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Hba1c 8 Means

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Convert Hba1c To Average Blood Sugar Level

Tweet Use this calculator to convert HbA1c to Average Blood Sugar Level. The HbA1c level in your blood indicates what your average blood glucose level has been in the past 2 to 3 months. Everyone, whether non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, type 1 diabetic or type 2 diabetic has some degree of sugar in their blood. To convert between mg/dl and mmol/L, use our blood sugar converter. You can then convert average blood glucose levels back to HbA1c units with the calculator below. mmol/L Recommended HbA1c ranges The recommended HbA1c range for most with diabetes is to keep the value under 48 mmols/mol (under 6.5% in the old percentage units). People at risk of hypoglycemia, or for whom such tight blood glucose regulation is not advised, may be advised to keep their HbA1c below 59 mmols/mol (under 7.5% in the old percentage units). Because the two tests measure two different things, the calculator can only give an estimate and therefore there will always be some discrepancy between the value provided by the calculator and actual lab test results. How accurate are the results? The calculator looks to provide an estimate of what your HbA1c value may be based upon your average blood glucose results and vice versa. It’s important to note that HbA1c and blood glucose tests measure different things. Blood glucose tests measure the concentration of glucose molecules in the blood at a single point in time. The HbA1c test measures the proportion of haemoglobin molecules in the blood that have become chemically bonded with glucose over a period of up to 3 months. However, the calculator serves as a useful guide which can give you a close indication of what your HbA1c result might be based on your blood glucose results? What can I learn from converting my average blood glucose level to HbA1c Continue reading >>

Staying Healthy With Diabetes Includes A1c (hba1c) Testing

Staying Healthy With Diabetes Includes A1c (hba1c) Testing

Sure, you test your glucose level several times a day. You’re aware of diet and exercise issues and do your best to stay on track — staying healthy with diabetes. But what about your hemoglobin A1c level? What does it mean and why is it so important? The hemoglobin A1c test is a simple lab test that shows the average amount of sugar in your blood over the last two to three months. It’s the best way to find out if your blood sugar is under control. All people with type 2 diabetes should have a hemoglobin A1c test at least twice a year. If your treatment changes or if your blood sugar level stays too high, you should get a hemoglobin A1c test at least every three months until your blood sugar level improves. Regular testing will help you and your doctor to track your blood sugar levels over time and plan long-term treatment options to reach your target level of control. Red blood cells are continually dying and being replaced, so at any given time they have a range of ages in your body. In a sense, your blood tells the history of your glucose level over the last few months. For example, if your levels were not in control three weeks ago, glycated hemoglobin will persist in the blood cells that were active at that time. If your blood sugar tends to go up at night, when you are less likely to self-monitor, your HbA1c test will indicate a higher average level of blood sugar than you found through self-monitoring. A good hemoglobin A1c reading for people with type 2 diabetes is less than 7%. You can do a lot to bring down a high blood sugar level and get it under control. Start by asking your healthcare provider for a hemoglobin A1c t est. If your hemoglobin A1c test result is too high, talk to your healthcare provider about how to lower it. Keep your goal in sight, but Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

H-b-a-1-c

H-b-a-1-c

(What It Is and Why It Matters) You’ve pulled out your logbook and are taking off your jacket to bare your upper arm for the blood pressure cuff, when the nurse walks in and asks you to hold out a finger. “Does it matter that I had breakfast this morning?” you ask, trying to remember if you were supposed to fast before coming in, as she pricks your finger and collects a blood sample. “No, it doesn’t,” she says. “There; all done. The doctor will be in shortly to discuss your result.” And, indeed, several minutes later, your doctor walks in and says with a smile, “Looks like things are coming together for you. You’re at 6.8%.” For some people, the doctor’s words would be enough for them to realize that the fingerstick in the imaginary scenario above was for a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test. What is Hba1c? The HbA1c test gives an indication of your blood glucose control over the previous 2–3 months and is an important part of your diabetes-care regimen. This article discusses what the test is, why it’s important, and how it’s used to help better blood glucose control. What is HbA1c? The ABCs Figuring out how the HbA1c test can help with your blood glucose control starts with understanding a bit about the test and what it measures. Hemoglobin. Hemoglobin is a molecule found in great quantities in each of the body’s red blood cells. As red blood cells travel through the circulatory system, the hemoglobin molecules join with oxygen from the lungs for delivery to the peripheral tissues, where they exchange it for some of the carbon dioxide destined for release to the lungs. The hemoglobin molecule is made up of two pairs of protein chains (two alpha chains and two beta chains) and four heme groups (iron-containing structures that act as th Continue reading >>

