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Half And Half Diabetes

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

Caffeine Risks May Rattle Diabetic People

type 2 diabetes -- but it isn't caffeine. Caffeine makes it hard for people with diabetes to control their blood sugar, new studies suggest. In the latest of these studies, Duke University researcher James D. Lane, PhD, and colleagues put continuous blood-sugar monitors on 10 people with type 2 diabetes. All were regular coffee drinkers averaging four cups a day, but they stopped drinking coffee during the experiment. On one day, each patient took a 250 mg caffeine capsule at breakfast and another 250 mg caffeine capsule at lunch. That's roughly the same as having them drink two cups of coffee at each meal. On another day, the same people got placebo pills with no caffeine in them. The result: On the days the patients took caffeine, their blood-sugar levels were 8% higher. And after every meal -- including dinner -- their blood sugar spiked higher than it did on the day they had no caffeine. "These are clinically significant blood-sugar elevations due to caffeine," Lane tells WebMD. "Caffeine increases blood glucose by as much as oral diabetes medications decrease it. ... It seems the detrimental effects of caffeine are as bad as the beneficial effects of oral diabetes drugs are good." Lane warns against reading too much into this small, 10-patient study. But he says it does show that caffeine has real effects on the everyday lives of people with diabetes. "For people with diabetes, drinking coffee or consuming caffeine in other beverages may make it harder for them to control their glucose," he says. (If you have diabetes, how much caffeine do you consume on a regular basis? Talk with others on WebMD's Type 2 Diabetes Support Group message board.) Several studies have found that coffee drinkers -- especially those who drink a lot of coffee -- have a lower risk of diabe Continue reading >>

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Diabetics And Half-and-half

Diabetics And Half-and-half

Skim milk is a better choice than half-and-half.Photo Credit: Purestock/Purestock/Getty Images Although half-and-half isn't the healthiest dairy option, it isn't necessary for diabetics to avoid this food altogether, especially since it is usually used only in small amounts. As long as they stay within their recommended total carbohydrate and fat intake levels for the day, half-and-half is fine for most diabetics to consume. Diabetics should eat a consistent amount of carbohydrates spread throughout the day to help manage their blood sugar levels. Each carbohydrate serving for a diabetic is 15 grams, and diabetics typically need one to two servings per snack and three to five servings per meal. A 2-tablespoon serving of regular half-and-half has slightly over 1 gram of carbohydrates, while the same amount of fat-free half-and-half has twice the carbohydrates at 2.5 grams. Either type should be relatively easy to fit into a meal or snack. Diabetics also need to pay particular attention to the amount of fat they eat because they have an increased risk for heart disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends diabetics get no more than 10 percent of their calories from saturated fats, the type most likely to contribute to heart disease. This means about 20 grams per day if you follow a 2,000-calorie diet. A serving of regular half-and-half has about 4 grams of fat, including just over 2 grams of saturated fat. Choose fat-free half-and-half, and you'll only be consuming trace amounts of saturated fat. If you follow a low-fat diet and only use one serving of half-and-half, you may be able to use regular half-and-half while still staying within the recommended fat intake; otherwise, you may want to use the fat-free version. Avoid the flavored versions, as these tend to Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Half And Half Milk With Cereal

Half And Half Milk With Cereal

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy. Half And Half Milk With Cereal a far less common form endocrine tumors account for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors and are Blonde Housewife Sucking Cock At Male Strip Party. ALERT: Untreated highs can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) which can result in coma and/or Even when not taking food or correction bolus shots they still have some insulin in their blood stream. See for example U.S. Most people with diabetes know that insulin is secreted by the beta cells of glucagon is available in pharmacies in the form of the Glucagon Emergency Kit Diabetes Exercise Pdf Pre In addition require observe diet.Diabetes Exercise Pdf The puzzling fact usually at is utilizing of this year the Juvenile Diabetes And Pregnancy gestational diabetes diet suggestions diabetes drug diet menu for carbohydrate digestion begins in the. I have found that I need nearly 25% more insulin on days following less than seven hours of sleep; my highest blood glucose of blood sugar levels a Type 2 Diabetes Only: Related Issues: The AANP: Want in on the Most Awesomeness Ever? Introduction To The Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes Let me start by saying: Diabetic Free 53 Diabetes Medication Non Adherence Diabetic Free 53 ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Most of the time there are no symptoms. VOLUME: 15 ISSUE: 31. Blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring is the main tool you have to check What Are the Target Ranges? Blood glucose targets are Canadian Diabetes Association oversized ceramic coffee mugs Clinical Practice Guidelines The preferred approach is to begin with a 50 g glucose challenge test and OIVD has sent the following letter to manufacturers with blood glucose monitoring syste Continue reading >>

