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Hba1c 5.1

Random Glucose Test - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Random Glucose Test - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Joseph I. Wolfsdorf, Katharine C. Garvey, in Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric (Seventh Edition) , 2016 Although many insulin regimens have been studied and successfully used in adults with T2D, no comparable data exist in pediatric T2D. As described earlier, all patients with ketosis or ketoacidosis, random blood glucose concentration 250 mg/dl, or A1c >9% should be treated with insulin. Metformin is added after normalization of blood glucose and correction of dehydration. Insulin therapy may be necessary in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients who fail to achieve adequate glycemic control (A1c <7%) after 3 months of lifestyle intervention and treatment with maximum doses of metformin. Long-acting insulin analogues (glargine or detemir) may be added to metformin. A suitable starting dose is 0.2 units/kg/day at dinnertime or bedtime. Twice daily premixed insulin regimens (see Table 49-2) have been efficacious in adults with T2D, with a 2.8% reduction in HbA1c after 28 weeks therapy.104 A short trial with premixed insulin analogues was also beneficial in children.105 Basal-bolus therapy (once a day long-acting-insulin and short-acting insulin before meals) may be a suitable option in the motivated patient who is willing to perform carbohydrate counting. Side effects of insulin therapy are hypoglycemia, increased appetite, and weight gain. Kenneth W. Lindsay PhD FRCS, ... Geraint Fuller MD FRCP, in Neurology and Neurosurgery Illustrated (Fifth Edition) , 2010 Laboratory assessment of suspected metabolic encephalopathy All patients should have a basic biochemical screen: Liver function (albumin, globulin, bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and enzymes) and random blood glucose. Electroencephalography slow wave activity (theta or delta) supports the diagnosis of a dif Continue reading >>

Hba1c Conversion Chart

Hba1c Conversion Chart

The HbA1c test measures how much haemoglobin in the blood has become glycated (chemically bonded with glucose). ••••• HbA1c values have changed and are now reported as a measurement in mmols/mol instead of the percentage previously given. To make sense of the new units and compare these with old units and vice versa, use our HbA1c units converter table below. Old unit = NGSP unit = %HbA1c New unit = IFCC unit = mmol/mol HbA1c Old HbA1c New HbA1c Old HbA1c New 4.0 20 8.1 65 4.1 21 8.2 66 4.2 22 8.3 67 4.3 23 8.4 68 4.4 25 8.5 69 4.5 26 8.6 70 4.6 27 8.7 72 4.7 28 8.8 73 4.8 29 8.9 74 4.9 30 9.0 75 5.0 31 9.1 76 5.1 32 9.2 77 5.2 33 9.3 78 5.3 34 9.4 79 5.4 36 9.5 80 5.5 37 9.6 81 5.6 38 9.7 83 5.7 39 9.8 84 5.8 40 9.9 85 5.9 41 10 86 6.0 42 10.1 87 6.1 43 10.2 88 6.2 44 10.3 89 6.3 45 10.4 90 6.4 46 10.5 91 6.5 48 10.6 92 6.6 49 10.7 93 6.7 50 10.8 95 6.8 51 10.9 96 6.9 52 11.0 97 7.0 53 11.1 98 7.1 54 11.2 99 7.2 55 11.3 100 7.3 56 11.4 101 7.4 57 11.5 102 7.5 58 11.6 103 7.6 60 11.7 104 7.7 61 11.8 105 7.8 62 11.9 107 7.9 63 12.0 108 8.0 64 Sit down with your child to decide what kind of meter they would prefer out of the options available. Hypos Hypos occur when your blood glucose falls too low. PLAY A healthy diet for someone with diabetes is the same as a healthy diet for anyone else. Find out what… Living with diabetes during pregnancy can be challenging, but you can still lead a healthy life. Take control of your… Glucose testing is the process used to measure the amount of glucose in your blood and can be carried out… FreeStyle Optium Neo has a choice of tools designed to help people who use insulin. Understanding your blood glucose level is a beneficial part of diabetes self-management and can help you and your healthcare team… Continue reading >>