What Is Hba1c And A Normal Hba1c Range? Explained In Plain English

What Is Hba1c And A Normal Hba1c Range? Explained In Plain English

Those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes may have seen it before, but what is a normal HbA1c range? This article explores what your HbA1c reading should be and how you can improve it. What is HbA1c (Hemoglobin A1c)? HbA1c is a marker that can determine your average blood sugar (glucose) levels over the previous 3-months (1). That means it can be used to assess the quality of your diabetes management, as well as to diagnose pre-diabetes and diabetes. Sometimes HbA1c is also called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c or just A1c. The ‘Hb’ refers to hemoglobin, a part of red blood cells that carry oxygen throughout your body. ‘A1c’ refers to a minor part of hemoglobin that sugar molecules attach to. The amount of sugar attached is directly proportional to the amount of sugar in your blood at a given time, so this reading is used to accurately reflect average blood sugar levels. If you’ve had high blood sugar levels in the past month or so, your HbA1c levels will be higher too. Summary: HbA1c is a marker that reflects your average blood sugar levels in the previous 3 months. It’s also called glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c or just A1c. Normal HbA1c Range The HbA1c test is measured as either a percentage or in mmol/mol. Below I’ve listed what is considered a normal HbA1c range, and what values would be considered outside of normal (pre-diabetic or diabetic): HbA1c range for normal (non-diabetic) adults: Below 6.0%, or below 42 mmol/mol HbA1c range for pre-diabetes: 6.0% to 6.4%, or 42 to 47 mmol/mol HbA1c range for diabetes: 6.5% or above, or 48 mmol/mol or above. Target ranges are also shown below in this table: HbA1c % mmol/mol Normal Below 6.0% Below 42 mmol/mol Pre-diabetes 6.0% to 6.4% 42 to 47 mmol/mol Diabetes 6.5% or above 48 mmol/mol or above Normal Hb Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

Hba1c Is 8.6 Is This Bad?

Hba1c Is 8.6 Is This Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community My HBA1C is 8.5 how bad is this reading and how can I reduce it keeping my energy levels high. I work long hours in Saudi and preparing foods is sometimes hard and I seem to go for quick fixes like Alpen bars, peanut butter and jam sandwichs at night biscuits with my cuppa! I have other health issues which effect my sugar so how do I know if the Metformin is working along with the glicicide? I keep reading cut out all my current carbs keep with fats and protein how true is this? @Dadio carbs convert in our bodies to sugar, and as a T2D it is this sugar our bodies can no longer deal with efficiently. So, yes, if you and less fuel (sugar) to the fire, the fire (Blood Sugars) will die down a bit novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member I would say the 8.9 is on the high end of the scale of "room for improvement"..... cutting carbs is the first line of defense until you build up a knowledge of your own personal carb tolerances... the metformin only compliments you own insulin response I think....so getting the carb down will help and then you can begin testing the foods you like to eat before deciding yay or nay.. Your HbA1c of 8.9 is equivalent to an average of 11.6mmol/l . This means your blood glucose is running high much of the time and may be causing you damage. The UK guidelines say we shouldn't go above 8.5mmol/l at any time, so you are well above that. You are also on Gliclazide, so your levels should be a lot lower than they are. It's your choice, but if you don't reduce your snacking and cut those carbs your levels won't come down. Instead of sandwiches for snacks, try cheese, boiled eggs, tomatoes, cold meats, nuts, salads. Do you test your own Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Hba1c And Estimated Average Glucose (eag)