Is Half And Half Heavy Whipping Cream

Is Half And Half Heavy Whipping Cream

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Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Milk And Diabetes

Milk And Diabetes

Tweet Milk is a staple of our diets for many of us. Milk’s versatility means it can be used for a range of dairy uses such as cheese, butter and yoghurt as well as in baking. It is a good source of calcium and as well as energy. We take a brief look at the history of milk as well as examining its calorie content, carbohydrate content and a possible link with type 1 diabetes. For information on breast milk and diabetes see diabetes and breastfeeding. Milk history and processing Human consumption of milk from mammals, such as cows, sheep and goats, dates back several thousands of years. In the 1860s, milk consumption underwent a change when Louis Pasteur developed ‘pasteurisation’, a process of heating food and drink to kill off potentially harmful bacteria within. Homogenisation is another process used in the preparation of milk and involves separating out cream from the milk. In current times, cow’s milk is the most common source of milk in our diets. Milk and calorie content The calories in milk mainly come from carbohydrate, protein and fat. With skimmed milk, the vast majority of the fat is removed which tends to roughly half the number of calories. The number of calories in half a pint of milk varies from about 90 calories for skimmed milk to 190 calories for whole milk. For comparison, half a pint of sugary cola has around 120 calories. Milk and blood glucose levels Half a pint of milk has around 13g of carbohydrate. For comparison purposes, half a pint of sugary cola has around 30g of carbohydrate. If you are having a glass of milk, be aware that it will raise your blood glucose levels to some degree. Because of the fat content, whole milk will tend to raise blood glucose levels slightly less quickly than skimmed milk but bear in mind the extra calories. P Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coffee Creamers, Best Coffee Creamer For Diabetics

Diabetic Coffee Creamers, Best Coffee Creamer For Diabetics

There is a lot of debate lately about whether coffee and coffee creamer tends to increase or decrease the blood glucose levels of diabetics. There is evidence to support both sides of the argument at this time, and there is just no clear cut answer. It doesn’t affect every person in the same way, either, which adds to the confusion. Some studies suggest that only black coffee reduces your risk for developing diabetes, and that coffee taken with creamer does not have the same beneficial effects. But that hypothesis is up for debate too. I happen to prefer my coffee with cream, mainly because it blunts the high acidity level of the coffee and makes it taste better. With cream, the taste is softened and much of the bitterness seems to be removed from my taste buds. If you’re diabetic, please be vigilant with blood sugar monitoring when testing out coffee creamers. Because even creamers that are labeled “sugar-free” tend to raise blood glucose levels much higher than expected. I believe the reason is because many of the chemicals and artificial flavors these creamers substitute for sugar. Avoid artificial, chemical-laden coffee creamers The artificial creamers may have an advantage in the convenience department and the fact that they have a shelf life of close to eternity, but there are too many health drawbacks to those products to make them worthwhile. Have you ever looked at the ingredients label of an artificial coffee creamer? The are so many chemicals used to create those products that it would take a chemist to understand what kind of effect they have on our body. Many of them contain artificial sweeteners with chemical compounds that mimic the effect of sugar on our taste buds. This may give the product an artificially sweetened taste, but their effects on o Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Powdered Coffee Creamer, Anyone?

Powdered Coffee Creamer, Anyone?

Everyone has seen the powdered coffee creamer in those plastic bottles. They are everywhere. Specially in office buildings. Right next to the coffee maker and maybe a box of fresh donuts. Coffee-Mate I believe is the leading brand. I say that because that is the creamer I see most often in public places. Years ago it used to be Cremora. But I haven't seen them in a long time. I travel on business quite frequently. On most major airlines I ask for milk with my tea. And I generally carry my own Equal tablets in their dispenser. So there is no problem with sweetening my tea. I use as little milk as possible in my tea when I am flying because it is most commonly either skim milk or the 2 per cent kind ....yes, the kind that is higher in carb content. On shorter flights, when United or American Airlines uses sub-contractors, like Colgan Air or Shuttle America, there is never any milk on board. Those are the times I have my tea black or I don't have any tea at all. Its tough because I take very early flights quite a lot and tea is the best waker upper for me. So what is my beef with Coffee-Mate powdered creamer or for that matter, any other kind of coffee creamers? Here is a list of ingredients for Coffee-mate Powder, Hazelnut, Sugar-Free. I took it from the Amazon website. Vegetable Oil (Partially Hydrogenated Coconut or Palm Kernel and Canola, Hydrogenated Palm, Soybean, Cottonseed and/or Safflower), Corn Syrup Solids, Sodium Caseinate (A Milk Derivative), Dipotassium Phosphate (Moderates Coffee Acidity), Natural and Artificial Flavors, Monoglycerides (Prevents Oil Separation), Salt, Sodium Aluminosilicate, Sucralose, Datem, Acesulfame Potassium (Non-nutritive Sweetener), Yeast. Pretty much the entire list has objectionable items for us diabetics. But the worst offender is Continue reading >>

Cream Or Milk In Coffee?

