diabetestalk.net

Hba1c Normal Range In Mg/dl

Why The A1c Test Is Important

Why The A1c Test Is Important

The A1c is a blood test, done in a lab, that shows what your average blood sugar has been for the past 3 months. Other names for this test are glycosylated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c. How the A1c Test Works The glucose that the body doesn't store or use for energy stays in the blood and attaches to red blood cells, which live in the bloodstream for about 4 months. The lab test measures the amount of glucose attached to the red blood cells. The amount is the A1c and is shown as a percentage. Your A1c number can give you and your health care team a good idea of how well you've controlled your blood sugar over the previous 2 to 3 months. When you get your A1c result from a Kaiser Permanente lab, you'll also see another number called the estimated Average Glucose, or eAG. Understanding the eAG Your estimated Average Glucose (eAG) number is calculated from the result of your A1c test. Like the A1c, the eAG shows what your average blood sugars have been over the previous 2 to 3 months. Instead of a percentage, the eAG is in the same units (mg/dl) as your blood glucose meter. The chart shows the relationship between the A1c percentage and the eAG. If A1c % is: Your eAG is: 6 126 6.5 140 7 154 7.5 169 8 183 8.5 197 9 212 9.5 226 10 240 10.5 255 11 269 11.5 283 12 298 What the Numbers Mean The A1c and eAG reflect your average blood sugar over a period of time. These numbers help you and your doctor see how well your treatment plan is working. The higher your A1c and eAG numbers are, the higher your chances for having long-term health problems caused by consistently high blood sugar levels. These problems include heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, vision problems, and numbness in your legs or feet. The lower your A1c and eAG numbers, the lower you Continue reading >>

Diabetes Calculators

Diabetes Calculators

HbA1c (%) Estimated Average (eAG) (mg/dL) Estimated Average (eAG) (mmol/l) 5 97 5.4 6 126 7.0 7 154 8.6 8 183 10.2 9 212 11.8 10 240 13.4 11 269 14.9 12 298 16.5 You can use the calculators on this page to convert HbA1c and estimated average blood sugars. You can also convert from mg/dL, the measurements used in the USA, and mmol which is used by most of the rest of the world. Convert Blood Sugar from US (mg/dl) to UK (mmol/L) The difference is that mg/dL is a measure of weight while mmol is a measure of volume. US: UK: (click on other box to calculate) Formulas US (mg/dl) is the UK (mmol/L) number multiplied by 18. UK (mmol/L) is the US (mg/dl) number divided by 18. Convert HbA1c to Average Blood Glucose Reading Enter HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin): % Avg. plasma blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Avg. whole blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Formulas Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mg/dl) = (HbA1c * 35.6) - 77.3 Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mmol/L) = (HbA1c * 1.98) - 4.29 Avg. whole blood glucose = Plasma Blood Glucose / 1.12 Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

What Is Hba1c And A Normal Hba1c Range? Explained In Plain English

What Is Hba1c And A Normal Hba1c Range? Explained In Plain English

Those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may have seen it before, but what is a normal HbA1c range? This article explores what your HbA1c reading should be and how you can improve it. What is HbA1c (Hemoglobin A1c)? HbA1c is a marker that can determine your average blood sugar (glucose) levels over the previous 3-months (1). That means it can be used to assess the quality of your diabetes management, as well as to diagnose pre-diabetes and diabetes. Sometimes HbA1c is also called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c or just A1c. The ‘Hb’ refers to hemoglobin, a part of red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout your body. ‘A1c’ refers to a minor part of hemoglobin that sugar molecules attach to. The amount of sugar attached is directly proportional to the amount of sugar in your blood at a given time, so this reading is used to accurately reflect average blood sugar levels. If you’ve had high blood sugar levels in the past month or so, your HbA1c levels will be higher too. Summary: HbA1c is a marker that reflects your average blood sugar levels in the previous 3 months. It’s also called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c or just A1c. Normal HbA1c Range The HbA1c test is measured as either a percentage or in mmol/mol. Below I’ve listed what is considered a normal HbA1c range, and what values would be considered outside of normal (pre-diabetic or diabetic): HbA1c range for normal (non-diabetic) adults: Below 6.0%, or below 42 mmol/mol HbA1c range for pre-diabetes: 6.0% to 6.4%, or 42 to 47 mmol/mol HbA1c range for diabetes: 6.5% or above, or 48 mmol/mol or above. Target ranges are also shown below in this table: HbA1c % mmol/mol Normal Below 6.0% Below 42 mmol/mol Pre-diabetes 6.0% to 6.4% 42 to 47 mmol/mol Diabetes 6.5% or above 48 mmol/mol or above Normal Hb Continue reading >>

