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Hba1c Meter

Hba1c Conversion Chart

Hba1c Conversion Chart

The HbA1c test measures how much haemoglobin in the blood has become glycated (chemically bonded with glucose). ••••• HbA1c values have changed and are now reported as a measurement in mmols/mol instead of the percentage previously given. To make sense of the new units and compare these with old units and vice versa, use our HbA1c units converter table below. Old unit = NGSP unit = %HbA1c New unit = IFCC unit = mmol/mol HbA1c Old HbA1c New HbA1c Old HbA1c New 4.0 20 8.1 65 4.1 21 8.2 66 4.2 22 8.3 67 4.3 23 8.4 68 4.4 25 8.5 69 4.5 26 8.6 70 4.6 27 8.7 72 4.7 28 8.8 73 4.8 29 8.9 74 4.9 30 9.0 75 5.0 31 9.1 76 5.1 32 9.2 77 5.2 33 9.3 78 5.3 34 9.4 79 5.4 36 9.5 80 5.5 37 9.6 81 5.6 38 9.7 83 5.7 39 9.8 84 5.8 40 9.9 85 5.9 41 10 86 6.0 42 10.1 87 6.1 43 10.2 88 6.2 44 10.3 89 6.3 45 10.4 90 6.4 46 10.5 91 6.5 48 10.6 92 6.6 49 10.7 93 6.7 50 10.8 95 6.8 51 10.9 96 6.9 52 11.0 97 7.0 53 11.1 98 7.1 54 11.2 99 7.2 55 11.3 100 7.3 56 11.4 101 7.4 57 11.5 102 7.5 58 11.6 103 7.6 60 11.7 104 7.7 61 11.8 105 7.8 62 11.9 107 7.9 63 12.0 108 8.0 64 Sit down with your child to decide what kind of meter they would prefer out of the options available. Hypos Hypos occur when your blood glucose falls too low. PLAY A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for anyone else. Find out what… Living with diabetes during pregnancy can be challenging, but you can still lead a healthy life. Take control of your… Glucose testing is the process used to measure the amount of glucose in your blood and can be carried out… FreeStyle Optium Neo has a choice of tools designed to help people who use insulin. Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team… Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

A1cnow®+ System

A1cnow®+ System

Lab Quality Results at the Point-of-Care The A1CNow+ system provides healthcare professionals with a fast and easy way of obtaining accurate A1C results with just a fingerstick. This innovative technology enables clinicians to communicate face-to-face with patients about their diabetes control in minutes, not days. In addition, the A1CNow+ system is fully reimbursable. More Efficient than the Lab Portable - use in multiple exam rooms Easy to use - minimal training required Certifications​ FDA-cleared CE References: 1. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Professional Procedure Guide PN 91078 Rev. B. March 2014. 2. Relative to TOSOH certified reference method. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 3. Exhibits a linear dynamic range and precision that meets current NGSP standards. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. 4. Excellent Precision of 2.15% CV and 4.3% CV at the Normal (5.7% HbA1c) and High (8.9% HbA1c) ends of the spectrum. PTS Diagnostics A1CNow+ System Preliminary Performance Data, May 30, 2014. Data on file. Complimentary Whitepaper Download Point-of-Care Alternatives to A1C Testing ​Ease-of-use point-of-care medical devices provide an advantage in measuring HbA1c in situations where clinical laboratory analyzers are unavailable to provide physicians with real-time information to better manage diabetes. The purpose of this whitepaper is to help healthcare professionals understand the viability of portable, point-of-care A1C monitors. What you will learn from this whitepaper: How point-of-care devices are viable alternatives to sending blood to laboratory testing Point-of-care A1C device accuracy evaluations relative to three clinical laboratory HbA1c analyzers Continue reading >>

