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Hba1c 5.2

Hba1c Conversion Chart

Hba1c Conversion Chart

The HbA1c test measures how much haemoglobin in the blood has become glycated (chemically bonded with glucose). ••••• HbA1c values have changed and are now reported as a measurement in mmols/mol instead of the percentage previously given. To make sense of the new units and compare these with old units and vice versa, use our HbA1c units converter table below. Old unit = NGSP unit = %HbA1c New unit = IFCC unit = mmol/mol HbA1c Old HbA1c New HbA1c Old HbA1c New 4.0 20 8.1 65 4.1 21 8.2 66 4.2 22 8.3 67 4.3 23 8.4 68 4.4 25 8.5 69 4.5 26 8.6 70 4.6 27 8.7 72 4.7 28 8.8 73 4.8 29 8.9 74 4.9 30 9.0 75 5.0 31 9.1 76 5.1 32 9.2 77 5.2 33 9.3 78 5.3 34 9.4 79 5.4 36 9.5 80 5.5 37 9.6 81 5.6 38 9.7 83 5.7 39 9.8 84 5.8 40 9.9 85 5.9 41 10 86 6.0 42 10.1 87 6.1 43 10.2 88 6.2 44 10.3 89 6.3 45 10.4 90 6.4 46 10.5 91 6.5 48 10.6 92 6.6 49 10.7 93 6.7 50 10.8 95 6.8 51 10.9 96 6.9 52 11.0 97 7.0 53 11.1 98 7.1 54 11.2 99 7.2 55 11.3 100 7.3 56 11.4 101 7.4 57 11.5 102 7.5 58 11.6 103 7.6 60 11.7 104 7.7 61 11.8 105 7.8 62 11.9 107 7.9 63 12.0 108 8.0 64 Sit down with your child to decide what kind of meter they would prefer out of the options available. Hypos Hypos occur when your blood glucose falls too low. PLAY A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for anyone else. Find out what… Living with diabetes during pregnancy can be challenging, but you can still lead a healthy life. Take control of your… Glucose testing is the process used to measure the amount of glucose in your blood and can be carried out… FreeStyle Optium Neo has a choice of tools designed to help people who use insulin. Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team… Continue reading >>

Haemoglobin A1c Cut-off Point To Identify A High Risk Group Of Future Diabetes: Results From The Omiya Ma Cohort Study

Haemoglobin A1c Cut-off Point To Identify A High Risk Group Of Future Diabetes: Results From The Omiya Ma Cohort Study

Haemoglobin A1c cut-off point to identify a high risk group of future diabetes: results from the Omiya MA Cohort Study M Kato ,1 M Noda ,2 H Suga ,3 T Nakamura ,3 M Matsumoto ,3 and Y Kanazawa 4 1Japan Foundation for the Promotion of International Medical Research Cooperation, Miyahara-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 2Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, and Diabetes Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Miyahara-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 3Omiya Medical Association, Miyahara-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 4Japan Diabetes Foundation, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, Japan 2Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, and Diabetes Research Center, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Miyahara-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama Correspondence to: M. Noda, Department of Diabetes and Metabolic Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan. E-mail: [email protected] Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Terms and Conditions set out at Copyright 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine 2012 Diabetes UK Re-use of this article is permitted in accordance with the Creative Commons Deed, Attribution 2.5, which does not permit commercial exploitation. Using the HbA1c level to define diabetes has several advantages and these advantages also apply to define a high-risk group. However, the risk of diabetes increases as HbA1c increases and a certain degree of arbitrariness in the cut-off for the high risk group is unavoidable. The aim of this study was to determine the HbA1c cut-off for defining a high-risk group that corresponds to the fasting plasma glucose cut-off by comparing the risk of diabetes against the fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c lev Continue reading >>

