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Has Anyone Been Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Re: There Is A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Re: There Is A Cure For Type 1 Diabetes

Heal Type 2 Diabetes Simple, 3-step natural approach heals diabetes within a month. No... ”I Cured My Candida” ”How I Finally Cured My Candida After Years of Suffering!” Avoiding Limb Amputation Viruses love sugar and integrate into the legs and may cause ... Hi, I have not had any kidney damage that I am aware of. In the past few years I have felt some minor aches in the kidney region and that prompted me to do some cleansing. I have done Shultze's kidney cleanse and highly recommend it. His overall information about kidney cleansing is really great, and the products I have bought from him are far and away the most powerful I have ever tried. (his herbs are really, really powerful!) If I were you I would go to his website and read up on his kidney newsletters and get a kidney cleanse kit or two from him.(he even used to show people how to make the products if they didn't want to buy from him) Shultze is a real healer. Money does not drive him. Young's diet would be very safe for kidney damage and would be a big aid in reversing it from my perspective. His diet is Vegan and he has you go primarily raw vegan. His wife gives some great recipes in the back and my wife and I have tried these with good results. I do not use antifungals, but Garlic is probably the most potent out there. Shultze is a big proponent of Garlic and other common foods. He has you eat a lot of it. Young is a microbiologist and has seen red blood cells morph into a yeast cell. He was stunned, but then learned that by changing the environment of the cell, you could cause this type of effect. Yeast Overgrowth is a problem for a lot of people, but Young relates that it is caused by an overly acidic environment in the body caused by overly acidic food ingestion.(yeast likes an acidic environment) Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes | Nutritional Medicine

Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes | Nutritional Medicine

I treat many type 1 diabetic patients in my practice. It’s a tough disease that takes an emotional and physical toll on patients and their families. Diabetes requires constant diligence and frequent monitoring of blood sugar levels. What is type 1 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes, also known as diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes, is an autoimmune disease that most often affects children and young adults. It accounts for only 5% of all diabetes cases. With type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Insulin is necessary to process the sugar from foods so the cells can use it for energy. To survive, a type 1 diabetic must have supplementation with synthetic insulin, either by multiple daily injections or insulin pump devices. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes include: Rapid weight loss, despite increased hunger Extreme thirst Increased urination Severe fatigue Blurred vision Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal Anyone experiencing one or more of these symptoms should seek medical attention immediately. Researching a type 1 diabetes cure Currently there’s a great deal of money and research being invested into the search for a “cure” for diabetes. Two avenues of research are listed below. 1) Islet cell transportation — With this technique, insulin producing cells are harvested from a deceased donor. Traditionally, these cells are then implanted into the diabetic patient’s liver. Generally the procedure is done twice, using local anesthetic. It is believed this procedure could help patients who have more that one hypo (hypoglycemia) each year. Islet cell transplantation can improve blood glucose control, improve sensitivity to hypoglycemia symptoms, and reduce or eliminate the need for insulin injections. H Continue reading >>

Should You Get A Pancreas Transplant For Type 1 Diabetes?

Should You Get A Pancreas Transplant For Type 1 Diabetes?

You’re considering a pancreas transplant to cure your type 1 diabetes, but have questions – This episode of The Scope is for you. Dr. Jeffery Campsen, surgical director of transplants, talks about the benefits of a pancreas transplant for type one diabetes patients, how it works compared to traditional methods of controlling the disease and why it is one of the best options for many people. Transcript Announcer: Interesting, informative and all in the name of better health. This is The Scope Health Sciences Radio. Interviewer: A lot of people with Type 1 diabetes believe that the insulin shots and a pump is enough, but there might actually be a better option, a pancreas transplant. We're with Dr. Paul Campsen, Surgical Director of Pancreas Transplant Surgery with the University of Utah. That option is pancreatic surgery. Dr. Paul Campsen: That's correct. Right now we do pancreas transplants for Type 1 diabetics. Type 1 diabetics can't survive without insulin, so they give themselves shots and they can administer this sometimes through am insulin pump which is a very good way to keep them alive. The control that they get from that is not a replacement for the human organ, the pancreas. That's where the pancreas transplant comes into play in the sense that you can help yourself stay alive just like dialysis helps with kidney transplant, or with failure. A pancreas transplant gives you back the human organ that you actually need. Interviewer: Plus, also a better quality of life. Dr. Paul Campsen: A much better quality of life. Over the long term the pancreas transplant itself is completely correcting the diabetes, so any of the sequelae of diabetes, whether it be peripheral vascular disease, damage to your eyes, damage to your nerves, damage to your coronary arteries, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Can Sometimes Be Reversed With Diet And Common Nutrients