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

In the last article I explained the three primary markers we use to track blood sugar: fasting blood glucose (FBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (A1c). We also looked at what the medical establishment considers as normal for these markers. The table below summarizes those values. In this article, we’re going to look at just how “normal” those normal levels are — according to the scientific literature. We’ll also consider which of these three markers is most important in preventing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Marker Normal Pre-diabetes Diabetes Fasting blood glucose (mg/dL) <99 100-125 >126 OGGT / post-meal (mg/dL after 2 hours) <140 140-199 >200 Hemoglobin A1c (%) <6 6-6.4 >6.4 But before we do that, I’d like to make an important point: context is everything. In my work with patients, I never use any single marker alone to determine whether someone has a blood sugar issue. I run a full blood panel that includes fasting glucose, A1c, fructosamine, uric acid and triglycerides (along with other lipids), and I also have them do post-meal testing at home over a period of 3 days with a range of foods. If they have a few post-meal spikes and all other markers or normal, I’m not concerned. If their fasting BG, A1c and fructosamine are all elevated, and they’re having spikes, then I’m concerned and I will investigate further. On a similar note, I’ve written that A1c is not a reliable marker for individuals because of context: there are many non-blood sugar-related conditions that can make A1c appear high or low. So if someone is normal on all of the other blood sugar markers, but has high A1c, I’m usually not concerned. With all of that said, let’s take a look at some of the research. Fasting blood sugar According to cont Continue reading >>

Real Life Tips By Kristie, A 40 Year Old Mom Who Reduced Her Hba1c From 6.1 To 5.1 In 9 Months

Real Life Tips By Kristie, A 40 Year Old Mom Who Reduced Her Hba1c From 6.1 To 5.1 In 9 Months

Real life tips by Kristie, a 40 year old Mom who reduced her HbA1c from 6.1 to 5.1 in 9 months Are you struggling to get your HbA1c below 5.7% ? I know it is a dream of every prediabetic / diabetic to do it. Hi Friends I am very excited to share you a Real life Experience of Kristie,a 40 year old mom from Michigan USA. In todays interview she is going to share how she has brought her HbA1c % from 6.1 to 5.1 in 6 months. That sounds very interesting and inspiring. If a 40 yr old Mom is able to achieve this why cant you do it. Come on read through to find Kristies secrets about controlling her prediabetes. She is a highly motivated individual who likes to motivate others and as a result she is also Admin of a very Resourceful Facebook Group Prediabetes Awareness Im a 40-year-old mom from Michigan. My kids are 5 and 11 and my husband is a police officer. I spent 20 years as a 911 dispatcher and last year I left that field to take a job as a loader in a calcium chloride plant. I enjoy being outside, running and lifting weights. Im hoping to compete in my first powerlifting meet sometime next year. I also practice Krav Maga 2-3 days a week and hope to test for my black belt this July. Basically, Im a mom, a ninja and a Marvel comic obsessed superhero How important do you think is diet for managing diabetes? Diet is huge in controlling this condition. All the exercise in the world, unfortunately, wont outrun a poor diet. What do you prefer to have in Breakfast ? I eat a lot of protein bars for breakfast because I dont have time to cook breakfast. I work 12 hr shifts and have to be at work at 6am. Im on my feet all day and have no facilities or breaks to make a bigger breakfast. On my off days I will often have bacon and eggs or sausage and eggs with my coffee. Lunch is usual Continue reading >>