Question About Glyco Hgb/a1c Test

Question About Glyco Hgb/a1c Test

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Hi~ I have a question about my blood test. I'm not sure what the results actually mean My doctor ordered another test for HgbA1c in 6 months, with no restrictions to my diet or life style. Should I be concerned? Maybe I didn't go about this right, cause no one even looked at my question. I had an ablation on my heart to correct atrial fibrillation...a year ago on September 16, 2007. The procedure, so far, has been a complete success. I'm almost afraid to say it.... After recovering from that, I started walking again...about 2 1/2 miles a day. I'm concerned about the recent test results for Glyco HGB/A1C of 5.2, since my mother had diabetes. I'm a little overweight for my size. I'm 5'4" and weigh 145 lbs. I'm working on losing 20 pounds.....wish me luck! I'm hoping the walking will help. Should I be concerned about the test results? I dont have that nagging thirst that everyone talks about......but I do get up once in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. Ok...I dont want to make this my life history.. If someone could just answer my question.....I'd be so grateful. I've been worrying about this all day. **{{hugs}} thank you SO much....Chris, jillrapp, Gordonm, CookD, shutterbug, I appreciate your replies more than you can ever know!! But, I have a question...What is a pre-diabetic? ...I was fasting when I had the blood workup done. I had a cbc, chem 14 as well as thyroid blood work done that day. I just dont understand why he wanted just that one blood test done again in a few months. He didn't send a script for anything else...just that. He stated that he wanted me to follow up on thi Continue reading >>

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

Translating A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

In the USA, doctors recommend that you have your Hemoglobin A1c measured at least twice per year. This simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. The higher your blood sugar levels are, the more AGEs are present. AGEs are also responsible for the development of complications such as retinopathy and neuropathy, because that accumulation will build and irritate crucial nerve-endings. Now, let’s get back to your A1C: To help people with diabetes understanding their A1C in real day-to-day terms, the medical world has developed the “eAG” measurement. Estimated Average Glucose. Your eAG will give your A1C reading in a blood sugar level of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) just like you’re used to seeing on your glucose meter. The American Diabetes Association has this easy calculator, allowing you to enter and translate your latest A1C to your eAG. 12% = 298 mg/dL (240 – 347) 11% = 269 mg/dL (217 – 314) 10% = 240 mg/dL (193 – 282) 9% = 212 mg/dL (170 –249) 8% = 183 mg/dL (147 – 217) 7% = 154 mg/dL (123 – 185) 6% = 126 mg/dL (100 – 152) What can you do with that information? It is recommended that people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes achieve an A1C of 7.0 percent or lower for optimal health, and the prevention of complications. This translates to an average blood sugar before and between meals around 70 to 130 mg/dL. And after meals, under 180 mg/dL. For pregnancy with diabetes, an A1C lower than 6.5 percent is imperative for the healthy development of your baby, and your own health and safety. Post-meal blood sugars for pregnant women is suggested at lower than 120 mg/dL. A non-diabetic’s A1C is Continue reading >>

Healthy A1c Goal

Healthy A1c Goal

Ads by Google Don't think as unattainable by staring up the steps; you must step up the stairs to achieve. Fit non-diabetic person’s A1C percentage is always within 4.2 to 4.6%. These numbers are only from individuals who is fit, non-obese, active, and on a healthy diet. The A1C result depends upon how well you are maintaining your blood-glucose level. If you are maintaining your blood sugar at an optimal range 70-85mg/dl (3.9-4.7mmol/l) at most of the time, then your A1C be in the normal range 4.2-4.6%. A1C goal advised by American Diabetes Association (ADA) A1C goal of 6.5% or less is a more stringent goal. This A1C target is for people who does not experience many hypoglycemia episodes. This may be for individuals who have recently diagnosed with diabetes. A1C goal of 7% is reasonable. This A1C target is for many adults with diabetes who are not pregnant. A1C goal of 7.5% is for children with diabetes (0 to 18 years old). In children, younger than 6 years may be unable to recognize hypoglycemia symptoms. A1C goal of 8% or less is considered a less stringent goal. This A1C target may be for people with severe hypoglycemia experience. This may be for individuals who have many years of diabetes and who have low life expectancy. A1C goal advised by Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) A1C goal of 6.5% or less is for type 2 diabetics to lower nephropathy and retinopathy risk further. They must balance against hypoglycemia risk. A1C goal of 7.1-8.5% is for those who has longstanding diabetes with a history of recurrent severe hypoglycemia. And for those who has limited life expectancy. This target is for those who is hard to achieve an A1C ≤7%. That too after effective doses of multiple anti-hyperglycemic agents, including intensified basal-bolus insulin therapy. A1C go Continue reading >>

