over or below. Most of us here advocate self testing so that we know what our blood sugars are. Many NHS staff dont support this so youll probably have to fund a meter and test strips yourself but it means youre not in the dark about your levels. As you are only on Metformin you are very unlikely to go hypo (low blood sugar), your headaches are more likely to be because you are hyper (high). Any way ask any questions you want, theres always someone around to help to make your road less bumpy. I got my Type 2 under control with help from this fant Continue reading >>

What Cause Headaches In Diabetes?

What Cause Headaches In Diabetes?

People suffering from diabetes are highly susceptible to headaches. In fact, persistent headache is an obvious sign of diabetes. Diabetes headaches can be due to various reasons. Hyperglycemia is a term that refers to having too much glucose circulating in the blood as a result of  lack of insulin production in the pancreas, or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a serious condition since high concentrations of glucose can be toxic to the blood vessels and the nerves. According to health experts, headache is considered an early symptom of hyperglycemia and is usually accompanied with fatigue, confusion and blurred vision. In the absence of  insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can lead to the buildup of ketones which are waste products in both the urine and blood. Buildup of ketones that can lead to coma and death. Hypoglycemia happens when there is too little amount of glucose in the blood for the body to use for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanaged your insulin therapy. If you do not have diabetes, not eating enough nutrients like carbohydrates, which the body needs to breakdown to glucose, may result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the main source of energy for the brain. Without enough glucose our brains are not able to function properly. According to the American Heart Association, dull headache is an early sign of hypoglycemia and can come with other related symptoms like cloudy vision, dizziness, sweating, confusion and tremors. If you do not eat sufficient carbohydrates, like fruits, pasta, breads or juices, hypoglycemia can lead to loss of consciousness, convulsions and even death. If you’re suffering from diabetes, then you should know that you’re at high risk of glaucoma. Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes can cause serious health complications. That's why it is very important to know how to spot type 2 diabetes symptoms. Even prediabetes can increase the chance of heart disease, just like type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor about preventive measures you can take now to reduce the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes due to high blood sugar may include: Increased thirst Increased hunger (especially after eating) Unexplained weight loss (even though you are eating and feel hungry) Fatigue (weak, tired feeling) Loss of consciousness (rare) Contact your health care provider if you have any type 2 diabetes symptoms or if you have further questions about type 2 diabetes. It's important to get diabetes testing and start a treatment plan early to prevent serious diabetes complications. Type 2 diabetes is usually not diagnosed until health complications have occurred. Most often, there are no diabetes symptoms or a very gradual development of the above symptoms of type 2 diabetes. In fact, about one out of every four people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it. Other symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually around the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain or unexplained weight loss Velvety dark skin changes of the neck, armpit, and groin, called acanthosis nigricans Numbness and tingling of the hands and feet Erectile dysfunction (impotency) Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

Diabetes And Headaches: Soothing That Aching Head

We’ve all had headaches. Some more than others, I suspect. I woke up the other morning with a pounding headache, as a matter of fact. Having a headache is definitely not the way to start your day. Perhaps not surprisingly, people who have diabetes can certainly get headaches, and apart from the “usual” culprits, these headaches can stem from fluctuations in blood sugar. There are ways to treat and manage them, however. Read on to learn more. What is a headache anyway? Simply put, a headache is a pain that occurs in any part of the head — on the side, in the front, or in the back. The type of headache pain can vary widely, from sharp, to dull, to throbbing. And the frequency of pain may be different — the pain may come on all of a sudden, or more gradually, and it can last an hour or last days. Types of headaches A headache is a headache, right? Not exactly. There are two main forms of headaches: primary and secondary. A primary headache is due to a problem with or overactivity of pain structures in the head, such as blood vessels, nerves, or muscles. Examples of primary headaches include: • Migraines • Cluster headaches • Tension headaches Secondary headaches occur as a symptom of a disease or condition, such as: • Blood clot • Brain aneurysm • Brain freeze (also known as “ice cream headache”) • Brain tumor • Carbon monoxide poisoning • Flu • Ear infection • Sinus infection • Stroke • Concussion • Monosodium glutamate (MSG) • Panic attacks • Changes in hormones Why might diabetes cause headaches? Having diabetes doesn’t necessarily mean that you’ll automatically have headaches. However, diabetes headaches tend to occur due to changes in blood sugar levels. The more “up and down” your blood sugars are, the more likely Continue reading >>

Migraine And Type 2 Diabetes; Is There Any Association?

Migraine And Type 2 Diabetes; Is There Any Association?

Go to: Abstract Migraine headache prevalence and triggers in type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were investigated in previous studies but the results are contradictory. Therefore, in this study we examined the prevalence of migraine headache in diabetic patients in comparison with non-diabetic persons and its predisposing factors in 2014. We enrolled 147 volunteer patients with T2DM and 150 healthy persons referred to the Yazd Diabetes Research Center and the Central Laboratory of Yazd, respectively, in 2014. The data collection instrument was a self-conducted checklist. The checklist contained demographic, anthropometric and clinical characteristics and migraine diagnostic questions according to International Classification of Headache Disorders Second Edition (ICHD-II) criteria. We compared prevalence of migraine between two groups, and also evaluated relationship between above characteristics and migraine prevalence in both groups. The prevalence of migraine in participants of diabetic and non-diabetic was 27.9 and 26 %, respectively (p-value = .406). The prevalence of migraine headache among in diabetic persons was significantly correlated with family history of migraine, diabetes duration and hypoglycemia attacks. Also, the migraine prevalence was significant more prevalent in T2DM patients with duration 6–10 years (p-value = 0.031). The percentage of HbA1C, type of anti-diabetic medication, BMI value and age in diabetic patients did not show any significant association with migraine. Conclusion Although we observed no significant differences in prevalence of migraine between patients with T2DM and non-diabetic age and sex adjusted persons But, the occurrence of hypoglycemia attacks and T2DM duration were related to migraine prevalence. Decreasing hypoglycemia among Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

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