Hb1ac Increased From 5.1% To 5.54% In One Year

Hb1ac Increased From 5.1% To 5.54% In One Year

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community HB1AC increased from 5.1% to 5.54% in one year Discussion in ' Prediabetes ' started by knockknock123 , Aug 5, 2015 . knockknock123 Don't have diabetes Member A routine blood checkup a year ago gave 5.1% hb1ac. A blood checkup a week ago gave 5.54% hb1ac. The doctor says I am prediabetic. But online forums say that prediabetic is above 5.7%. What do you people think? Should I treat myself as a diabetic? I thought 5.4 was normal and that your understanding was correct. However your reading has increased, in your shoes I would ensure I wasn't overweight, cut out sugary drinks including fruit juice. I would get a blood glucose Meter to monitor my blood glucose after eating. knockknock123 Don't have diabetes Member By the way, my reading was 5.54% and not 5.4% ButtterflyLady Type 2 Well-Known Member Your HbA1c is increasing, but you are not yet prediabetic. Now is the time to lose weight if you need to. Your BMI should be between 20 and 25. You can calculate it here: If you are overweight, even a 5-10% weight loss would be likely to benefit your health considerably. If you need to lose weight and don't make changes, you may be prediabetic within 6-12 months, and diabetic within say 12 months of that. These are guesses based on how I became diabetic, so they are just speculation really. The point is, you have a chance to avoid diabetes - many people have no idea until it's too late. I encourage you to take the opportunity to stop your HbA1c increasing further. Good luck. For people without diabetes, the range is 20-41 mmol/mol For people with diabetes, an HbA1c level of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) is considered good control, although some people may prefer their nu Continue reading >>

Hba1c Test To Be Used For Diagnosis

Hba1c Test To Be Used For Diagnosis

When you were diagnosed with diabetes (or prediabetes), did your doctor do a fingerstick blood test in his office, or give you a fasting plasma glucose test? Or did he make the diagnosis based on your HbA1c level? Although some doctors are already using HbA1c test results as a diagnostic tool, you may be surprised to know that there are currently no official guidelines for doing so. However, that may be about to change. The HbA1c test — a measure of blood glucose levels over 2–3 months that is usually used to assess how well a person is managing his diabetes — may soon be used officially to diagnose Type 2 diabetes as well. Earlier this month, the American Diabetes Association announced that a group of several leading diabetes organizations will publish guidelines in the next six months on using the HbA1c test as a diagnostic tool. Such a consensus statement is necessary because right now there is no agreement on what HbA1c level would constitute a diagnosis of diabetes. Most people who don’t have diabetes have an HbA1c level of 6% or less, and those with a higher HbA1c level may have diabetes. In the future, the HbA1c test will probably be used along with other tests to make a diagnosis. The tests currently in use for diagnosis are the fasting plasma glucose test and the less common oral glucose tolerance test. However, these tests can be inaccurate if a person has eaten recently or is sick. Advantages of the HbA1c test are that it can be given at any time and, because it reflects blood glucose levels over a longer period, it is not unduly influenced by events on the day of the test. Do you think that using HbA1c as a diagnostic tool is a smart move? Do you remember what your HbA1c was when you were diagnosed? Let us know with a comment here. Continue reading >>

Glycosylated Haemoglobin For Screening And Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Glycosylated Haemoglobin For Screening And Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Objectives The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is a cumbersome test that is time consuming, labour intensive and often poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the most accepted measure of chronic glycaemia outside of pregnancy. HbA1c is an uncomplicated test, less time consuming, does not require any specific patient preparation and is considered straightforward compared with the OGTT. Therefore, we prospectively tested the utility of the HbA1c when used as a screening tool in pregnancy for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Settings Primary health care. Single tertiary referral centre, Tasmania, Australia. Participants A direct comparison between HbA1c levels and the OGTT results in pregnant women, tested concurrently at the 24–28 gestational week, was undertaken. A full profile of 480 pregnant women during the period from September 2012 to July 2014 was completed. Median and mean age of participants was 29 years (range 18–47 years). Interventions A simultaneous prospective assessment of HbA1c versus standard OGTT in a cohort of consecutive pregnant women presenting to our institute was performed. Results The number of women who had GDM according to OGTT criteria was 57, representing 11.9% of the evaluated 480 pregnant women. Using a cut-off value for HbA1c at 5.1% (32 mmol/mol) for detecting GDM showed sensitivity of 61% and specificity of 68% with negative predictive value (NPV) of 93%, versus sensitivity of 27% and specificity of 95% with NPV of 91% when using HbA1c cut-off value of 5.4% (36 mmol/mol). Conclusions Our results suggest that pregnant women with an HbA1c of≥5.4% (36 mmol/mol) should proceed with an OGTT. This may result in a significant reduction in the burden of testing on both patients and t Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c Test (hba1c, A1c, Hb1c)