Why is relating HbA1c to glucose important? We are frequently asked about the relationship between HbA1c and plasma glucose levels. Many patients with diabetes mellitus now perform self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in the home setting, and understanding the relationship between HbA1c and glucose can be useful in setting goals for day-to-day testing. HbA1c: A "Weighted" Average Many studies have shown that HbA1c is an index of average glucose (AG) over the preceding weeks-to-months. Erythrocyte (red blood cell) life-span averages about 120 days. The level of HbA1c at any point in time is contributed to by all circulating erythrocytes, from the oldest (120 days old) to the youngest. However, HbA1c is a "weighted" average of blood glucose levels during the preceding 120 days, meaning that glucose levels in the preceding 30 days contribute substantially more to the level of HbA1c than do glucose levels 90-120 days earlier. This explains why the level of HbA1c can increase or decrease relatively quickly with large changes in glucose; it does not take 120 days to detect a clinically meaningful change in HbA1c following a clinically significant change in AG. How does HbA1c relate to average glucose (AG)? In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial or DCCT (New Engl J Med 1993;329:977-986) study of patients with Type 1 diabetes, quarterly HbA1c determinations were the principal measure of glycemic control; study subjects also performed quarterly 24-hour, 7-point capillary-blood glucose profiles. Blood specimens were obtained by subjects in the home setting, pre-meal, 90 minutes post-meal, and at bed-time. In an analysis of the DCCT glucose profile data (Diabetes Care 25:275-278, 2002), mean HbA1c and AG were calculated for each study subject (n= 1439). Results showed Continue reading >>

Hba1c Below 8% In Diabetes For 'most' Says Acp, But Others Disagree

Hba1c Below 8% In Diabetes For 'most' Says Acp, But Others Disagree

HbA1c Below 8% in Diabetes for 'Most' Says ACP, But Others Disagree UPDATEDMarch 6, 2018//In new guidance, the American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends a target HbA1c of 7% to 8% for most nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. "ACP's analysis of the evidence behind existing guidelines found that treatment with drugs to targets of 7% or less, compared with targets of about 8%, did not reduce deaths or macrovascular complications, such as heart attack or stroke, but did result in substantial harms, said Jack Ende, MD, ACP president, in a statement. "For most people with type 2 diabetes, achieving an HbA1c between 7% and 8% will best balance long-term benefits with harms such as low blood sugar, medication burden, and costs, he added. But experts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) contacted by Medscape Medical News take issue with these higher glycemic control targets, which they argue don't consider, for example, the cardiovascular disease (CVD) benefits of newer therapies which often lower HbA1c levels. The new ACP guidance could therefore cause confusion for internists and primary care physicians, who may not know whether to follow the new guidance or stick with the advice from the ADA and AACE. But Timothy J Wilt, MD, MPH, who coauthored the ACP statement, noted, "Importantly, HbA1c target recommendations from other guideline groups also did not include information about these newer drugs which have been mainly studied in higher risk [those with, or at high risk of, CVD] individuals." "ACP's guidance statement reviewed evidence and guideline recommendations related to HbA1c treatment targets and did not specifically address newer diabetes drugs that may have benefits and harms beyond the s Continue reading >>

What Is The Hba1c?

What Is The Hba1c?

