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Hba1c Fasting

Blood Sugar Tests

Blood Sugar Tests

A test that measures blood sugar levels. Elevated levels are associated with diabetes and insulin resistance, in which the body cannot properly handle sugar (e.g. obesity). Goal values: Less than 100 mg/dL = normal Between 110–125 mg/dL = impaired fasting glucose (i.e., prediabetes) Greater than 126 mg/dL on two or more samples = diabetes Preparation This test requires a 12-hour fast. You should wait to eat and/or take a hypoglycemic agent (insulin or oral medication) until after test has been drawn, unless told otherwise. Eating and digesting foods called carbohydrates forms glucose (blood sugar). Glucose is needed by your body to provide energy to carry out your normal activities. Insulin is needed by the body to allow glucose to go into the cells and be used as energy. Without insulin, the levels of glucose in the blood will rise. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when either the pancreas (an organ in your body) is not able to produce insulin or the pancreas makes insulin, but it does not work as it should. Fasting blood sugar is a part of diabetic evaluation and management. An FBS greater than 126 mg/dL on more than one occasion usually indicates diabetes. Glycosylated Hemoglobin or Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) Reflects average blood sugar levels over the preceding 90-day period. Elevated levels are associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have an increased risk of a cardiac event. A diabetic person's risk for heart attack is the same as a non-diabetic person, who has experienced one heart attack, having a second heart attack. Aggressive global preventive risk reduction efforts, such as lower LDL targets, diet, exercise and blood pressure control, are recommended. Goal values (per American Diabetes Association guidelines): A range of 5.7-6.4 p Continue reading >>

Hba1c Vs Blood Glucose: Knowing The Difference

Hba1c Vs Blood Glucose: Knowing The Difference

With the myriad of tests available to the general public serving to empower individuals in terms of wellbeing, it has become necessary to familiarise one’s self with the relevance and where possible, the difference, between tests previously thought of as the same or similar. For example, being assessed for a specific condition may require a more in-depth view than is commonly perceived. With this in mind, we look at the difference between the Blood Glucose and the HbA1c tests and why the one is more effective in managing an individual’s diabetic status than the other. Random Glucose test Activity levels, stress, types of food, infection and / or illness can affect glucose levels. The amount of food consumed and periods between meals also play a role in determining blood sugar levels. Generally, blood sugar levels are at their lowest after overnight fasting, or in instances where a meal has not been consumed for a period of at least eight hours. Blood sugar levels are raised to their highest levels within an hour of eating foods that are high in carbohydrates, such as potatoes, chocolate, bread, rice and pasta. Blood sugar levels are measured in two ways i.e. molar concentrations, measured in mmol/L (millimoles per litre) and mass concentration which is measured in mg/dL (milligrams per decilitre). The above graph depicts just how an individual’s Random Glucose level fluctuates throughout the day. Mealtimes such as breakfast, lunch and dinner produce spikes in the Glucose levels as expected. This person may still be diabetic or prediabetic, however, as we can see from the above, this method of diagnosis may be inaccurate. In terms of managing one’s day to day diet however, this test could prove useful, specifically for individuals using insulin. HBA1C test When s Continue reading >>

Fasting For Hba1c

Fasting For Hba1c

Author Topic: Fasting for HbA1c (Read 21172 times) 0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. Is it necessary to fast prior to an HbA1c? When my GP sent me for a set of blood tests her smiled and said no need to fasrt this time. However when I turned up at the hospital the vampire (quite unpleasant person) asked how long I had been fasting. When I said I had not I was told you had to do so for an HbA1c. Is this correct - I have never heard of this before. By the time I managed to get back (fasting) another four days had passed so nearly three weeks will pass between the request and the result. Has anybody got the definitve answer? Reply #1 on: 29 April 2012, 10:58:37 AM If it is only hba1c then you don't need to fast. Usually you are having other tests done at the same time as hba1c, eg cholesterol, which does require fasting to be accurate. I usually just fast anyway. The vampire is wrong in saying you have to fast for a hba1c, but depending what other tests are being done you may have to fast. If fasting doesnt cause you any problems then just make an early appt and fast that morning tends to be my approach. Reply #2 on: 29 April 2012, 11:12:30 AM There was no cholesterol test just HbA1c, FBC and one for thyroid function. I hate fasting as my BGs tend to go haywire after (Type 1). Reply #3 on: 29 April 2012, 12:39:21 PM I've been definitively told by my surgery that I don't have to fast for Hba1c and they're also happy to do non-fasting chol. Fasting is difficult for T1 I agree, though my BGs just continue to rise if I don't have breakfast/inject but I've found injecting 2 - 3 u (depending where it is at the time - I wouldn't do 3u if I was under Type 1. Mis-diagnosed T2 May 2003, finally had CPeptide test 15/7/11 and proper diagnosis 1/9/11. Now pumping Apidra wi Continue reading >>