Hba1c Monitoring

Hba1c Monitoring

Your diabetes team will check your HbA1c regularly during clinic visits. You should talk to your team about the target HbA1c you want to achieve given your lifestyle, activity level and age. What is HbA1c? HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin) is a measure of the amount of glucose attached to the body's red blood cells; it is present in everyone. It gives an indication of your blood glucose control over the last 2-3 months. The level of HbA1c in your body rises and falls in line with your blood glucose - the higher your HbA1c, the more glucose is attached to your red blood cells. Your HbA1c does not change rapidly because the red blood cells in your circulation last for around 3-4 months. Any increases and decreases in your HbA1c will happen over a period of at least 6 weeks. HbA1c is recorded as mmol/mol, and sometimes as a percentage, while blood glucose is recorded in mmol/L. You may be used to seeing your HbA1c reported as a percentage, however from 1 October 2011, HbA1c changed to be given in mmol/mol. An HbA1c test is not the same as a blood glucose test. HbA1c and blood glucose The chart below shows the relationship between the blood glucose level that you measure yourself and your HbA1c measurements from the hospital. HbA1c level (mmol/mol) HbA1c level (%) Average plasma glucose level 42 mmol/mol 6% 7.5 mmol/L 53 mmol/mol 7% 9.4 mmol/L 64 mmol/mol 8% 11.3 mmol/L 75 mmol/mol 9% 13.3 mmol/L 86 mmol/mol 10% 15.3 mmol/L 97 mmol/mol 11% 17.2 mmol/L 108 mmol/mol 12% 19.1 mmol/L Research shows that improved control of HbA1c will decrease the risk of diabetes complications.1 Find out what your HbA1c is and keep a record of it in your blood glucose testing record diary. Remember, the better your blood glucose control specifically after eating, the more likely you are to achie Continue reading >>

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

At Home A1c Testing Systems & Kits: Review

The A1C, a Glycated hemoglobin, is a form of hemoglobin that is measured primarily to identify the three-month average blood glucose concentration. The A1C test is limited to a three-month average because the lifespan of a red blood cell is only four months. In other words, it’s the indication of your blood sugar level for a three-month period. Typically, your doctor will test your A1C levels every 90 to 180 days depending on how well your blood sugar levels have been managed. In basic terms, the A1C test checks to see how much glucose is attaching to your red blood cells. You can work to keep your A1C within your target range using a recommended diabetes management regimen along with a well-managed diet, exercise routine and other healthy lifestyle . Normal a1C Prediabetes a1C Diabetic a1c Under 5.7 5.7 to 6.4 6.5 and above A1C Test Features and Pricing While most hospital conducted A1C tests cost around $86 per test (depending on your co-pay), you can now buy the A1C self-check home kit for around $40. Each kit includes one test with two strips, but you can buy a double test kit as well. The kits are not reusable so once you use your two lancets, you must buy another kit. Use Most people use this test every 30 days instead of waiting 90 days to be seen by the doctor. This helps patients have a more accurate reading on where their levels fall throughout the month. Insurance Coverage Most insurances will cover 1 or 2 tests per year and some hospitals will have a sample take-home A1C test that you can ask for. However, not all hospitals do so you may still need to buy over the counter kits depending on how many results a year you want to have or how many your doctor requires. Pros and Cons of Home Testing The A1C at home kit needs four large drops of blood which is eas Continue reading >>

Managing Hba1c | Pharmaco Diabetes

Managing Hba1c | Pharmaco Diabetes

The HbA1c test is a measure of an average blood glucose (average blood sugar) level over the past few months and can be used as an indicator of your diabetes control.Inside the body the glucose (sugar) sticks to part of the red blood cells called haemoglobin haemoglobin is what gives blood cells their red colour. This sugar-haemoglobin combination is called HbA1c. Once the red blood cells become stuck to the sugar they stay stuck until the red blood cell dies. This takes about 3 months. As red blood cells die, new ones are produced. If the new red blood cells dont end up with glucose stuck to them, because of better blood glucose control, then the overall HbA1c will decrease. The HbA1c counts the number of red blood cells that are attached to glucose and reports it as a percentage. The results are measured as mmol/mol, which is different to your blood glucosetest results that measures the amount of glucose freely circulating in the blood and uses a different unit of measure, mmol/L. Unlike Blood Glucose levels that you do daily with a glucose meter, HbA1c tests need to be done by a health care professional. These are usually done every three months. HbA1c levels give doctors and those living with diabetes valuable information. HbA1c levels do not fluctuatequickly because once the red blood cells are attached to glucose; they remain that way until they die (up to 3 months). For this reason HbA1c levels give a picture of blood glucose control over a long period of time. HbA1c is the only proven indicator of a persons risk of developing complications of diabetes. So why still measure blood glucose levels? HbA1c and Blood Glucose Levels give us two different sets of information. HbA1c provides information about the long-term glucose control to help with overall management Continue reading >>