Test Id: Hba1c Hemoglobin A1c, Blood

Test Id: Hba1c Hemoglobin A1c, Blood

Evaluating the long-term control of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients Diagnosing diabetes Identifying patients at increased risk for diabetes (prediabetes) Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder associated with disturbances in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism characterized by hyperglycemia. It is one of the most prevalent diseases, affecting approximately 24 million individuals in the United States. Long-term treatment of the disease emphasizes control of blood glucose levels to prevent the acute complications of ketosis and hyperglycemia. In addition, long-term complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular disease can be minimized if blood glucose levels are effectively controlled. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a result of the nonenzymatic attachment of a hexose molecule to the N-terminal amino acid of the hemoglobin molecule. The attachment of the hexose molecule occurs continually over the entire life span of the erythrocyte and is dependent on blood glucose concentration and the duration of exposure of the erythrocyte to blood glucose. Therefore, the HbA1c level reflects the mean glucose concentration over the previous period (approximately 8-12 weeks, depending on the individual) and provides a much better indication of long-term glycemic control than blood and urinary glucose determinations. Diabetic patients with very high blood concentrations of glucose have from 2 to 3 times more HbA1c than normal individuals. Diagnosis of diabetes includes 1 of the following: -Fasting plasma glucose > or =126 mg/dL -Symptoms of hyperglycemia and random plasma glucose >or =200 mg/dL -Two-hour glucose > or =200 mg/dL during oral glucose tolerance test unless there is unequivocal hyperglycemia, confirmatory testing should be Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Tweet Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. This page states 'normal' blood sugar ranges and blood sugar ranges for adults and children with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and blood sugar ranges to determine people with diabetes. If a person with diabetes has a meter, test strips and is testing, it's important to know what the blood glucose level means. Recommended blood glucose levels have a degree of interpretation for every individual and you should discuss this with your healthcare team. In addition, women may be set target blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The following ranges are guidelines provided by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) but each individual’s target range should be agreed by their doctor or diabetic consultant. Recommended target blood glucose level ranges The NICE recommended target blood glucose levels are stated below for adults with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and children with type 1 diabetes. In addition, the International Diabetes Federation's target ranges for people without diabetes is stated. [19] [89] [90] The table provides general guidance. An individual target set by your healthcare team is the one you should aim for. NICE recommended target blood glucose level ranges Target Levels by Type Upon waking Before meals (pre prandial) At least 90 minutes after meals (post prandial) Non-diabetic* 4.0 to 5.9 mmol/L under 7.8 mmol/L Type 2 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L under 8.5 mmol/L Type 1 diabetes 5 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L Children w/ type 1 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L *The non-diabetic figures are provided for information but are not part of NICE guidelines. Normal and diabetic blood sugar ranges For the majority of healthy ind Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

Go to: Abstract Objectives: Early diagnosis of diabetes is crucially important in reduction of the complications. Although HbA1c is an accurate marker for the prediction of complications, less information is available about its accuracy in diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, the association between HbA1c and FBS was assessed through a cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A random sample of population in Kerman city was selected. The total number was 604 people. Their HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were tested. The association between HbA1c and FBS and also their sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in detection of abnormal values of each other were determined. The association of HbA1c with FBS was relatively strong particularly in diabetic subjects. Generally, FBS was a more accurate predictor for HbA1c compared with HbA1c as a predictor of FBS. Although the optimum cutoff point of HbA1c was >6.15%, its precision was comparable with the conventional cutoff point of >6%. Conclusions: In conclusion, FBS sounds more reliable to separate diabetic from non-diabetic subjects than HbA1c. In case of being interested in using HbA1c in screening, the conventional cutoff points of 6% is an acceptable threshold for discrimination of diabetics from non-diabetics. Keywords: HbA1c, Blood glucose, Diabetics *The adjusted values were computed in a multivariable regression model with sex, BMI and age as independent variables. Continue reading >>