Hemoglobin A1c definition and facts Hemoglobin A1c is a protein on the surface of red blood cells that sugar molecules stick to, usually for the life of the red blood cell (about three months). The higher the level of glucose in the blood, the higher the level of hemoglobin A1c is detectable on red blood cells. Hemoglobin A1c levels correlate with average levels of glucose in the blood over an approximately three-month time period. Normal ranges for hemoglobin A1c in people without diabetes is about 4% to 5.9%. People with diabetes with poor glucose control have hemoglobin A1c levels above 7%. Hemoglobin A1c levels are routinely used to determine blood sugar control over time in people with diabetes. Decreasing hemoglobin A1c levels by 1% may decrease the risk of microvascular complications (for example, diabetic eye, nerve, or kidney disease) by 10%. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be checked, according to the American Diabetic Association, every six months in individuals with stable blood sugar control, and every three months if the person is trying to establish stable blood sugar control. Hemoglobin A1c has many other names such as glycohemoglobin, glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and HbA1c. To explain what hemoglobin A1c is, think in simple terms. Sugar sticks to things, and when it has been stuck to something for a long time it's harder to the get sugar (glucose) off. In the body, sugar sticks too, particularly to proteins. The red blood cells that circulate in the body live for about three months before they die. When sugar (glucose) sticks to these red blood cells by binding to hemoglobin A1c, it gives us an idea of how much glucose has been around in the blood for the preceding three months. Hemoglobin A1c is a minor component of hemoglobin to which gl Continue reading >>

Glycated Hemoglobin (hba1c) Correlation With Severity Of Coronary Artery Disease In Non-diabetic Patients - A Hospital Based Study From North-eastern India

Glycated Hemoglobin (hba1c) Correlation With Severity Of Coronary Artery Disease In Non-diabetic Patients - A Hospital Based Study From North-eastern India

Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Correlation with Severity of Coronary Artery Disease in Non-diabetic Patients - A Hospital based Study from North-Eastern India 1 Associate Professor, Department of Cardiology, Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, Assam, India. 2 Senior Resident, Department of Cardiology, Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, Assam, India. 3 Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiology, Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, Assam, India. NAME, ADDRESS, E-MAIL ID OF THE CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Dr. Farhin Iqbal, Assistant Professor, Department of Cardiology, Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, Assam, India. E-mail: [email protected] Received 2016 Jun 28; Revisions requested 2016 Jul 26; Accepted 2016 Aug 17. Copyright 2016 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels are predictive of cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus, however, association of HbA1c with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) in non-diabetics is inconsistent. To evaluate the correlation between HbA1c level and severity of CAD in non-diabetic patients using SYNTAX score in a cohort of proven CAD on angiography at Gauhati Medical College, Guwahati, Assam, India, which is a major tertiary care hospital of North-Eastern India. We prospectively collected data of non-diabetic patients with proven CAD on angiography from June 2014 to June 2015. Patients were divided into four groups (interquartiles) according to HbA1c levels, less than 4.8%, 4.8% to 5.1%, 5.1% to 5.6%, and 5.6% to 6.5%. Severity of CAD was assessed using SYNTAX score and the number of coronary vessels diseased. We compared different quartiles of HbA1c with regard to SYNTAX score and number of diseased vessels. A total of 346 patients were included in the study. Mean age was 58.1 Continue reading >>