Hba1c Testing In The Community Pharmacy: A New Strategy To Improve Care For Patients With Diabetes

Hba1c Testing In The Community Pharmacy: A New Strategy To Improve Care For Patients With Diabetes

HbA1c testing in the community pharmacy: A new strategy to improve care for patients with diabetes Copyright 2012 Canadian Pharmacists Association This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in Canada. It is estimated that 2 million Canadians have type 2 diabetes and that there are more than 60,000 new cases of this disease diagnosed each year. The cost of diabetes in Canada is projected to be up to $9 billion annually. 1 One-third of those affected with type 2 diabetes are unaware that they have the disease. 1 Managing diabetes is a challenging endeavour for those diagnosed and involves routine monitoring and regular testing in order for patients to maintain reasonable glycemic control. The DICE study in 2005 found that 1 in 2 Canadians with type 2 diabetes do not have their blood sugar under control and that control is worse the longer patients have had diabetes. 2 As a measure of glycemic control, the Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) recommends glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c [%]) levels 7.0. 3 However, according to one study, only 29% of patients with diabetes actually had an HbA1c test in the previous year, and among those tested, only 43% had an HbA1c less than 7%. 4 Additionally, 18% of those tested had an HbA1c of 9.5% or more, meaning that their blood glucose levels were uncontrolled. 4 Given the complexity of diabetes control, evidence suggests that diabetes can be best managed through an interdisciplinary team that includes a pharmacist. 5 The relative accessibility of the community pharmacist allows patients the opportunity to discuss their health care concerns, typically without the need for a referral or appointment (though making an appointment so that the pharmacist is able to set aside an appropri Continue reading >>

Hba1c Testing - Diamond

Hba1c Testing - Diamond

AMSL Point of Care have partnered with EKF Diagnosticsto bring this uniquediabetes monitoring device to Australia. Using a fingerprick blood sample, DIaMonD delivers an accurate HbA1c test in only four minutes. The test cartridges are stable at room temperature for a month (longer if storedin the fridge) and the analyser itself is light and portable. Why wait for days for a blood sample to be sent off to the laboratoryonly to have the HbA1c result eventually come back? DiaMonD gives you and your patient the result during the consultation. Martin Rocliffe graduated from University of Manchester with a degree in Microbiologybefore gaininglaboratory experience in transfusion medicine, biochemistry and point of care testing. He has 30 years of diagnostic sales & marketing experience throughout UK, Europe, South Africa and Asia Pacific. Martin was theGeneral Manager for Nova Biomedical in the UKbefore joining the newly formed Point of Care division of AMSL in 2010. AMSL is now proudly a market leader in point of care within Australian hospitals. Gwen joined the AMSL Point of Care division in February 2015 with 14 years of sales experience in the medical devices industry. Her role as Point of Care Specialist involves product education and training for healthcare professionals in key hospital accounts across her NSW territory. As part of the team she manages relationships with key stakeholders along the point of care spectrum and delivers ongoing technical training on the StatStrip Glucose & Ketone and StatStrip Lactate Xpress Meters. After graduating with a Bachelor of Biomedical Science, Emma has worked as a medical laboratory scientist in both public and private pathology. Prior to joining AMSL, Emma spent many years with commercial diagnostic companies providing laborator Continue reading >>