In the blood stream are the red blood cells, which are made of a molecule, haemoglobin. Glucose sticks to the haemoglobin to make a 'glycosylated haemoglobin' molecule, called haemoglobin A1C or HbA1C. The more glucose in the blood, the more haemoglobin A1C or HbA1C will be present in the blood. Red cells live for 8 - 12 weeks before they are replaced. By measuring the HbA1C it can tell you how high your blood glucose has been on average over the last 8-12 weeks. A normal non-diabetic HbA1C is <36mmol/mol (5.5%). In diabetes about 48mmol/mol (6.5%) is good. The HbA1C test is currently one of the best ways to check diabetes is under control; it is the blood test that gets sent to the laboratory, and it is done on the spot in some hospital clinics. Remember, the HbA1C is not the same as the glucose level. Coincidentally the glucose/HbA1C numbers for good control are rather similar though in the UK and Europe: glucose levels averaging 6.5 mmols/l before meals is equivalent to 60mmol/mol (7%). HbA1C (glucose levels are higher after meals) (see below). Two examples Below are two examples of people who have their HbA1c measured. One is poorly controlled, one well controlled. When should the HbA1C be measured? Measure HbA1c every 3 months if trying to improve every 6 months if very stable If your diabetes is controlled (basically an HbA1C lower than 53mmol/mol ( 7% ), every 3-6 months. But if the last reading is above 53mmol/mol (7%) and you are in reasonable health, you will need to achieve a lower level if possible, and the next reading should be sooner. This assumes you will make changes to improve your control. There is no point in having your HbA1c measured if you are not trying to achieve good control of your diabetes, although the level does predict the likelihood of co Continue reading >>

What Is An Hba1c? What’s A Good Number?

What Is An Hba1c? What’s A Good Number?

If you have diabetes, you should be tracking your HbA1c. It’s the best measure that we have of your average blood sugars over the last three months. But what is an HbA1c?! Hemoglobin is the stuff that carries oxygen in your blood and gives it that red color. When you have extra sugar in your blood, some of it attaches to the homoglobin and forms a variant called hemoglobin A1c. It’s also called “glycated hemoglobin” – or HbA1c for short. Hemoglobin and its variations live for about 120 days. By measuring the percentage of HbA1c in your blood, we can tell about how high your blood sugars have been during that lifespan. How is an HbA1c test performed? The HbA1c test is done by drawing blood from a vein. You may feel a slight pinch when the needle in inserted. Blood can be sent away to a lab or measured on a machine in your doctor’s office or at a hospital. There are home HbA1c test kits available that cost about $15 per test. The home tests are less accurate but can give you a strong estimate. What is a normal HbA1c? In people without diabetes, the HbA1c is usually between 4% and 6%. From the Wikipedia page on glycated hemoglobin, here’s a chart showing how your HbA1c compares to your estimated average blood glucose during the prior months: HbA1c eAG (estimated average glucose) (%) (mmol/mol) (mmol/L) (mg/dL) 5 31 5.4 (4.2–6.7) 97 (76–120) 6 42 7.0 (5.5–8.5) 126 (100–152) 7 53 8.6 (6.8–10.3) 154 (123–185) 8 64 10.2 (8.1–12.1) 183 (147–217) 9 75 11.8 (9.4–13.9) 212 (170–249) 10 86 13.4 (10.7–15.7) 240 (193–282) 11 97 14.9 (12.0–17.5) 269 (217–314) 12 108 16.5 (13.3–19.3) 298 (240–347 What is a good HbA1c? Below are the 2011 guidelines for the major American standards bodies: The guidelines are based in part on the two largest s Continue reading >>

Guide To Hba1c

Guide To Hba1c

Tweet HbA1c is a term commonly used in relation to diabetes. This guide explains what HbA1c is, how it differs from blood glucose levels and how it's used for diagnosing diabetes. What is HbA1c? The term HbA1c refers to glycated haemoglobin. It develops when haemoglobin, a protein within red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout your body, joins with glucose in the blood, becoming 'glycated'. By measuring glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), clinicians are able to get an overall picture of what our average blood sugar levels have been over a period of weeks/months. For people with diabetes this is important as the higher the HbA1c, the greater the risk of developing diabetes-related complications. HbA1c is also referred to as haemoglobin A1c or simply A1c. HbA1c refers to glycated haemoglobin (A1c), which identifies average plasma glucose concentration. How does HBA1c return an accurate average measurement of average blood glucose? When the body processes sugar, glucose in the bloodstream naturally attaches to haemoglobin. The amount of glucose that combines with this protein is directly proportional to the total amount of sugar that is in your system at that time. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why peop Continue reading >>

