diabetestalk.net

Hawaii Department Of Health Diabetes

Diabetes Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

Diabetes Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division

Diabetes Chronic Disease Prevention & Health Promotion Division Home What is Diabetes? Diabetes Prevention & Control Program The Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) is funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and provides public health leadership for diabetes in the state. A major function of DPCP is to convene stakeholders in order to better coordinate the Hawaii diabetes health system and achieve common goals. DPCP also works with partners to promote diabetes prevention and management throughout the state. To help promote diabetes prevention, DPCP formed the Prediabetes Task Force which focuses on: 1) awareness of prediabetes; 2) availability and support of CDC-recognized Diabetes Prevention Programs (DPPs); 3) clinical screening, testing, and referral to DPPs; and 4) coverage of DPPs by employers and health plans. With the help of the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors , Hawaii Primary Care Association , and the YMCA of Honolulu , the Task Force has created an action plan called, The Hawaii Diabetes Prevention Plan to Scale and Sustain the National Diabetes Prevention Program to facilitate the establishment and growth of DPPs. Along with community stakeholders, the DPCP is presently working to achieve the following priorities identified in the plan: Develop an awareness campaign targeted to the public and health care sector. Establish at least one accessible, culturally-appropriate CDC-recognized diabetes prevention program serving a priority population on each island. Increase by two the number of health systems that develop a partnership and a data sharing agreement with a community organization and a CDC-recognized diabetes prevention program to increase screenings and referrals into DPP. Disseminate findings a Continue reading >>

Building Your Diabetes Education Program

Building Your Diabetes Education Program

EVENT IS FULL AND NO LONGER TAKING REGISTRATIONS AADEs workshop, Building Your Diabetes Education Program Everything You Need to Know and More, is designed to help not only navigate the National Standards but also understand other essential elements required for a comprehensive DMSE program. By attending this program, you will be provided with: A comprehensive review of the National Standards Reimbursement and documentation strategies An understanding on how to set SMART goals Live chart auditing to help you develop your own charting requirements A binder full of sample resources to use in your own practice Join us to network and brainstorm innovative ways to improve your practice all while earning 6 CE (RN, RD, RPh see registration page). Anyone looking to start or improve a diabetes education program is invited to attend! *Program cost is $295 far other locations. The rate far this location is due to funding from the Hawaii State Department of Health** and the Hawaii Association of Diabetes Educators. Registration: http:/ /tinyurl.com/DSME-HI Local event chairs Viola Genadio: Viola.Ge[email protected], Naomi Fukuda: [email protected] or Valerie Ah Cook: [email protected] To reach AADE staff, please contact Peter Kim: [email protected] Continue reading >>

Job Bulletin

Job Bulletin

This posting is for the State of Hawaii, Department of Health, Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division. The position is located on the Island of Oahu, (Downtown). $4,231 per month, salary commensurate w/ training and experience If you have any questions regarding this non-civil service exempt position, please contact Mahealani Kaonohi at (808) 586-4488. The State Recruiting Office will refer all inquiries regarding this exempt position to the Department of Health. Exempt, non-civil service appointment. Responsible for ensuring that the requirements of the "Strategies to Prevent Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Disease and Stroke among Adults in Hawaii's Four Main Counties" (SPODHDS) grant are fulfilled, including planning, Division coordination, implementation, and state to federal communication, and reporting to build the Division's capacity in health promotion and education. EDUCATION: Graduation from a four (4) year accredited college or university with a baccalaureate degree. A master's in public health, public administration and planning, business administration, or any of the health or social sciences is preferred. GENERAL EXPERIENCE: One and one half (1) years of responsible professional work experience which required a high degree of analytical skills. Such experience must have involved gathering, evaluating, and analyzing facts and other pertinent information required to resolve problems and/or to determine and recommend appropriate courses of action. Such experience must have also demonstrated the ability to: elicit information, orally and in writing; read, comprehend, interpret, and evaluate technical subjects, analyses, or proposals; apply problem-solving methods and techniques, such as defining and analyzing problems, identifying alternative c Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus Among Medicaid Beneficiaries In Hawaii