Type 1 Diabetes Can Sometimes Be Reversed With Diet And Common Nutrients

Saving and nurturing cells that make insulin Q: I’m constantly reading about type 2 diabetes treatments. But I have type 1 diabetes. Are there any supplements I can take to prevent type 1 diabetic complications? Dr. Wright: Type 1 diabetes patients are usually surprised to learn that they can use diet and common nutrients to significantly improve their conditions. In fact, they can sometimes even reverse diabetes if caught early. We’ll start with the islet beta cells in the pancreas. These cells produce insulin that transports glucose from the bloodstream to the cells of your body. In Type 1 diabetes, islet cell beta cells (usually just called beta cells) become impaired and die. In recent animal studies, researchers have shown that therapeutic use of an amino acid called GABA may help maintain beta cells and slow, or even reverse, the development of type 1 diabetes. While it’s very likely that GABA in relatively large quantities will have beneficial effects in human type 1 diabetes, complete and permanent reversal of type 1 diabetes in humans also requires strict diet modification, and can be aided by other specific nutrients. The reason beta cells stop working has been traced to an “auto-immune attack” on these cells by lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) and other cells of the immune system. Cow’s milk protein and gluten have been strongly implicated in “triggering” auto-immune attacks on beta cells. Many years ago, Dr. Christopher Reading pioneered the use of dietary changes to treat auto-immune diseases. He found that dairy products, and especially gluten in grain, interfered with nutrient absorption in the intestine. Dr. Reading advised auto-immune disease patients to eliminate all grains and dairy products from their diets permanently. In dif Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 1 - Stem Cells Treatment Clinic

Diabetes Type 1 Stem Cell Treatment Diabetes is currently one of the most widespread diseases, and its prevalence is rapidly growing around the world. It is a common life-long condition and the number of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is increasing. For many, this means living with daily insulin injections and the possibility of long-term health damage. What is type one diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results from T cell autoimmunity mediated destruction of the vast majority of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, the development of new therapies to control T cell autoimmunity and to preserve the remaining β-cell function is of great significance in managing patients with type 1 diabetes. Those diagnosed with T1DM are relying on exogenous insulin. Adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells have been shown in many studies as potential cure for T1DM, which could not only address the need for β-cell replacement but also the regulation of the autoimmune response to cells which produce insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells are able to control T cell autoimmunity. In both forms of diabetes, unless treated, blood sugar will rise uncontrollably, and over time can lead to complications such as cardiovascular, liver and kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), as well as circulatory problems that may require limb amputation, vision loss, blindness (diabetic retinopathy), and nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). How is type one diabetes treated at the moment? People with type 1 diabetes must test their blood sugar levels several times a day and inject insulin when it is needed. Unfortunately, it can still be hard to keep the blood sugar level normal, even with regular injections. Over time, a high level can cause serious damage to the hear Continue reading >>

Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants

Betalin Aims To End Insulin Injections By Treating Type 1 Diabetes With Cell Transplants