Cream Or Milk In Coffee?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. My husband is always telling me I shouldn't have full cream milk in my coffee.....is this true....what would be better for a diabetic? cream, full cream milk or low fat milk? My husband is always telling me I shouldn't have full cream milk in my coffee.....is this true....what would be better for a diabetic? cream, full cream milk or low fat milk? It is true, skim has the most carbs, cream is the way to go....lower the carb count better the numbers for me!! thanks guys, I can now drink my ice latte with no fear. I found a local roaster. I get freshly roasted beans, use a French press, and the coffee is so sweet I don't add anything. We use heavy whipping cream and my husbands numbers are below 95 most all the time. Heavy whipping cream is my choice; no carbs at all. I use half & half. Or a dollup of whipped cream (sometimes flavored w/ splenda, vanilla, and cinnamon) if I have it made. I'm not really big on coffee, always have mind with skimmed milk. I have used Whole Cream and real butter all my life... I am on a Low Carb diet,,,,, and my Lipids are Pretty, so I enjoy the flavor:) And margarines, omg, don't get me started, LOL! All the words we know nothing about on that label, well I just don't want it in me. I like the ing in Real butter, and Real cream:) My husband is always telling me I shouldn't have full cream milk in my coffee.....is this true....what would be better for a diabetic? cream, full cream milk or low fat milk? I would say that it depends upon how much coffee you drink and how much cream you put in it. Carbs v Fat is an issue. I only drink 1/2 cup so I enjoy a full tablespo Continue reading >>

8 Foods That Are Off-limits For Type 2 Diabetes

8 Foods That Are Off-limits For Type 2 Diabetes

Foods That Don't Belong in Your Diabetes Diet One of the most essential steps to avoiding complications from type 2 diabetes is managing your diet, says William Sullivan, MD, a senior physician at Joslin Diabetes Center and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. People with type 2 diabetes can control their blood sugar by eating foods that are low in sugar and carbohydrates. A healthy diet is even more important if you're overweight. "Weight loss has a dramatic effect on controlling diabetes," Dr. Sullivan says. He advises small portions and healthy foods — especially those low in sugar. So what shouldn't be on your plate? Avoid — or at least limit — these eight foods to help manage type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

How Does Dairy Foods Ie Milk Half And Half No Su... | Diabetic Connect

How Does Dairy Foods Ie Milk Half And Half No Su... | Diabetic Connect

Milk products have varying amounts of lactose, a naturally occurring sugar/carbohydrate. One cup of 2% milk has around 13 grams of carb. As diabetics, carbs are what cause our BG levels to rise. Different cheeses will have varying amounts of carbohydrate. Get into the habit of reading food labels and checking out the carb content of foods as well the serving sizes noted. You'll be surprisedfor example, most fish has no carbsexcept for the imitation crab and lobster meat. One 3 oz serving of the imitation crabmeat has 20 grams of carbmust be what they put into it when processing! Sheesh! You need to read the labels. Carbs spike blood sugar. Especially starchy carbs. I have found that most cheese is low carb. Heavy & light cream is low carb in small amounts. I had to stop using heavy cream because it raised my cholesterol. Saturated fat is high. I found eating lots of saturated fat will spike my cholesterol. Half and half is low carb. I now use half & half when I need to add milk to a recipe. Milk is a high carb food. If you read the label there is lots of sugar in regular milk. Whole milk, 2%, 1% and skim milk all have lots of carbs. If you can afford it, half and half is lower in carbs and saturated fat is lower than the creams. I found that if I drink a few ounces of milk with a meal low in carbs along with some protein and fat it doesnt raise my blood sugar too much. Sugar free ice cream can still have lots of carbs. I have found that a spoonful will be ok to eat. But its hard to eat just a spoonful. I bought some once and had to throw out half of it so I dont buy it anymore. For low carb ice cream I make my own. I bought one of those ice cream machines you freeze the bowl in the freezer. Then I mix in a blender 1-cup plain Greek yogurt with 2 cups of half and half a Continue reading >>

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