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus Among Medicaid Beneficiaries In Hawaii

Risk of Diabetes Mellitus Among Medicaid Beneficiaries in Hawaii ORIGINAL RESEARCH Volume 14 November 22, 2017 Dongmei Li, PhD1; Chuan C. Chinn, PhD2; Ritabelle Fernandes, MD, MPH2; Christina M.B. Wang, MPH, RN2; Myra D. Smith, MPH2; Rebecca Rude Ozaki, PhD2 ( View author affiliations ) Suggested citation for this article: Li D, Chinn CC, Fernandes R, Wang CM, Smith MD, Ozaki RR. Risk of Diabetes Mellitus Among Medicaid Beneficiaries in Hawaii. Prev Chronic Dis 2017;14:170095. DOI: . Medicaid is the largest primary health insurance for low-income populations in the United States, and it provides comprehensive benefits to cover treatment and services costs for chronic diseases, including diabetes. The standardized per capita spending on diabetes by Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the fee-for-service program in Hawaii increased from 2012 to 2015. We examined the difference in odds of diabetes between Medicaid and non-Medicaid populations in major racial/ethnic groups in Hawaii. We used data from 2013 through 2015 from the Hawaii Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System in this cross-sectional study to compare the difference in risk for self-reported diabetes between Medicaid (n = 1,889) and non-Medicaid (n = 17,207) beneficiaries. We used multivariate logistic regression models that could accommodate the complex sampling design to examine the difference in odds of diabetes between the 2 populations. In Hawaii, the Medicaid population was younger, was less educated, had more health impairments, and was more likely to be obese and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander (NH/OPI) than the non-Medicaid population. The unadjusted prevalence of diabetes in the Medicaid population in Hawaii was higher than that for the non-Medicaid population (10.3% vs 8.9%, P = .02). After Continue reading >>

Health Care Innovation Awards: Hawaii

Health Care Innovation Awards: Hawaii

Innovation Center Home > Innovation Models > Health Care Innovation Awards Projects shown may have also operated in other states (see the Geographic Reach) Descriptions and project data (e.g. gross savings estimates, population served, etc.) are 3 year estimates provided by each organization and are based on budget submissions required by the Health Care Innovation Awards application process. While all projectswere expected to produce cost savings beyond the 3 year grant award, some may not achieve net cost savings until after the initial 3-year period due to start-up-costs, change in care patterns and intervention effect on health status. Project Title: Improving the health and care of low-income diabetics at reduced costs Summary: FirstVitals Health and Wellness Inc., in partnership with AlohaCare, received an award to implement and test a care coordination and health information technology plan that will better regulate glucose levels for Medicaid-eligible patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes who have the complication of peripheral neuropathy. FirstVitals will create a secured database that will receive data feeds from a combination of wireless glucose meters and tablets, which are expected to improve health education and social networking around diabetes management issues. The "real time" information will be available to integrated care coordinators, patients, physicians and other approved caregivers, informing decisions about care and enabling caregivers to track and monitor glucose levels, improve medication adherence, and increase patient safety and the effectiveness of treatment. The project will reduce foot ulcers and amputations and attendant complications, and reduce emergency room visits and hospitalizations. Over a three-year period, FirstVitals progra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Education-group Or Individual Sessions - Windward Oahu, Hawaii (hi) - Adventist Health Castle

Diabetes Education-group Or Individual Sessions - Windward Oahu, Hawaii (hi) - Adventist Health Castle

Diabetes Education-Group or Individual SessionsGroup or Individual SessionsLead by a Diabetes Educator, this series of five sessions is designed to transform the way you learn about and manage Type II diabetes. Each session is interactive and informative. Participants are encouraged to set goals to work on between sessions. Program includes “Type 2 BASICS” book. Family members or caregivers are also welcome to attend, but please reserve a spot in advance.