Of the 382 million people who have diabetes, only five to 10 percent have Type 1 Diabetes. However, unlike like Type 2 Diabetes, which can be prevented with regular exercise and a healthy diet, Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease that destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Usually diagnosed in childhood, Type 1 Diabetes is traditionally treated with daily insulin injections, and though some prick-less therapies have surfaced, they have not achieved long-term insulin independence. But Israeli biotech startup Betalin Therapeutics may change that, making insulin injections a thing of the past. Functioning as a gatekeeper, insulin is a hormone that enables sugar from consumed food to enter cells in the body. Without insulin, sugar builds up in the bloodstream, where it can cause life-threatening complications. Anyone who has Type 1 Diabetes needs lifelong insulin therapy, administered through daily shots or a pump because insulin typically cannot be taken orally due to interfering stomach enzymes. SEE ALSO: Israelis, Palestinians Join Forces To Explore Local Flowers To Combat Cancer, Diabetes However, the problem with both modes of treatment is that patients must monitor their blood sugar levels and administer the correct dose of insulin throughout the day. And even the most vigilant monitoring doesn’t prevent a sudden spike or drop in blood sugar levels. In other words, patients and doctors can only treat Type 1 Diabetes reactively. Some researchers have been looking for a more proactive and automated approach, namely through transplanting healthy pancreatic islets, the part of the pancreas that contains the insulin-producing “beta” cells, into diabetic patients. An islet transplant protocol developed in 2000 increased insulin-independence rates from Continue reading >>

Letter Of The Week: Experimental Drug Has Cured My Son Of Type 1, Says Rn

Letter Of The Week: Experimental Drug Has Cured My Son Of Type 1, Says Rn

Editor: My son was diagnosed in August 2007 with juvenile diabetes. I am a registered nurse and was devastated by the diagnosis because I was just completely paralyzed by the fear of potential complications. It was also a tremendous shock to be on the other side of health care – receiving information from hurried staff, including doctors, glancing at their watches while I asked one too many questions. I, like the author of one of your articles this month, did a lot of research online and everything else I could read on the subject. Eventually, I found out about a clinical trial by a company called Macrogenics, backed by the JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) of an experimental drug for new onset diabetics that blocks the autoimmune attack. After a tremendous amount of prayer and research, we decided to go ahead: My son took the drug, Teplizumab (MGA031). The drug was given via IV, and he was supposed to take it over 14 days. He only made it to eight before his liver enzymes tripled and he was pulled from the study. His enzymes returned to normal shortly thereafter. I am writing to tell you that my son has not had to use insulin since November 27. Almost four full months insulin-free. No regular, no long-acting – nothing. (He was taking 17 units of Levemir at night and about 10 units of regular a day). We still take his blood sugar at least four times a day and we are careful about carbs (sugar, white flour especially). His last A1c was over two months ago and it was 5.6%. He is still being monitored by Dr. Chayim Newmark (sub-investigator) and goes in for the required study follow-ups. His average blood sugar now is 100. His pediatric endocrinologist is, for some unknown reason, completely uninterested in the results of this study. As I understand it, this Continue reading >>

Dogs Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Dogs Cured Of Type 1 Diabetes

Beagles no longer showed diabetes symptoms following a single course of gene therapy. Gene therapy has successfully banished type 1 diabetes in dogs, the first time this treatment has worked to treat the disease in a large animal, according to a study published online in the journal Diabetes earlier this month (February 1). For the study, Spanish researchers induced diabetes in beagles between 6 months and 1 year old. They then injected the dogs’ skeletal muscles with viruses carrying genes for insulin and glucokinase, an enzyme involved in processing glucose. Following the treatment, the researcher confirmed that the genes had been incorporated into the DNA of the dogs, which were able to regulate their own blood sugar levels without medical help. And when they exercised, they no longer had episodes of hypoglycemia. Dogs that were injected with viruses carrying only the gene for insulin or only the gene for glucokinase continued to have symptoms of diabetes, indicating that the genes acted in concert. Following more tests in dogs, the researchers hope to try out the treatment in humans. But sources warned New Scientist that the treatment might not work the same way in humans that it did in canines, as the dogs’ diabetes was induced by chemically destroying pancreas cells that produce insulin. In naturally occurring type 1 diabetes, on the other hand, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells. Still, “this work is an interesting new avenue which may give us a completely new type of treatment,” Matthew Hobbs, head of research at Diabetes UK, told New Scientist. Continue reading >>

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes To Receive Tests After Coming Off Insulin

