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Hair Products For Diabetics

Hair - A Yardstick For Diabetes

Hair - A Yardstick For Diabetes

Sir, Hair of a person may represent an easily accessible and non- invasive tissue for the study of hyperglycemia. Assessing the amount of glycation in hair apart from being readily acceptable to the patients provides fairly accurate and reliable information regarding the degree, the duration of hyperglycemia, and the associated microvascular complications. Unlike glycosylated hemoglobin that mirrors glycemic control preceding 8 to 12 weeks, analysis of hair-glycation can help one to monitor the diabetic's metabolic balance for longer time periods. A study showed a significant correlation between glycosylation of the proximal 4 cm of hair (representing 16 weeks at an assumed average rate of hair growth of 0.37 mm/day) and the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c).[1] The level of glycosylation of hair is known to be independent of duration of the disease, age, sex, and race of the patient and color of the hair. Being stable along the length of the hair from scalp to tip, a sufficiently long hair sample enables us to record a long term record of degree of hyperglycemia. Hair samples of 12 cm long may correspond to about one year's tissue glycosylation and diabetic microvascular complications. A novel dot-block immunochemical assay of hair of diabetics showed significant correlations in amounts of blood glucose (BG) vs. HbA1c, BG vs. early glycation products (EGAs) and HbA1c vs. EGAs. In the same study, type1 diabetics of acute onset displayed nearly similar EGAs levels in their proximal 0-9 cm hair as did type1 diabetics with long-established diabetes. This reinforces the notion of long and insidious etiology of type 1 diabetes.[2] Proteic sulphur levels and furosine in the hair diabetics also closely correlate with HbA1c. Significant rate of hair loss may reflect impaired glyc Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss?

Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss?

What diabetes can do to your body If you have diabetes, your body doesn’t produce insulin, doesn’t use it effectively, or both. Insulin is a hormone that moves the sugar from the foods you eat from your bloodstream into your cells to be stored or used as energy. When you don’t have insulin or it isn’t used effectively, sugar can build up in your blood. That excess sugar can damage organs all over your body, including your eyes, nerves, and kidneys. It can also damage your blood vessels. These vessels carry oxygen around your body to nourish organs and tissues. Damaged blood vessels may not be able to deliver enough oxygen to nourish your hair follicles. This lack of oxygen can affect your normal hair growth cycle. Hair usually goes through three phases. During the active growing phase, which lasts for two years or more, hairs grow at a rate of 1 to 2 cm per month. Hair then goes into a resting phase, which lasts for about 100 days. After this phase, some of the resting hair falls out. Diabetes can interrupt this process, slowing down your hair growth. Having diabetes can also cause you to lose more hair than usual. That hair loss isn’t only on your head. You can lose hairs on your arms, legs, and other body parts, too. When hair regrows, it does so at a slower-than-normal rate. People with diabetes are more likely to have a condition called alopecia areata. With alopecia, the immune system attacks the hair follicles, leading to patches of hair loss on the head and on other parts of the body. Diabetes itself can lead to hair loss. You may also lose hair as a side effect of stress from living with a chronic illness, or from medicines you take to treat your diabetes. Some people with diabetes also have thyroid disease, which can contribute to hair loss. Speak wit Continue reading >>