  • All sessions are facilitated by a registered dietitian.
  • Description of diabetes disease process and treatment options
  • Incorporating nutritional management into lifestyle
  • Incorporating physical activity into lifestyle
  • Using medications safely
  • Monitoring blood glucose, understanding target goals and interpreting results
  • Preventing, detecting, and treating chronic complications
  • Developing personal strategies to address psychosocial issues and concerns
  • Developing personal strategies to promote health and behavior change
Both morning and evening options are available. Call for an appointment or to find out when the next group session starts.Please call (808) 263-5050 for more information.Field 1Custom Field 2Custom Field 3DiabetesClassTweet Diabetes Education-Group or Individual Sessions Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Spodhds Pre-diabetes 1422-specialist

Spodhds Pre-diabetes 1422-specialist

EDUCATION: Graduation from a four (4) year accredited college or university with a baccalaureate degree, preferably with courses or training in public health, health services, or related field. General Experience: One and one half (1) years of responsible professional work experience which required a high degree of analytical skills. Such experience must have involved gathering, evaluating, and analyzing facts and other pertinent information required to resolve problems and/or to determine and recommend appropriate courses of action. Such experience must have also demonstrated the ability to: elicit information, orally and in writing; read, comprehend, interpret and evaluate technical subject, analyses or proposals; apply problem-solving methods and techniques, such as defining and analyzing problems, identifying alternative courses of action, using judgment in determining appropriate alternatives; and prepare clear and concise written reports and recommendations for action. Specialized Experience: One (1) year of professional work experience in public health approach to chronic disease prevention, in particular diabetes prevention programs, which involved work such as monitoring, evaluating, or conducting programs of work, to make recommendations for the development or revisions of system standards, policies, or procedures; gathering and analyzing data to determine conformance with standards and requirements and recommending improvements or developing training materials; giving technical guidance and direction pertaining to program standards and requirements. LICENSE: Valid State of Hawaii drivers license is preferred. LEGAL AUTHORIZATION TO WORK REQUIREMENT: The State of Hawaii requires that all persons seeking employment with the government of the State shall be cit Continue reading >>

U.s. Senator Brian Schatz Of Hawaii

U.s. Senator Brian Schatz Of Hawaii

Appropriations Committee Approves Health and Education Spending for Hawaii Washington, DCToday, Senator Brian Schatz announced that the Senate Appropriations Committee passed the fiscal year 2014 appropriations bill for Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies. The bill includes funding for several Native Hawaiian programs, including those related to health care and education. This is a key step for securing critical funding to assist Hawaii families in tough budgetary times. Since January, I have worked with Appropriations Committee Chair Barbara Mikulski and Subcommittee Chair Tom Harkin on securing funding for some of the most important programs for Hawaii families, particularly those that address the health and education gaps facing Native Hawaiians, said Senator Brian Schatz, a member of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. I thank my colleagues for their work on this important bill and for prioritizing Hawaii families during a time where were seeing cuts to programs due to sequestration. Funding levels as included in the bill passed by the Committee include: Native Hawaiian Health Care Program, Health Resources and Service Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services- $14,421,000 Funding for Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems (NHHCS) programs is critical in order to improve the health of the Native Hawaiian population to the highest possible level. Many Native Hawaiians face geographical, cultural, and financial barriers that prevent them from accessing existing health services. Native Hawaiian Health Centers, run through the NHHCS program, provide critical access to health education, promotion, disease prevention, and basic primary care services for the over 8,400 Native Hawaiians enrolled in the NHHCS programs. The C Continue reading >>

The Burden Of Diagnosed And Undiagnosed Diabetes In Native Hawaiian And Asian American Hospitalized Patients - Sciencedirect

The Burden Of Diagnosed And Undiagnosed Diabetes In Native Hawaiian And Asian American Hospitalized Patients - Sciencedirect