Accuracy Of Fasting Plasma Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Testing For The Early Detection Of Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Accuracy Of Fasting Plasma Glucose And Hemoglobin A1c Testing For The Early Detection Of Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Abstract Diabetes, often referred as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic disorders characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia with disturbances of fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism because of the defects in insulin releasing, insulin action, or both. The most common form of diabetes mellitus is type 2 diabetes which is a worldwide chronic disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing for the early detection of diabetes and to evaluate the correlation between FPG and HbA1c as a biomarker for diabetes in the general population in Hong Kong. This study also observed and assessed the risk of diabetes by comparing different genders and ages in Hong Kong. A retrospective study was undertaken and the data was collected in the database of a HOKLAS (The Hong Kong Laboratory Accreditation Scheme) clinical laboratory from 200 diabetic and non-diabetic patients (83 females and 117 males, age ranged from 20 to 90) who attended the laboratory during January 2016 to February 2016 for both FPG and HbA1c measurements. A significant correlation between HbA1c and FPG (r2 = 0.713, p < 0.05) was observed in this study. Moreover, patients detected as diabetes in age groups 45–64, 65–74 and ≥75 years old were 2.5, 3 and 6 times respectively higher than that of the diabetic individuals under 45 years old. In conclusion, FPG was significantly correlated with HbA1c and a significant increase in FPG and HbA1c in male was observed by comparing with female. Furthermore, the incidence rate of diabetes mellitus in male was 3 times higher than that in female in Hong Kong and it progressed with increasing age. Further longer term and large scale research in each age group is warranted. Continue reading >>

Postprandial Blood Glucose Outweighs Fasting Blood Glucose And Hba1c In Screening Coronary Heart Disease

Postprandial Blood Glucose Outweighs Fasting Blood Glucose And Hba1c In Screening Coronary Heart Disease

The objective of the present study is to assess the performance of fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial blood glucose (PBG), and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as screening for coronary heart disease (CHD) in an inpatient population undergoing coronary angiography. 1852 consecutive patients scheduled for coronary angiography were classified into Normal Glucose Tolerance (NGT), Impaired Glucose Regulation (IGR), and diabetes, based on FBG, PBG, and HbA1c. Correlations of Gensini score with glucose metabolism and insulin resistance were analyzed. The associations between glycemic variables and Gensini score or the presence of CHD were analyzed by multiple linear regression and logistic regression, respectively. CHD was diagnosed in 488, 622, and 414 patients with NGT, IGR, and diabetes, respectively. Gensini score was positively correlated with FBG (r = 0.09, p < 0.01), PBG (r = 0.20, p < 0.01), and HbA1c (r = 0.19, p < 0.01). Gensini score was not correlated with fasting insulin (r = −0.081, p = 0.36), post-prandial insulin (r = −0.02, p = 0.61), or HOMAIR (r = −0.0059, p = 0.13). When FBG, PBG and HbA1c were pooled altogether, only PBG persisted in its association with Gensini score and the prevalence of CHD. The severity of CHD was associated with glucose rather than insulin resistance in this Chinese population. PBG was optimally correlated with the presence and severity of CHD. Diabetes has already become a major public health problem in China. According to the recent 2013 national survey, the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes in China was 10.9% and 35.7%, respectively1. Current diagnostic cutoff points for diabetes are based on the correlations of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) and Postprandial Blood Glucose ( Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

A Comparison Of Hba1c And Fasting Blood Sugar Tests In General Population

Go to: Abstract Objectives: Early diagnosis of diabetes is crucially important in reduction of the complications. Although HbA1c is an accurate marker for the prediction of complications, less information is available about its accuracy in diagnosis of diabetes. In this study, the association between HbA1c and FBS was assessed through a cross-sectional population-based study. Methods: A random sample of population in Kerman city was selected. The total number was 604 people. Their HbA1c and fasting blood sugar (FBS) were tested. The association between HbA1c and FBS and also their sensitivity, specificity and predictive values in detection of abnormal values of each other were determined. The association of HbA1c with FBS was relatively strong particularly in diabetic subjects. Generally, FBS was a more accurate predictor for HbA1c compared with HbA1c as a predictor of FBS. Although the optimum cutoff point of HbA1c was >6.15%, its precision was comparable with the conventional cutoff point of >6%. Conclusions: In conclusion, FBS sounds more reliable to separate diabetic from non-diabetic subjects than HbA1c. In case of being interested in using HbA1c in screening, the conventional cutoff points of 6% is an acceptable threshold for discrimination of diabetics from non-diabetics. Keywords: HbA1c, Blood glucose, Diabetics *The adjusted values were computed in a multivariable regression model with sex, BMI and age as independent variables. Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