Hair Follicle Characteristics As Early Marker Of Type 2 Diabetes

Hair Follicle Characteristics As Early Marker Of Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM2) is a continuum of metabolic disorders characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin action (1). Today, DM2 is the most common endocrine disorder and one of the major causes of worldwide mortality (2) and disability adjusted life-years (3). As the disease progresses, hyperglycemia injures target cells through multiple pathways, including the effects of aldose reductase, advanced glycation end products, polyol accumulation, oxidative stress, protein kinase C isoforms, growth factors, and atherosclerosis. Endothelial cell damage leads to vascular impairment, which in turn decreases oxygen and nutrients in virtually all organs (1), causing a variety of chronic complications that are responsible for the majority of DM2-related morbidity and mortality (4, 5). These are classified by the diameter of the impaired arteries in macrovascular complications —including coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke— and microvascular complications —including diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy (6, 7). The current DM2 diagnosis is based on epidemiological studies that showed a higher risk of the development of retinopathy up to eight years after certain biological thresholds are exceeded (8). The current American Diabetes Association (ADA) thresholds are A1C ≥ 6.5%, fasting plasma glucose ≥ 126 mg/dL, 2-h plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL during an oral glucose tolerance test, and random plasma glucose ≥ 200 mg/dL in patients with classic symptoms of hyperglycemia or hyperglycemic crisis (9). Currently, an important goal in DM2 care is to minimize organ damage by preventing DM2 onset, so a precursor condition called prediabetes was created for people with greater risk of develo Continue reading >>

Hair Beauty Tips For Diabetics

Hair Beauty Tips For Diabetics

According to research studies, by the age of 35, two-thirds of men will have some degree of hair loss by age 50, about 85% of men will have significant thinning of their hair.Hair loss is prevalent in women, too — they make up 40% of hair-loss sufferers. Thanks to society’s pressure to be attractive, hair loss can have a major negative effect on quality of life. Hair loss can be devastating, leading to loss of confidence, poor self-image, and even depression. There are many causes of hair loss, including thyroid issues, hormonal changes, scalp infections, certain medications, chemotherapy, and radiation. However, one cause of hair loss that is related specifically to Type 1 diabetes is called alopecia areata. This condition is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks hair follicles, leading to patches of hair loss on the scalp and on other parts of the body. Alopecia areata may have a hereditary component, too, and often occurs in families where members have other autoimmune diseases, including Type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, lupus, or Addison’s disease. There is no cure for alopecia areata, nor is there a specific medicine used to treat it. However, medications used for other conditions might be helpful in promoting hair regrowth. For the most part, hair loss can be dealt with, but it’s important that you know the cause. In some cases, hair loss is permanent. And, as in the case of alopecia areata, hair may grow back all on its own. There are other causes of hair loss linked to diabetes that could be an issue here, too. For instance, diabetes can affect your circulatory system, making it less effective. As certain nutrients and proteins are essential for hair growth, a decrease in the amount of these reaching hair follicl Continue reading >>

Thinning Hair | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Thinning Hair | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I was diagnosed 15 months ago, but started on metformin in January of this year. Commenced with one tablet, now it's 2. A few days ago I noticed with a start how thin my hair has become. When I used to bunch it into a ponytail it was quite substantial, now the pony tail is very slender. The internet confirms that some people do experience thinning of hair, others dont. Apparently the package leaflet used to include this side effect but at some stage dropped it. However, I spoke to Bristol Labs today and they went thru all their package inserts for metformin going back to 2008 and cannot find a reference to thinning hair at all. Anyone experience thinning? Does it slow down or stop at some stage? Hi Cindy, hair loss can have many causes, high blood glucose among them. Do you have a BG meter and test? If not, get one. The Codefree is popular as the test strips are cheap. Anaemia, B12 deficiency and low thyroid hormones are other common causes for hair loss. Ask your GP for prints of test results and post them here, with ranges, and you'll get help as far as we can give it. TorqPenderloin Type 1 Well-Known Member Have your glucose levels been under control for several months now? The reason I ask is because many people, like me, experienced thinning hair (or even hair loss) in the months leading up to their diagnosis and even some time after getting their glucose levels back to normal. I was diagnosed (albeit with type 1) a little less than 2 months ago. Since then, my glucose levels have been near perfect, but only recently have I noticed my hair starting to thicken up again. Another cause of hair loss in women can be due to lack of protein. I used to h Continue reading >>

Can I Use Hair Loss Treatments If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Use Hair Loss Treatments If I Have Diabetes?