Volume 2, Issue 4 , December 2015, Pages 115-124 The burden of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes in Native Hawaiian and Asian American hospitalized patients Author links open overlay panel T.L.Sentella 38% of Native Hawaiian, 34% of Japanese, 33% of Filipino, 23% of Chinese and 19% of White inpatients had diagnosed diabetes. 3% Native Hawaiian, 3% Japanese, 4% Filipino, 4% Chinese and 4% White inpatients had potentially undiagnosed diabetes. Few potentially undiagnosed diabetes cases were found. Prospective methods are recommended. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with a longer hospital stay and higher mortality. Inpatient diabetes screening with HbA1c is suggested, which should be evaluated prospectively for improved outcomes. Little is known about diabetes in hospitalized Native Hawaiians and Asian Americans. We determined the burden of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed) among hospitalized Native Hawaiian, Asian (Filipino, Chinese, Japanese), and White patients. Diagnosed diabetes was determined from discharge data from a major medical center in Hawaii during 20072008. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was determined by Hemoglobin A1c 6.5% or glucose 200 mg/dl values for those without diagnosed diabetes. Multivariable log-binomial models predicted diabetes (potentially undiagnosed and diagnosed, separately) controlling for socio-demographic factors. Of 17,828 hospitalized patients, 3.4% had potentially undiagnosed diabetes and 30.5% had diagnosed diabetes. In multivariable models compared to Whites, Native Hawaiian and all Asian subgroups had significantly higher percentages of diagnosed diabetes, but not of potentially undiagnosed diabetes. Potentially undiagnosed diabetes was associated with significantly more hospitalizations during the study Continue reading >>

Prevent Diabetes

Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes Risk Test Prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) is higher than normal, but it's not too late to lower your risk. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented by making changes such as exercising, eating a healthy diet, and controlling your weight. Type 2 diabetes is a serious disease that can cause heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney failure, or loss of feet or legs. Take this test to find out if you could be at risk. Results will be e-mailed to you, and we encourage you to take them to your healthcare provider to discuss the results. You can also download a hard copy by clicking here. Continue reading >>

Fdip - Sweet Success Hawaii Diabetes In Pregnancy Program

Fdip - Sweet Success Hawaii Diabetes In Pregnancy Program

The goal of the Diabetes in Pregnancy Program is to improve outcomes for women who have pregnancies affected by diabetes. The program is an associate program of the SSEP Sweet Success Program and is recognized by the American Diabetes Association as meeting the standards for diabetes self-management education. Diabetes Educators provide educational, nutritional and emotional resources to support the expectant mother and baby throughout the pregnancy and immediate postpartum experience. Blood glucose values are reviewed one to two times per week depending on the blood glucose values by our maternal fetal specialists and treatment is adjusted as needed. Most insurance plans are accepted to ensure that all women, regardless of their financial circumstances, have access to diabetes education and management. Education provided is respectful of cultural preferences and learning needs. The staff of the Diabetes in Pregnancy Program are experienced and have a passion for teaching diabetes education. The following are some qualifications and achievements of various team members: certification in diabetes education, first certified diabetes nurse educator in Hawaii, founding members of the Hawaii Association of Diabetes Educators, board certification in perinatal nursing, masters level education, Hawaii Association of Diabetes Educators Diabetes Educator of the Year Award, American Association of Diabetes Educators Diabetes Educator of the Year Award, Hawaii Association of Diabetes Educators Legislative Leadership Award, Hawaii State Department of Health Employee of the Year Award, diabetes research experience, former national board member of the American Association of Diabetes Educators, former board member of the American Diabetes Association, Hawaii Chapter, and currently me Continue reading >>