British Man With Type 1 Diabetes To Receive Tests After Coming Off Insulin

US doctors are conducting tests on a British man who no longer uses insulin to treat his type 1 diabetes. Daniel Darkes, from Daventy in Northamptonshire, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes seven years ago. But his recent tests have baffled doctors as his pancreas has shown signs of working properly again. Branded 'Miracle Dan' by his friends, the 30-year-old recently travelled to America so doctors could run tests to further understand what had happened to his body. Speaking to the Northampton Chronicle and Echo newspaper, he said: "I had numerous tests, about four or five, to confirm the main reason why my pancreas had started producing insulin again. "One of the tests involved me running on a treadmill. They starved me for a good six hours before, and I spent about 30 minutes running at a constant speed to see if my brain went into a kind of shock mode, or starvation mode, to see if it would send signals down to the organs, i.e. my pancreas, which it did." The doctors also inserted a microchip into his back to measure his protein levels and shone a UV light on his pancreas to detect cells. Doctors think the medical breakthrough might have been caused by a signal sent from his brain to his pancreas. He is also a long-distance runner, which could have contributed to his improved health. Mr Darkes was as surprised as anyone, adding: "You can reverse type 2 diabetes through dieting and exercise, [but type 1 reversal] is not something that happens every day. So, if the pancreas is able to recharge itself in some way then that is a big step." Mr Darkes says that doctors are now 80 per cent convinced he is cured of the condition, which has never before been reversed. The findings from Mr Darkes' test results are set to be published next week and it is hoped they will help f Continue reading >>

Doctors Now ‘80% Certain’ Brit Is The First Person Ever To Cure Himself Of Type 1 Diabetes

Doctors Now ‘80% Certain’ Brit Is The First Person Ever To Cure Himself Of Type 1 Diabetes

Tests show a man may well hold the secret to a cure for an illness that kills 1.5 million people every year. Daniel Darkes, a diabetic for the past seven years, had ceased taking his insulin injections after his blood sugar levels returned to below average/average to low levels, suggesting that his pancreas had started functioning again. Daniel has since travelled to the United States last week where doctors in St Louis, Missouri, performed numerous tests in an effort to ascertain what had happened. And a first round of tests seem to suggest that his diabetes has indeed disappeared, with scientists putting the probability of his potentially miraculous recovery being genuine at 80 per cent. Daniel, who has been branded ‘Miracle Dan’ by his friends said: “I had numerous tests, about four or five, to confirm the main reason why my pancreas had started producing insulin again. “One of the tests involved me running on a treadmill. They starved me for a good six hours before, and I spent about 30 minutes running at a constant speed to see if my brain went into a kind of shock mode, or starvation mode, to see if it would send signals down to the organs, i.e. my pancreas, which it did.” Other tests included the insertion of a microchip into Daniel’s lower back to measure his protein levels, and shining of a UV light to detect cells in his pancreas, which scientists found. The tests could hold the key to finding a cure for the disease in the future, and it is hoped Daniel’s trip to America could be looked back on in years to come as the first step. About 1.5 million people die of all types of diabetes each year and it drastically affects the lives of millions more every day. It is thought that the reason behind Daniel’s apparent recovery is a specific signal sent Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is the type of diabetes that typically develops in children and in young adults. In type 1 diabetes the body stops making insulin and the blood sugar (glucose) level goes very high. Treatment to control the blood glucose level is with insulin injections and a healthy diet. Other treatments aim to reduce the risk of complications. They include reducing blood pressure if it is high and advice to lead a healthy lifestyle. What is type 1 diabetes? What is type 1 diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. Diabetes mellitus (just called diabetes from now on) occurs when the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood becomes higher than normal. There are two main types of diabetes. These are called type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes usually first develops in children or young adults. In the UK about 1 in 300 people develop type 1 diabetes at some stage. With type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Type 2 Diabetes And The Diet That Cured Me