All About The Hemoglobin A1c Test

All About The Hemoglobin A1c Test

People with diabetes used to depend only on urine tests or daily finger sticks to measure their blood sugars. These tests are accurate, but only in the moment. As an overall measurement of blood sugar control, they’re very limited. This is because blood sugar can vary wildly depending on the time of day, activity levels, and even hormone changes. Some people may have high blood sugars at 3 a.m. and be totally unaware of it. Once A1C tests became available in the 1980s, they became an important tool in controlling diabetes. A1C tests measure average blood glucose over the past two to three months. So even if you have a high fasting blood sugar, your overall blood sugars may be normal, or vice versa. A normal fasting blood sugar may not eliminate the possibility of type 2 diabetes. This is why A1C tests are now being used for diagnosis and screening of prediabetes. Because it doesn’t require fasting, the test can be given as part of an overall blood screening. The A1C test is also known as the hemoglobin A1C test or HbA1C test. Other alternate names include the glycosylated hemoglobin test, glycohemoglobin test, and glycated hemoglobin test. A1C measures the amount of hemoglobin in the blood that has glucose attached to it. Hemoglobin is a protein found inside red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body. Hemoglobin cells are constantly dying and regenerating, but they have a lifespan of approximately three months. Glucose attaches, or glycates, to hemoglobin, so the record of how much glucose is attached to your hemoglobin also lasts for about three months. If there’s too much glucose attached to the hemoglobin cells, you’ll have a high A1C. If the amount of glucose is normal, your A1C will be normal. The test is effective because of the lifespan of the hemogl Continue reading >>

Discordance In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes: Comparison Between Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose

Discordance In The Diagnosis Of Diabetes: Comparison Between Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose

Abstract HbA1c has been introduced as a complementary diagnostic test for diabetes, but its impact on disease prevalence is unknown. This study evaluated the concordance between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in the diagnosis of diabetes in the general population. Materials and methods The study was designed as a population based investigation, with participants being sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Blood samples were collected after overnight fasting and analyzed within 4 hours after collection. HbA1c was measured with high pressure liquid chromatography (Arkray Adams, Japan). FPG was measured by the hexokinase method (Advia Autoanalyzer; Bayer Diagnostics, Germany). Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L. Prediabetes was classified as HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. The study included 3523 individuals (2356 women) aged 30 years and above. Based on the HbA1c test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 9.7% (95%CI, 8.7–10.7%; n = 342) and 34.6% (33.0–36.2; n = 1219), respectively. Based on the FPG test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 6.3% (95%CI, 5.5–7.2%; n = 223) and 12.1% (11.1–13.2; n = 427). Among the 427 individuals identified by FPG as "pre-diabetes", 28.6% were classified as diabetes by HbA1c test. The weighted kappa statistic of concordance between HbA1c and FPG was 0.55, with most of the discordance being in the prediabetes group. These data indicate that there is a significant discordance in the diagnosis of diabetes between FPG and HbA1c measurements, and the discordance could have significant impact on clinical practice. FPG appears to underestimate the burden of undiagnosed diabetes. Figures Citation: Ho-Pham LT, Nguyen UDT, Tran TX, Nguyen TV (2017) Discordance in the diagnosis of dia Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Hba1c, Not Fasting Morning Blood Sugar

Hba1c, Not Fasting Morning Blood Sugar

Doctors used to use your fasting morning blood sugar level as a guide to managing diabetes. Now they depend far more on a test called Hemoglobin A1C, or HBA1C. Eating raises blood sugar levels. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to the surface of cells where it cannot be removed. The sugar is converted to a poison called sorbitol that damages the cell to cause heart attacks, kidney damage, blindness and other nerve damage. Your fasting morning blood sugar level doesn't tell you if you are getting cell damage, but the Hemoglobin A1C test actually measures how much sugar sticks to cells. Once you start treatment, your doctor should check you once a month to measure your HBA1C. If it is high, you should change your diet and or your doctor should change your medication. When the HBA1C is normal, you are doing everything right. See my reports on Who is Pre-Diabetic? Treatment of Insulin Resistance Dietary Treatment of Diabetes HWM Breuer. The postprandial blood glucose level - A new target for optimizing treatment of diabetes mellitus. European Heart Journal Supplements, 2000, Vol 2, Iss D, pp D36-D38. Checked 12/2/15 Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c)