Diabetic Since 2 Years Wit Hb A1c 5.2%, Fasting Sugar 144 Mg/dl, But Urinating 10 Times A Day. Why?

Diabetic Since 2 Years Wit Hb A1c 5.2%, Fasting Sugar 144 Mg/dl, But Urinating 10 Times A Day. Why?

The other thing, which is important in your case, is to start running for about 30 min to 1 hour in the evening. This will help you to reduce the glucose concentration in your blood, which will lead to lower fasting blood glucose concentration in the morning. I know that it is hard for you to combine all these things, but you are doing it for your health. 2. Another point I wanted to stress out is any possible urinary tract infection (UTI). Usually, people with diabetes are prone to these kind of infection; therefore you should check your urine (through urinanalysis) more often to catch the UTI in time. 3. Although you have not mentioned your age, I have to remind you that if you have reached your 50s, you should also check your prostate for any problems that run at this age. Hope it helped! All the best! Dr.Alba What the community is asking about: Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

The Normal A1c Level

The Normal A1c Level

You want to control your diabetes as much as possible. You wouldn’t be reading this if you didn’t. So you regularly check your A1C level. This is the best measurement of our blood glucose control that we have now. It tells us what percentage of our hemoglobin – the protein in our red blood cells that carry oxygen – has glucose sticking to it. The less glucose that remains in our bloodstream rather than going to work in the cells that need it the better we feel now and the better our health will continue to be. Less glucose in the bloodstream over time leads to lower A1C values. As we are able to control our diabetes better and better, the reasonable goal is to bring our A1C levels down to normal – the A1C level that people who don’t have diabetes have. But before we can even set that goal, we have to know what the target is. The trouble with setting that target is that different experts tell us that quite different A1C levels are “normal.” They tell us that different levels are normal – but I have never heard of actual studies of normal A1C levels among people without diabetes – until now. The major laboratories that test our levels often say that the normal range is 4.0 to 6.0. They base that range on an old standard chemistry text, Tietz Fundamentals of Clinical Chemistry. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial or DCCT, one of the two largest and most important studies of people with diabetes, said that 6.0 was a normal level. But the other key study, the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study or UKPDS, which compared conventional and intensive therapy in more than 5,000 newly diagnosed people with type 2 diabetes, said that 6.2 is the normal level. Those levels, while unsubstantiated, are close. But then comes along one of my heroes, Dr. Continue reading >>

A Different Approach To Analyzing Age-related Hba1c Values In Non-diabetic Subjects.

A Different Approach To Analyzing Age-related Hba1c Values In Non-diabetic Subjects.

A different approach to analyzing age-related HbA1c values in non-diabetic subjects. Laboratoire de Statistique Informatique Biophysique, UFR Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Abidjan, Ivory Coast. [email protected] Using appropriate statistical tests and taking into account the analytical performance of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements, is it useful to establish HbA1c age-related values in non-diabetic subjects? Non-diabetic subjects (n=135, 72 women and 63 men) from the neuromuscular department of the Piti-Salptrire Hospital (Paris) were involved in our study. Subjects were divided into two groups related to age: 51 patients under 50 years old and 84 subjects aged 50 years or more. Fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c measurements were respectively performed by enzymatic assay using the hexokinase method and high-performance liquid chromatography based on the ion exchange methodology with high precision. We first checked the normality of HbA1c distribution using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Then we compared mean HbA1c in the two age subgroups using the Student's t test. Mean HbA1c was significantly (p<0.0001) higher in the subgroup aged 50 years or more (mean HbA1c=5.2%) than in younger subjects (mean HbA1c=5.0%). Then plots were drawn to check the relationship between HbA1c and age. Under the hypothesis of linearity, determination coefficients (R2) were calculated. However, considering their low values, this hypothesis must be rejected and other factors than age must be retained to explain HbA1c variability. Continue reading >>