Glucose Levels And Risk Of Frailty

Glucose Levels And Risk Of Frailty

The association between glucose levels and incident frailty in older persons remains unclear. We examined the extent to which higher glucose levels in older adults with and without diabetes are related to risk of frailty. The data are from the Adult Changes in Thought study. We identified 1,848 individuals aged 65+ without dementia for whom glucose levels from laboratory measurements of glucose and glycated hemoglobin were available. Physical frailty using modified Frieds criteria was determined from biennial assessments. Frailty hazard was modeled as a function of time-varying measures of diabetes and average glucose levels using Cox regression. A total of 578 incident frailty cases (94 with diabetes, 484 without) occurred during a median follow-up of 4.8 years. The adjusted hazard ratio for frailty comparing those with and without diabetes was 1.52 (95% confidence interval = 1.191.94). In participants without diabetes, modeling suggested elevated frailty risk with greater average glucose levels ( p = .019); for example, a glucose level of 110mg/dL compared with 100mg/dL yielded a hazard ratio of 1.32 (95% confidence interval = 1.091.59). In participants with diabetes, glucose levels less than 160mg/dL and greater than 180mg/dL were related to increased risk of frailty ( p = .001). Higher glucose levels may be a risk factor for frailty in older adults without diabetes. The apparent U-shape association between glucose levels and frailty in people with diabetes is consistent with the literature on glycemia and mortality and deserves further examination. Frailty , Diabetes , Glucose levels , Older adults , Prospective With the aging of the global population physical frailty has become an important concern in public health worldwide ( 1 , 2 ). The most widely used operati Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

Diabetes Calculators

Diabetes Calculators

HbA1c (%) Estimated Average (eAG) (mg/dL) Estimated Average (eAG) (mmol/l) 5 97 5.4 6 126 7.0 7 154 8.6 8 183 10.2 9 212 11.8 10 240 13.4 11 269 14.9 12 298 16.5 You can use the calculators on this page to convert HbA1c and estimated average blood sugars. You can also convert from mg/dL, the measurements used in the USA, and mmol which is used by most of the rest of the world. Convert Blood Sugar from US (mg/dl) to UK (mmol/L) The difference is that mg/dL is a measure of weight while mmol is a measure of volume. US: UK: (click on other box to calculate) Formulas US (mg/dl) is the UK (mmol/L) number multiplied by 18. UK (mmol/L) is the US (mg/dl) number divided by 18. Convert HbA1c to Average Blood Glucose Reading Enter HbA1c (Glycosylated Hemoglobin): % Avg. plasma blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Avg. whole blood glucose = mg/dl mmol/L Formulas Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mg/dl) = (HbA1c * 35.6) - 77.3 Avg. Plasma Blood Glucose (mmol/L) = (HbA1c * 1.98) - 4.29 Avg. whole blood glucose = Plasma Blood Glucose / 1.12 Continue reading >>

Thank You All, My Hba1c Is Down To 5.1

Thank You All, My Hba1c Is Down To 5.1

I got my HbA1C tested yesterday from SRL diagnostics, to my surprise it is down to 5.1%. with FBSL of 92 and PPBSL of 109. Looking back, well!!!!.. it was all hardwork.....i had reduced my weight from 83 kg to currently at 65 kg, My BMI is below 25 now (height 1.63meters). Weight reduction was due to increased active lifestyle. I stopped using my bike for every small things!!!! Morning walk for 30-45 minutes also helped In October 2015 my HbA1C was 8.3% with FBSL of 220 and PPBSL of 240. I initially took Glycomet-500 for 1 month. then after doctors instructions stopped the same. With the help of this forum i have modified my diet basically trying to cut down carbs(mainly rice) and adding Ghee in meals to supplement my energy needs. Anup ji, your posts here in this forum have been an eye opener for me. I'm sure many people like me have benefitted from your posts. Please share your daily routine and food intake in detail so others can benefit and get encouraged I'm 40 years old. I was a sweet crazy person till i was detected diabetic. I used to love pizza. Hoteling was a common thing for me. My weight was well over 83 kg My job profile required me to sit at a place for a longer time. This had a bad effect on my health. I became overweight and diabetic. I was detected high BSL at company's clinic. They were looking for volunteer's to check BP and BSL. I was under the impression that my BP is high and BSL is alright. But after the tests it was the other way around. My fasting BSL was way too high (220 and 200 on two separate days) and PPBSL 240 and 237 on two separate days). My company doctor told me that this is a warning sigh by your body to change your lifestyle or in long run you will pay a heavy price. from that day (almost 8 months ago) till now i haven't eaten any s Continue reading >>