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Health & Fitness Chronic Disease Programs YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program Diabetes affects 1 in 3 adults in Hawaii costing an estimated $1.5 billion each year. Diabetes is also the leading cause of heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease and nerve disease. Many cases of Type 2 diabetes can be avoided if discovered and treated early. This is known as pre-diabetes, which is seen in about 28,800 adults in Hawaii. But only 10% of those people know they have pre-diabetes. Pre-diabetes is, in most cases, a reversible condition where blood glucose levels are higher than normal. People with pre-diabetes are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years, unless preventative action is taken, and that is where the YMCA of Honolulu can help. The YMCAs Diabetes Prevention Program (Y-DPP) is part of the Centers for Disease Control Diabetes Prevention program and is also endorsed by the Diabetes Prevention and Control Alliance. Research conducted by the National Institutes of Health has proven that programs like Y-DPP can reduce the number of cases of type 2 diabetes by almost 60%. We will work with you through our YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program to be sure you receive the best possible support and advice. You will learn ways to eat healthier, increase physical activity and how to make other changes to improve your overall health and well-being. Lifestyle changes like this can prevent or delay development of Type 2 diabetes for those at high risk. To participate in the program, you must be: Overweight (BMI 22 if Asian/ 25 if other) Diagnosed with pre-diabetes via one of three blood tests or a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes Or, if you don't have a blood test result, you must have a qualifying risk score (9) which you can determine in just 60 seconds by tak Continue reading >>

Hawaii Health Matters :: Indicators :: Diabetics Who Receive Formal Diabetes Education :: State : Hawaii

Hawaii Health Matters :: Indicators :: Diabetics Who Receive Formal Diabetes Education :: State : Hawaii

Diabetics who Receive Formal Diabetes Education The gauge represents the distribution of communities reporting the data, and tells you how you compare to other communities. Keep in mind that in some cases, high values are "good" and sometimes high values are "bad." Green represents the "best" 50th percentile. Yellow represents the 50th to 25th quartile. The circle represents a comparison to a target value. The current value has met, or is better than the target value. The current value not met the target value. The diamond represents a comparison to a single value. The current value is lower than the comparison value. The current value is higher than the comparison value. The current value is not statistically different from the comparison value. The square represents the measured trend. There has been a non-significant increase over time. There has been a non-significant decrease over time. There has been a significant increase over time. There has been a significant decrease over time. There has been neither a statistically significant increase nor decrease over time. The triangle represents a comparison to a prior value. The current value is higher than the previously measured value. The current value is lower than the previously measured value. The current value is not statistically different from the previously measured value. Our icons are color-coded. Green is good. Red is bad. Blue is neither. Significantly better than the overall value Significantly worse than the overall value Not significantly different than the overall value (or no confidence intervals available) Continue reading >>

Worried About Diabetes? The State Has A New Way To Help You Stay - Hawaii News Now - Kgmb And Khnl

Worried About Diabetes? The State Has A New Way To Help You Stay - Hawaii News Now - Kgmb And Khnl

Worried about diabetes? The state has a new way to help you stay - Hawaii News Now - KGMB and KHNL Worried about diabetes? The state has a new way to help you stay informed Hawaii is dealing with an epidemic of Type-2 diabetes, and thousands of otherswith pre-diabetesare on the verge of the disease. That's why the state's Health Department wants Hawaii residents to get informed:to see if they have either condition, and to consult with their doctor or health care provider. To help spread the word, theDOH is enlistinglocal actors to star in new advertising spots --some of whom have battled the chronic illness themselves. Dr. Virginia Pressler, the state's health director,says the print, television and web campaign comes after a near doubling of the disease in Hawaii over the last 15 years. "The good thing is that there is something we can actually do about it," Pressler said."At least for Type-2 diabetes, which is preventable." The state says 600,000 people -- one out of every two adults in Hawaii -- have either prediabetes or Type-2 diabetes. "Prediabetes is a serious health condition that puts people at risk for Type-2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke," said Dr. Pressler."The good news is you can reverse prediabetes with basic lifestyle changes. Frank DeLima, the famous local actor and comedian, plays a staring role in the TV spots. DeLima says hehadType-2 diabetes, and that his doctor told him he needed to lose 100 pounds. DeLima underwent a lifestyle change, he says, byeating more vegetables, working out, and instituting portion control.He was able to reverse it. "And I lost the weight, controlled my Type-2 diabetes, off the medication, the doctor's happy,"DeLima says. The state says diabetes is a serious issue that can lead to life and death situations, but the c Continue reading >>

More in diabetes