Hba1c - 5.2 And Fbs -113 - I Have Done Hba1c | Practo Consult

Hba1c - 5.2 And Fbs -113 - I Have Done Hba1c | Practo Consult

I have done HbA1c test and FBS and values are indicated above. what does this mean? I see this as abnormal Your fasting sugar should be below 100. This might be either a non fasting report or you may in early stage of diabetes. You may want to read more about diabetes here Let others know if this answer was helpful Disclaimer : The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The internet is not a doctor and neither are you. Chat with a real doctor about your health. Detected 5.8 HbA1c. Average Blood Glucose= 120 mg/dl . Is it something I have to worry apart from taking ... Read More My HBA1C value is 6.6% do i need to start consultation and Medication?and i never taken medication for ... Read More She had maintained normal diabetes of below 200 after lunch 6 months back but now it has shot gone up to ... Read More I am a diabetic patient. I have 3 month hba1c ratio as 9.8. how I need to reduce this. It got increased s ... Read More My husbands age is 32, his sugar level after meals it is 253 and fasting 250, we just found out this now, ... Read More Continue reading >>

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

Your Average Blood Sugar: Why It Really Matters

If there was a blood test that could give you valuable information about a major, yet reversible risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and age related dementia, would you want to take it? What if that same blood test could also give you information about your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, vision loss, cancer and how fast you can expect your body to age? What if the test was really cheap? Now, what if you knew that what you were going to have to do to reverse your risk of all these conditions was going to be personally challenging, maybe even really hard, would you still want to take the test? Something to think about, isn’t it? The test I’m talking about does exist. It’s a simple little test that’s run all the time. It’s full implications are rarely considered, however. The test It’s called “hemoglobin A1c” and is sometimes referred to simply as the “A1c” test. In essence, it measures the amount of sugar that has become stuck to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells (hemoglobin is the component in blood that carries oxygen). Because red blood cells live for about 3 to 4 months, the test is usually used to estimate an “average blood sugar” for the previous 3 months. The more sugar floating around in your blood on a daily basis, the higher you A1c value will be. In conventional medicine the test is used to diagnose and monitor treatment goals for diabetics. The implications of a person’s A1c value run much deeper, however. Sugar within the body doesn’t just stick to hemoglobin. It sticks to many tissues that are made of proteins and fats (this accounts for most tissues in your body by the way) and can bind directly to DNA. The compounds formed by this process are called advanced glycation end products or “AGEs” for Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Hba1c

Understanding Your Hba1c

You’ve heard about a diabetes test called a hemoglobin A1C. It’s sometimes shortened to HgbA1c or HbA1c or just A1C. Hopefully, you know what yours is. But do you know what it means and what to do with the information? Hemoglobin is what makes red blood cells red. It consists of several proteins wrapped around an iron-based molecule called heme. Heme attaches to oxygen and carries it to the cells. That’s why iron is important in our diets. We need iron to make heme to carry oxygen, so our cells can breathe. Glucose (sugar) molecules are also floating along in our blood. Glucose attaches itself to all kinds of proteins, including the hemoglobin in red blood cells (RBCs). When glucose levels are high, many more of them will attach. Hemoglobin coated with glucose is called “glycated” or “glycosylated” hemoglobin. Glycation (“sugar-coating”) may not harm an RBC, but it does tell us if the cell has encountered much glucose during its lifetime. The more glucose has been in the blood, the more RBCs will be glycated. This is what an HbA1c test measures. A1C isn’t measuring what your blood glucose level is at the moment. It measures how high glucose has been over the last two months or so. RBCs only live about 100–120 days in the bloodstream. Once they become glycated, they stay glycated for life, so the number of glycated RBCs (HbA1c) gives a good picture of how much glucose has been in the blood recently. The A1C test has several advantages over other tests such as a fasting blood sugar (FBS). You don’t have to fast for an A1C. It can be taken at any time of day. It doesn’t matter what you ate the day before or on the day of the test, because it’s not measuring your current sugar. Normally, between 4.2% and 5.6% of RBCs will be glycated. The America Continue reading >>