A1cnow – Home Hba1c Testing Kit Review

A1cnow – Home Hba1c Testing Kit Review

Tweet A1cNow is a home testing kit for HbA1c. The test requires a drop of blood and allows you to get a good reading of your HbA1c level within a few minutes. The kit allows you to get an up to date HbA1c reading between the official HbA1c tests from your healthcare team. The A1cNow kit should not be used, however, as a replacement for the tests you get from your health team. Summary Overall, the test was swift, easy and provides a very clear, useful result. The process was quick The kit has been designed to make things easy. Result given as a numerical figure is very useful. The instructions are fairly clear and simple but rely on the user’s intuition to correctly interpret the images and a little more wording could help to improve clarity. Getting set up The design of the kit made the set-up fairly easy. The instructions are image based than word based. Whilst the images well laid out, they rely on people’s intuition to make sure they open the right pouch in the right order. It is important that the cartridge pack is not opened too early. Our user had no problem with setting up but felt that some additional words to accompany the images might have helped. Lancing device The lancing device worked as intended. It requires a fairly solid push into the finger. This might perturb some people that are squeamish about finger prick tests, however, our user didn’t have an issue with this. Blood collection The lancing device worked as intended and the blood collection tool is well designed. The part of the process that presented a small issue for our user was that the instructions could have been a little clearer in the use of the blood uptake tool. Our user missed that the blood uptake tool needed to be held horizontally rather than vertically to draw blood. Reagent mixi Continue reading >>

If You Are Living With Diabetes, Chances Are You’ve Taken A Blood Test Known As Hba1c Or Hemoglobin A1c. Hba1c Is A Very Common Test For Diabetes Patients Because It Helps Doctors And Patients Get An Overall Picture Of How The Disease Is Being Managed.

If You Are Living With Diabetes, Chances Are You’ve Taken A Blood Test Known As Hba1c Or Hemoglobin A1c. Hba1c Is A Very Common Test For Diabetes Patients Because It Helps Doctors And Patients Get An Overall Picture Of How The Disease Is Being Managed.

Well you’ve come to the right place because you’re about to learn something really important! First, did you ever stop and wonder why an HbA1C measurement gives you an “average” blood glucose range covering a period of approximately 2 to 3 months? Well, the answer is because this test essentially measures the amount of glucose attached to red blood cells, and these cells travel around your body and recycle about every three months. An HbA1C level of a non-diabetic individual is generally below 5.7%. According to the CDC, prediabetes is indicated by an HbA1C measurement of 5.7 to 6.4%.[1] The ADA (American Diabetes Association) agrees, and says an A1C level of 6.5% or higher indicates if someone has diabetes.[2] Since HbA1C levels are measured on a 2 to 3 month timeframe, it might be hard to digest exactly what this means on a day-to-day level. Therefore, to give you a better perspective of what these numbers mean in terms of everyday blood glucose measurements here’s a chart that approximately translates HbA1C levels into mg/dL levels: As you can see, a hemoglobin A1C measure of 7% equates to an average blood glucose level of about 154 mg/dL. Where do you stand in relation to this chart? If you are “north of 7%,” don’t be hard on yourself. Some of this might be attributed to genes and some maybe lifestyle choices you made. And even though you cannot go back in time, you have the power to make changes going forward. So, what’s tomorrow going to bring? You have the power to make changes and we’re going to show you the 5 Step Power Plan to help you lower your A1C and the little device that’s known to simplify diabetes management! But first, anyone living with diabetes knows that managing everything that surrounds the disease is a balancing act that re Continue reading >>

New Hba1c Meter Chosen For Study Trial

New Hba1c Meter Chosen For Study Trial

On November 28, 2000, Bio-Rad Labratories announced that its new instrument for measuring HbA1c levels, called Micromat II, was chosen for use in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. The ACCORD trial is aimed at reducing cardiovascular disease in people with type 2 diabetes. The test will be used to measure the patients HbA1c levels at 60 different test sites throughout the U.S. and Canada. We are pleased to be part of the NIH ACCORD study, said John Hertia, director of Business and Technology Development at Bio-Rad in the press release. Bio-Rad Laboratories of Hercules, California designed the portable instrument that allows an HbAIc to be measured in five minutes. For more information, call (800) 224-6723 or log onto their Web site at www.bio-rad.com . Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. A few facts about me in case you are new to my column and site. My life in the diabetes community started at a young age as the secret keeper of my maternal and paternal Grandmothers. They both had type 2 diabetes and my days spent a Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test Results Don't Tell The Full Story