Relationship Of Fasting And Hourly Blood Glucose Levels To Hba1c Values

Relationship Of Fasting And Hourly Blood Glucose Levels To Hba1c Values

Safety, accuracy, and improvements in glucose profiles obtained using a 7-day continuous glucose sensor Abstract OBJECTIVE—In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of 7-day transcutaneous, real-time, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in subjects with insulin-requiring diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Eighty-six subjects were enrolled at five U.S. centers. Subjects wore a sensor inserted under the skin of the abdomen for 7 days during each of three consecutive periods. Data were blinded during period 1 and unblinded during periods 2 and 3. RESULTS—Of the 6,811 matched self-monitoring of blood glucose to sensor values prospectively analyzed, 97.2% fell in the Clarke error grid zones A and B, and median absolute relative difference was 11.4%. After unblinding, subjects reduced time spent at <55 mg/dl by 0.3 h/day, reduced time spent at >240 mg/dl by 1.5 h/day, and increased time in the target zone (81–140 mg/dl) by 1.4 h/day (P < 0.05 for all three comparisons). Improvements were seen in both types 1 and 2 diabetes and with use of both multiple daily injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Modal day graphs were generated in six groups of subjects based on HbA1c (A1C) (≤6, 6–7, 7–8, 8–9, 9–10, and >10%). Mean glucose levels from midnight to 7:00 a.m. (fasting and dawn phenomenon periods) were only normal for subjects with A1C ≤6%. All other groups were hyperglycemic during this and all periods. Reductions in overall mean glucose were achieved for the four highest A1C groupings with unblinded device use. CONCLUSIONS—This is the first report of a real-time, transcutaneous glucose sensor that functioned for 7 days. The use of CGM in the unblinded phase resulted in improvements in target-range glycemia across all A1C valu Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Understanding Your Lab Test Results

Diabetes is a chronic condition that requires an enormous amount of self-care and that can affect many parts of the body. Because of this, people who have diabetes are generally advised to visit their doctors multiple times a year and also to see various specialists (such as endocrinologists, podiatrists, and eye doctors) periodically to screen for potential problems and treat any complications that arise. Along with blood pressure readings and inspection of the feet and eyes, there are a number of laboratory tests recommended by the American Diabetes Association. These tests are used to track blood glucose control, kidney function, cardiovascular health, and other areas of health. Although you certainly can’t and won’t be expected to analyze the lab report when your test results come back, knowing a little bit about what your report says can be a way for you to more fully understand and take charge of your health. If it isn’t already your doctor’s regular practice to give you copies of your lab reports, ask for a copy the next time you have lab tests done. Use the information in this article to learn more about what lab reports show, and discuss your results with your doctor to learn what your results mean with regards to your health. Lab reports All lab reports share certain standard features, regardless of the test(s) they show. A Federal law, the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act, regulates all aspects of clinical laboratory testing. It states exactly what information must be included in your lab test report. Some of the standard features include the following: • Your name and a unique identification number, which may be either your birth date or a medical record number assigned to you by the lab. • The name and address of the lab that tested your bloo Continue reading >>

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

Decoding Hba1c Test For Blood Sugar - Normal Reading For The Hba1c Calculator

Decoding HbA1c Test for Blood Sugar - Normal reading for the HbA1c Calculator Decoding HbA1c Test for Blood Sugar - Normal reading for the HbA1c Calculator Written by Tanya Thomas |Medically Reviewed by Dr. Sunil Shroff on Apr 01, 2016 What is considered a normal reading for the HbA1c calculator? Recommended HbA1c readings fall within the reference range of 6.5 to 7%. This implies that for every 100 red blood cells, 6-7 cells have glucose attached to them. Mean blood sugar levels can be better understood from the following table. Normal range for non-diabetics (pre-prandial) High possibility of serious electrolyte imbalance!! Blood Glucose, post-prandial, After meal, Micromat, Diastat, VARIANT, Immunoturbidimetric, hemoglobin testing system, diabetes monitoring, beta-thalassemia, hemoglobinopathy, sickle cell disease mg/dL mmol/L: Divide by 18 (or multiply by 0.055) Or, you could simply use Medindias Blood Sugar Converter available at or our HbA1c1c1c(A1c) Calculator for Blood Glucose. Since glucose binds slowly to Hemoglobin A (and decomposes at about the same rate), the HbA1c count is a good indicator of average blood glucose over a period of time. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1c of 7% (implying 7 cells out of every 100 have an appendage of blood glucose) or lower. But deciding upon a generalized perfect blood sugar value is impossible as this varies from person to person. Continue reading >>