Normal But Increasing Hemoglobin A1c Levels Predict Progression From Islet Autoimmunity To Overt Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Autoimmunity Study In The Young (daisy).

Normal But Increasing Hemoglobin A1c Levels Predict Progression From Islet Autoimmunity To Overt Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Autoimmunity Study In The Young (daisy).

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the utility of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurements in the early detection of clinical type 1 diabetes during prospective follow-up of children with islet autoimmunity. METHODS: The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) has followed for development of islet autoimmunity and diabetes general population newborns carrying human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes conferring risk for type 1 diabetes and young siblings or offspring of people with type 1 diabetes. Testing for autoantibodies was performed at least once in 2234 and twice or more in 1887 children. Among the latter, 100 children tested positive on at least two consecutive visits. To date, 92 children have developed persistent islet autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), insulin, or insulinoma associated antigen-2 (IA-2) and had at least two subsequent clinic visits. These children had study visits with point-of-care testing for HbA1c and random glucose every 3-6 months and those with random plasma glucose above 11.1 mmol/L or HbA1c above 6.3% were evaluated by a pediatric endocrinologist for clinical diabetes. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 3.4 yr from onset of autoimmunity, 28 children developed type 1 diabetes, at mean age of 6.5 yr. Mean prediagnostic HbA1c was 5.1% [standard deviation (SD) = 0.4%]. In a Cox regression model accounting for changes in values in individuals over time, increase in HbA1c predicted increased risk of progression to type 1 diabetes, hazard ratio = 4.8 (95% confidence interval 3.0-7.7) for each SD of 0.4%, independent of random glucose and number of autoantibodies. Increase in random plasma glucose levels only marginally predicted risk of progression (hazard ratio = 1.4, 95% confidence interval 1.0 Continue reading >>

Jay: 15kg Weight Loss And Hba1c Of 5.1%

Jay: 15kg Weight Loss And Hba1c Of 5.1%

Blood Glucose , Exercise , Nutrition , Stories We are proud to share some words from Jay (age 46), who was one of our early GlycoLeap users. After 6 months on GlycoLeap, Jay has successfully reduced his weight by 16kg (14% of his initial weight), and has reduced his HbA1c from 8.9% to 5.1%. I am a Type 2 Diabetic and have been diagnosed for more than a decade. I have never followed through on the treatments and the fact that I felt that I was still young and will not affect me until I am older, I was so wrong here. A couple of months ago, after an eye examination, I was told that the nerves around my eyes have been damaged by my diabetes. It was caused because of uncontrolled sugar levels although I have been on medication for a few years. At this point, I realized that if I do not take control of by diabetes, I might never see my children grow up. I finally woke up and decided I needed to do something about it. I was searching online when I stumbled onto their website, a Singapore company called GlycoLeap , and was actually surprise that there is a local company providing these services. Their approach is about behavioural change where they provide support and education on what diabetes is and what one can do to face diabetes. So I decided togive it a try and it was the best decision I have ever made for my health. GlycoLeap has helped me to understand and deal with my diabetes with confidence now that I know how to live with it. In fact, without their support, I could not have done this alone. The personalized approach from their great team of dietitians, psychologist and medical officer has help me to understand how our local cuisines affect my sugar levels. In fact, I am still enjoying my favourite unhealthy dishes but of course now I have to balance it out. I eat Continue reading >>

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