Hba1c Test Results Don't Tell The Full Story

back to Overview When I was a teenager, the HbA1c test results cut straight through my lies and made-up paper logbook. It’s often viewed as the number to rule all numbers. But hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test results can be misleading and don’t tell the full story. As I learned in my teens, the HbA1c test shines a light on things I was trying to hide. Overall, It’s not good at getting to the details of blood sugars, but when used with other pieces of information it can draw attention to (sometimes unseen) problem areas in our diabetes management, and that’s a good thing. How do HbA1c test results work? Let’s take a quick look at the basics of the HbA1c test. A certain amount of sugar in your blood sticks to your red blood cells and can’t be unstuck. It’s there for the life of the cell, which is, on average, about 8-12 weeks. Those red blood cells in your body are constantly recycled, and by checking your HbA1c value every 8-12 weeks (or as often as recommended by your doctor – the ADA recommends at least twice a year), you get to see a fresh new grouping of them. So – A higher blood sugar for a longer time means more sugar on more cells – which means a higher HbA1c. Get it? Ideal HbA1c range HbA1c goals are very individual, which makes sense. We’re all different, right? Of course, there are reference values as a guide, and that’s a good place to start. The ADA suggests an HbA1c of 7%, but also say that “more or less stringent glycemic goals may be appropriate for each individual.” Why have different goals? Because, as you know, there’s a lot to consider with diabetes. Avoiding lows (hypoglycemia) while pushing for lower A1c’s is really important because low blood sugars are immediately dangerous. It’s simply not safe to push for a very low H Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test Kits: Home A1c Testing Kits

Hba1c Test Kits: Home A1c Testing Kits

Tweet Home HbA1c testing kits allow you the chance to get a good idea of your HbA1c level. This can be useful in between getting scheduled HbA1c tests from your doctor. Note that home HbA1c tests should not be used as a substitute for the tests from your doctor and should be not be used in place of an official diagnosis. How home HbA1c test kits work Home HbA1c tests can often be carried out within a relatively short space of time. Most home HbA1c tests require a sample of blood from the finger which is then applied to a solution. The solution usually requires a small bit of processing, which can vary depending on the kit. The solution may require one or more of the following: shaking, heating or letting to stand. The solution is then applied to a reagent. The result may be given in different ways depending on the kit. Some kits provide a numeric result, others may provide a yes or no answer as to whether the HbA1c value is above or below a certain number. Make sure you read the instructions through carefully before beginning. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they Continue reading >>

Test Hba1c With Our Fast, Easy And Reliable Point-of-care System

Test Hba1c With Our Fast, Easy And Reliable Point-of-care System

HemoCue® HbA1c 501 System is a fast, easy and reliable point-of-care system for hemoglobin A1c tests. It is a fully automated HbA1c POC test that provides reliable results straight away for efficient diabetes care. HemoCue® HbA1c 501 System is not available in the US. For corresponding US product see www.hemocue.us. Stop sending samples to labs and waiting for results Having to send blood samples to the lab and wait for the results to come back can be very frustrating. Not only is it time-consuming, it also delays the treatment of the diabetes patients. As a medical professional, you should be able to carry out tests fast and easy at the point of care, and provide your patients with reliable result straight away. An automated system for HbA1c testing HemoCue® HbA1c 501 System is a fully automated point-of-care system for testing HbA1c. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a glycated form of Hb that is tested primarily to identify the average amount of glucose (sugar) present in patients’ blood over the past three months. Blood sugar testing is an important part of the diabetes care and necessary for millions of diabetics. Treat and follow up your patients fast and efficiently Our HemoCue® HbA1c 501 System provides useful information for diabetes management. It targets primarily medical professionals who want to treat and follow up their diabetes patients fast and efficiently. As a medical professional, it helps you identify glucose levels and monitor the effect of diabetes medication as well as evaluate how well the overall treatment is working for your patients. Moreover, the system makes your entire work process easier and more efficient. Advantages of using our point-of-care system Our HemoCue® HbA1c 501 System brings many advantages into your work process. It provides a Continue reading >>

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