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Tweet Use this calculator to convert HbA1c to Average Blood Sugar Level. The HbA1c level in your blood indicates what your average blood glucose level has been in the past 2 to 3 months. Everyone, whether non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, type 1 diabetic or type 2 diabetic has some degree of sugar in their blood. To convert between mg/dl and mmol/L, use our blood sugar converter. You can then convert average blood glucose levels back to HbA1c units with the calculator below. mmol/L Recommended HbA1c ranges The recommended HbA1c range for most with diabetes is to keep the value under 48 mmols/mol (under 6.5% in the old percentage units). People at risk of hypoglycemia, or for whom such tight blood glucose regulation is not advised, may be advised to keep their HbA1c below 59 mmols/mol (under 7.5% in the old percentage units). Because the two tests measure two different things, the calculator can only give an estimate and therefore there will always be some discrepancy between the value provided by the calculator and actual lab test results. How accurate are the results? The calculator looks to provide an estimate of what your HbA1c value may be based upon your average blood glucose results and vice versa. It’s important to note that HbA1c and blood glucose tests measure different things. Blood glucose tests measure the concentration of glucose molecules in the blood at a single point in time. The HbA1c test measures the proportion of haemoglobin molecules in the blood that have become chemically bonded with glucose over a period of up to 3 months. However, the calculator serves as a useful guide which can give you a close indication of what your HbA1c result might be based on your blood glucose results? What can I learn from converting my average blood glucose level to HbA1c Continue reading >>

Hba1c

Hba1c

HbA1c Calculator With this tool you can easily convert HbA1c values from % (NGSP) to mmol/mol (IFCC) and vice versa. In addition, average blood glucose levels can be determined in mg/dL and mmol/L. By insertion of any value all other fields will update automatically. Background The International Consensus Statement of US and European Diabetes Associations recommend consistent standardization of the HbA1c determination to the IFCC1 reference measurement procedure, using the new unit mmol/mol. Since these new values in mmol/mol differ from values determined by the standardization according to NGSP2, it is recommended that HbA1c results should be reported in both units, mmol/mol (SI unit) and derived NGSP units (in %). By means of the calculator above, IFCC values in mmol/mol can be converted into NGSP values in % and vice versa. 1International Federation of Clinical Chemistry 2National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Programme Continue reading >>

Overview Of Diabetes

Overview Of Diabetes

Diagnosis The biochemical hallmark of diabetes is elevated blood glucose. Therefore, diagnosis of diabetes is made by estimation of glucose concentrations in the blood. When the fasting plasma glucose is ≥ 126 mg/dl or random blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl on more than one occasion.1 Fasting Plasma Glucose: Elevated fasting plasma glucose is always regarded to have a high degree of specificity for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is more consistent and reproducible than postprandial plasma glucose because there are more variable in the latter, such as timing and carbohydrate load. FPG may be easier to control with medications than PPG. An overnight fasting for 8 – 12 hours is considered desirable. The ADA and WHO have recommended FPG value of ≥ 126 mg/dl as the diagnostic value for diabetes and the value of 110 – 125 mg/dl have been termed as impaired fasting glucose which is a prediabetic stage.1 Postprandial Blood Glucose: The word postprandial means after a meal and hence it refers to plasma glucose concentration after food intake. The optimal time to measure postprandial glucose concentrations is 2 hr after the start of a meal. An elevated PPG concentration is one of the earliest abnormalities of type 2 diabetes, and represents an independent risk for cardiovascular disease. Postprandial changes precipitate atherosclerosis before FPG concentrations are affected. The recommended PPG goal of treatment is a value of <160mg/dl. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test It is recommended for diagnosis/exclusion for diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done in the morning after 8-10hrs of overnight fast (water may be taken). A fasting blood sample should be taken before giving glucose load. The person then drinks 75gm of glucose in 250-300 ml of water (the glucose load Continue reading >>

More in diabetes