"it Isn't Possible To Be Insulin Resistant And Have A 5.2% A1c." - My Doctor

"It isn't possible to be insulin resistant and have a 5.2% A1C." - my doctor I would see if you could get an OGTT (oral glucose tolerance test) along with insulin levels. Diagnosed: 6/30/11 (failed OGTT with bg around 260 at 2 hours) A1C at diagnosis: 5.6 4/9/12 A1c: 5.5 10/22/12 A1c: 5.5 6/4/13 A1c: 5.7 8/9/13 A1c: 5.3 None of us should be commenting on your post without medical training (DD's rules, not mine.) And you left out three important details, age, height, and weight. See another doctor if you are having trouble believing the first one. We all sympathize with your condition, but we cannot give advice since the vast majority of us are not doctors with the requisite medical training (and license...) T2 diagnosed in March 2012, initial A1C: 11% Metformin 1000 mg before breakfast and after dinner, Invokana 100mg before breakfast. Current lab tested A1C: 6.3% Goal is to stay in the 5.x range. Glucose Buddy A1C estimate: 6.0% It's my life and I want to live it to the fullest. I am no longer a "foodie". I eat to live, not live to eat. D.D. Family Glucose Disregulation since 2005 While I agree you should always consult with medical professionals for diagnosis and treatment of your diabetes, you owe it to yourself to be smart. The plain fact is that many medical professionals are not particularly competent and much of the mainstream advice is inherently flawed. Of particular concern is that the fasting blood sugar test and HbA1c are lagging indicators of diabetes and abnormal blood sugar regulation. The diabetes researcher Ralph Defronzo suggests that by the time you are diagnosed with outright diabetes, you have lost 80% of your beta cell function. And in truth, for many people, diabetes is a long and hidden road. For many with blood sugar disregulation, testing bloo Continue reading >>

Hba1c Predicts Diabetes Risk In Children And Adolescents

Hba1c Predicts Diabetes Risk In Children And Adolescents

HbA1c Predicts Diabetes Risk in Children and Adolescents The risk for type 2 diabetes can be predicted and presence of prediabetes can be identified using the HbA1c test with the same accuracy as that for other, less convenient tests, confirm US researchers. Examining data from a long-term study in an American Indian population, the team found that there was no significant difference between HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2-hour postload plasma glucose (2hPG) concentration tests in identifying children who later developed diabetes. The research was published in the January issue of Diabetes Care. Coauthor Madhumita Sinha, MD, from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, in Phoenix, Arizona, said that the benefit of the HbA1c test is its convenience. She told Medscape Medical News that, when assessing an overweight or obese child aged 10 years, "most pediatricians woulddo a fasting blood sugar." However, she noted that "in my opinion, no kid is fasting at 8 o'clock in the morning." Crucially, Dr Sinha believes that, despite the study being conducted in a population known to have a higher risk of developing diabetes, the results are generalizable to other groups. She said that, alongside having followed the population for over 40 years, the "advantage" that the researchers had was being able to conduct all the tests in the same laboratory. "This is a unique data set," Dr Sinha noted, "and since all the lab tests were done at our own facilities in Phoenix, it's very standardized." The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that asymptomatic children and adolescents be screened for type 2 diabetes if they are aged 10 years, have a body mass index 85th percentile for age and sex, and have at leas Continue reading >>

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