Hemoglobin A1c, often abbreviated HbA1c, is a form of hemoglobin (a blood pigment that carries oxygen) that is bound to glucose. The blood test for HbA1c level is routinely performed in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Blood HbA1c levels are reflective of how well diabetes is controlled. The normal range for level for hemoglobin A1c is less than 6%. HbA1c also is known as glycosylated, or glycated hemoglobin. HbA1c levels are reflective of blood glucose levels over the past six to eight weeks and do not reflect daily ups and downs of blood glucose. High HbA1c levels indicate poorer control of diabetes than levels in the normal range. HbA1c is typically measured to determine how well a type 1 or type 2 diabetes treatment plan (including medications, exercise, or dietary changes) is working. How Is Hemoglobin A1c Measured? The test for hemoglobin A1c depends on the chemical (electrical) charge on the molecule of HbA1c, which differs from the charges on the other components of hemoglobin. The molecule of HbA1c also differs in size from the other components. HbA1c may be separated by charge and size from the other hemoglobin A components in blood by a procedure called high pressure (or performance) liquid chromatography (HPLC). HPLC separates mixtures (for example, blood) into its various components by adding the mixtures to special liquids and passing them under pressure through columns filled with a material that separates the mixture into its different component molecules. HbA1c testing is done on a blood sample. Because HbA1c is not affected by short-term fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations, for example, due to meals, blood can be drawn for HbA1c testing without regard to when food was eaten. Fasting for the blood test is not necessary. What Are Continue reading >>

Guide To Hba1c

Guide To Hba1c

Tweet HbA1c is a term commonly used in relation to diabetes. This guide explains what HbA1c is, how it differs from blood glucose levels and how it's used for diagnosing diabetes. What is HbA1c? The term HbA1c refers to glycated haemoglobin. It develops when haemoglobin, a protein within red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body, joins with glucose in the blood, becoming 'glycated'. By measuring glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), clinicians are able to get an overall picture of what our average blood sugar levels have been over a period of weeks/months. For people with diabetes this is important as the higher the HbA1c, the greater the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. HbA1c is also referred to as haemoglobin A1c or simply A1c. HbA1c refers to glycated haemoglobin (A1c), which identifies average plasma glucose concentration. How does HBA1c return an accurate average measurement of average blood glucose? When the body processes sugar, glucose in the bloodstream naturally attaches to haemoglobin. The amount of glucose that combines with this protein is directly proportional to the total amount of sugar that is in your system at that time. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why peop Continue reading >>

Performance Of Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose In Screening For Diabetes In Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

Performance Of Hba1c And Fasting Plasma Glucose In Screening For Diabetes In Patients Undergoing Coronary Angiography

OBJECTIVE The performance of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was compared in screening for diabetes by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients without known diabetes admitted for CAG were eligible. OGTT and HbA1c were assessed 2–4 weeks after hospital discharge. The performance of HbA1c and FPG was evaluated by using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. RESULTS Diabetes was diagnosed in 83 of 400 patients (20.8%). The area under the ROC curve was higher for FPG than for HbA1c (0.81 vs. 0.73, P = 0.032). We proposed a screening algorithm and validated it in another 170 patients. Overall, this algorithm reduced the number of OGTTs by 71.4% (sensitivity 74.4%, specificity 100%). CONCLUSIONS FPG performed better than HbA1c in screening for diabetes in patients undergoing CAG. A screening algorithm might help to reduce the number of OGTTs. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is recommended for abnormal glucose regulation screening in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (1). However, OGTT is not satisfactory as a routine test (2,3). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) has been adopted as a diagnostic criterion for diabetes (4), and HbA1c testing has some advantages, such as requiring nonfasting samples and having less biological variability (3). On the other hand, the fasting plasma glucose (FPG) test is widely available and inexpensive (3). The performance of HbA1c and FPG in screening for diabetes has only been reported in a limited number of patients with acute coronary disease (5,6). Doerr et al. (7) reported that the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥6.5% for the detection of newly diagnosed diabetes (NDD) in patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG Continue reading >>

What Do Hba1c Of 8 And Fasting Glucose Of 140 Signify?

What Do Hba1c Of 8 And Fasting Glucose Of 140 Signify?

Sometimes exercise and diet alone can control diabetes but most of the time, medicine is necessary and unlikely that it will reverse. You may have to live with diabetes for the rest of life. I think you should start Metformin 850 mg once with dinner from today only. Consult your specialist doctor, discuss with him or her and with their consent take the medicines. For more information consult an internal medicine physician online --> My father and grandfather both have diabetes and they are healthy at 85. But this microalbumin to creatinine ratio at 116 level in the blood is something that I am not able to understand. I only understand that the kidneys are not working fine. Is it true? I hope my kidneys are fine. My Kidney function tests are normal except high uric acid. I hope there is nothing serious? Can this also be reversed with diet and medicine. It is reversible with ACE (angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor) inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin II receptor blockers). For more information consult an internal medicine physician online --> I checked my reports from last year. My HbA1c was 6.4 and even 20 days back it was 6.9. I do not know how it increased to 8 in just 20 days. Can this be reversed by any chance? Also, my sugar is 140 in the morning and in the evening after six hours of not eating it becomes 105. I fail to understand the reason. Continue reading >>

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