Diabetes Calculators

Diabetes Calculators

HbA1c (%) Estimated Average (eAG) (mg/dL) Estimated Average (eAG) (mmol/l) 5 97 5.4 6 126 7.0 7 154 8.6 8 183 10.2 9 212 11.8 10 240 13.4 11 269 14.9 12 298 16.5 You can use the calculators on this page to convert HbA1c and estimated average blood sugars. You can also convert from mg/dL, the measurements used in the USA, and mmol which is used by most of the rest of the world. Convert Blood Sugar from US (mg/dl) to UK (mmol/L) The difference is that mg/dL is a measure of weight while mmol is a measure of volume. US: UK: (click on other box to calculate) Formulas US (mg/dl) is the UK (mmol/L) number multiplied by 18. UK (mmol/L) is the US (mg/dl) number divided by 18. Convert HbA1c to Average Blood Glucose Reading Enter HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin): % Avg. plasma blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Avg. whole blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Formulas Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mg/dl) = (HbA1c * 35.6) - 77.3 Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mmol/L) = (HbA1c * 1.98) - 4.29 Avg. whole blood glucose = Plasma Blood Glucose / 1.12 Continue reading >>

A1c Test

A1c Test

Print Overview The A1C test is a common blood test used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and then to gauge how well you're managing your diabetes. The A1C test goes by many other names, including glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. The A1C test result reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications. Why it's done An international committee of experts from the American Diabetes Association, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the International Diabetes Federation, recommend that the A1C test be the primary test used to diagnose prediabetes, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. After a diabetes diagnosis, the A1C test is used to monitor your diabetes treatment plan. Since the A1C test measures your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months instead of your blood sugar level at a specific point in time, it is a better reflection of how well your diabetes treatment plan is working overall. Your doctor will likely use the A1C test when you're first diagnosed with diabetes. This also helps establish a baseline A1C level. The test may then need to be repeated while you're learning to control your blood sugar. Later, how often you need the A1C test depends on the type of diabetes you have, your treatment plan and how well you're managing your blood sugar. For example, the A1C test may be recommended: Once every year if you have prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes Twice a year if Continue reading >>

Test Id: Hba1c Hemoglobin A1c, Blood

Test Id: Hba1c Hemoglobin A1c, Blood

Evaluating the long-term control of blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients Diagnosing diabetes Identifying patients at increased risk for diabetes (prediabetes) Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder associated with disturbances in carbohydrate, fat, and protein metabolism characterized by hyperglycemia. It is one of the most prevalent diseases, affecting approximately 24 million individuals in the United States. Long-term treatment of the disease emphasizes control of blood glucose levels to prevent the acute complications of ketosis and hyperglycemia. In addition, long-term complications such as retinopathy, neuropathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular disease can be minimized if blood glucose levels are effectively controlled. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a result of the nonenzymatic attachment of a hexose molecule to the N-terminal amino acid of the hemoglobin molecule. The attachment of the hexose molecule occurs continually over the entire life span of the erythrocyte and is dependent on blood glucose concentration and the duration of exposure of the erythrocyte to blood glucose. Therefore, the HbA1c level reflects the mean glucose concentration over the previous period (approximately 8-12 weeks, depending on the individual) and provides a much better indication of long-term glycemic control than blood and urinary glucose determinations. Diabetic patients with very high blood concentrations of glucose have from 2 to 3 times more HbA1c than normal individuals. Diagnosis of diabetes includes 1 of the following: -Fasting plasma glucose > or =126 mg/dL -Symptoms of hyperglycemia and random plasma glucose >or =200 mg/dL -Two-hour glucose > or =200 mg/dL during oral glucose tolerance test unless there is unequivocal hyperglycemia, confirmatory testing should be Continue reading >>

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