Why me? At 59 I was 10st 7lb, 5ft 7in, and had never been overweight. I ran and played cricket regularly and didn't drink alcohol excessively. Yet at a routine check-up I was told that I had type 2 diabetes. In 10 years I could be dependent on insulin, it could affect my sight, feet, ears, heart and I had a 36% greater chance of dying early. In type 1 diabetes, the body produces none of the insulin that regulates our blood sugar levels. Very high glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Patients with type 2 diabetes, however, do produce insulin - just not enough to keep their glucose levels normal. Because I was fit and not overweight (obesity is a major risk factor in type 2 diabetes; however, a number of non-obese people, particularly members of south Asian communities, are also prone to it), my doctor told me I could control my condition with diet alone. Desperate for information, I headed to the web, where I found a report about a research trial at Newcastle University led by Professor Roy Taylor. His research suggested type 2 diabetes could be reversed by following a daily 800-calorie diet for eight weeks. When our bodies are deprived of normal amounts of food they consume their own fat reserves, with the fat inside organs used up first. The idea of Taylor's diet is to use up the fat that is clogging up the pancreas and preventing it from creating insulin, until normal glucose levels return. With my GP's blessing and a home glucose-testing kit, I began my experiment. The diet was strict: three litres of water a day, three 200-calorie food supplements (soups and shakes) and 200 calories of green vegetables. Thanks to my doctor's dietary guidance, and running three times a week, I had already lost a stone. Yet my glucose levels were still above 6mmol/L (millimols Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs. Type 1 Diabetes

Paleo Vs. Type 1 Diabetes

I received the following email today, pretty cool stuff: Robb, I emailed you about a month or so ago. I just want to give you an update on my situation: I’ve lost about 15-20lbs. I’ve taken no insulin for 5 weeks and I’m type 1 Diabetic!. Because of my strict paleo diet(gluten and dairy free) my a1c is not going to be much higher than when I was taking crap load of insulin. My glucose has really stabilized in the low 100s (100-125) and I haven’t had a low at all during this time nor have I had extreme highs like when I was taking so much insulin. My blood pressure has dropped tremendously and my Internist thinks that my pancreas has jumped started again, because even when I have had a cheat meal my blood is responding in a completely different manner. We are going to do a c-peptide test again. I’ve also started to incorporate better sleeping patterns (trying to get 9-10 hours) and my fasting glucose is even better (lower) than before. It is well understood that Type 1 Diabetes is a failure of the beta cells of the pancreas to produce insulin. This is generally acknowledged to be the result of an autoimmune response, usually attributed to a viral infection or some kind of trauma. What is less known is the role of grain lectins in this process. Many people benefit not only from reducing the recommended American Diabetes Association 60% carb diet (higher even than the diet that causes most of the type 2 diabetes we see) because of a more fat fueled metabolism but also, occasionally, we see a return of normal pancreatic function with the removal of the neo-lithic foods. The inflammation and immune response that has been beating down the beta cells cease, some repair occurs and things come back to normal. This is not the norm unfortunately, but it does happen. Even Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious disease, which, if not controlled, can be life threatening. It is often associated with long-term complications that can affect every system and part of the body. Diabetes can contribute to eye disorders and blindness, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation, and nerve damage. It can affect pregnancy and cause birth defects, as well Type 1 diabetes is caused by a loss or malfunction of the insulin producing cells, called pancreatic beta cells. Damage to beta cells results in an absence or insufficient production of insulin produced by the body. Type 1 diabetes an autoimmune disease in which the body views the beta cells (insulin producing cells found in the islets of the pancreas) as a foreign substance, so the patient's immune system attacks the islets and kills them. Since insulin is necessary to sustain life, the missing insulin has to be replaced. The replacement insulin is administered by injection using a syringe or an insulin pump, which delivers the insulin under the skin. It is estimated that 5-10% of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Most people with type 1 diabetes do not have a family history of the disease. We do not know how to prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes. Treatments for Type 1 Diabetes Intensive Insulin Therapy There are many different insulins for many different situations and lifestyles, and there are more than 20 types of insulin sold in the United States. These insulins differ in how they are made, how they work in the body, and price. A molecule that is identical to human insulin can be manufactured. In addition, insulin can be obtained from pigs, as people will respond to pig insulin. Future availability of animal insulin is uncertain. Insulin may be taken by means of a shot (oft Continue reading >>

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