Name: Varsha Sharma Question: I am a 33 year old diabetic, who has had diabetes for the last six years. I was initially on insulin but after four years I switched to oral hypoglycaemics. Recently my blood glucose levels were high and my endocrino has had to try several permutations of drugs. Now my blood sugar is settled, with recent Hb A1 C well below 6. I am on 500mg metformin, voglibose and vildagliptin, which I am taking twice a day, that makes 1000mg metformin/day along with LANTUS insulin shot, 8 units at night time. I am a post grad student. My daily routine does not allow me time for exercise. I was having severe hair loss at the time of my diabetes diagnosis, which has continued and now my hair is very thin. Kindly guide me as to how can I regrow my hair. Will it ever regrow? Answer: Hair loss is known to affect diabetics, and thinning hair can also be a warning sign of diabetes in those who have not yet been diagnosed. Diabetes occurs because the body can’t use glucose (blood sugar) properly, either owing to a lack of the hormone insulin (Type 1 diabetes), or because the insulin available doesn’t work effectively (Type 2 diabetes). This places the body under immense physical stress and can have adverse effects on diabetics’ hair growth cycles. Hair loss conditions such as diffuse hair loss and telogen effluvium can both be caused as a result, but they usually clear up once the diabetes is being properly managed. If your hair loss is caused solely by diabetes it may be temporary and could grow back once your condition is under control, however, as you were diagnosed six years ago, this is unlikely to be the case. The first step is finding out exactly what is causing your hair to thin and whether it is related to your diabetes or if it is due to another co Continue reading >>

How To Treat Hair Loss From Diabetes

How To Treat Hair Loss From Diabetes

If you’re a diabetic affected by hair loss, the first step to finding a solution is determining what type of hair loss you have. It may well be that the loss is temporary: a reaction to the strain that untreated diabetes can put on the body. If this is the case, you’re probably dealing with diffuse hair loss or telogen effluvium. In both cases, hair should regrow naturally once you begin to control your diabetes through insulin injections or medication. You Are What You Eat There are other causes of hair loss linked to diabetes that could be an issue here, too. For instance, diabetes can affect your circulatory system, making it less effective. As certain nutrients and proteins are essential for hair growth, a decrease in the amount of these reaching hair follicles could result in weaker and slower hair growth. A simple way to remedy this is to start taking a nutritional supplement which does not have a sugar coating. This will ensure the body is getting a consistent level of nutrients in case diet alone does not provide a sufficient amount. If you’re feeling unwell or have other unexplained symptoms alongside your hair loss, you may be suffering from an infection, as diabetes can affect your immune system when the blood contains excess sugar. An infection can disrupt the hair growth cycle, causing hairs to go into their resting phase prematurely, leaving you with weaker hair. In It For The Long Haul If your diabetes is under control and you’re still losing more hair than usual, it could be that you’re experiencing pattern baldness. This condition is a result of genetics, and is not caused by diabetes, and as such it cannot be ‘cured,’ and requires treatment to prevent increased hair loss. It might be that diabetes related hair loss has masked the onset of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hair Loss: Restoring Your Hair To Health

Diabetes And Hair Loss: Restoring Your Hair To Health

Diabetes and hair loss can unfortunately go hand-in-hand. Diabetes is a hormone-related disease, and hair is notoriously sensitive to hormonal disruption. Just ask any man with testosterone sensitivity and resulting male pattern baldness. For undiagnosed diabetics, sudden hair loss or thinning can be a tell-tale symptom of the disease. Diabetes-related hair loss (called telogen effluvium) is a reaction to the metabolic and hormonal stress your body undergoes when your pancreas stops producing insulin. Hair loss can also occur when insulin treatment begins (which, although beneficial, is still a change from the status quo, and perceived as stressful by the body). As a result of this stress, sometimes your hair simply stops growing. Thinning usually first becomes noticeable when the new hairs start growing in and displace the dead hair. Once your insulin levels balance, your hair will start to normalize, but it can take a while, and it may re-grow at a slower rate than you’d ideally like. Diabetics are also susceptible to skin ailments; circulatory problems associated with the disease can impede healing of infections and wounds. If the skin on the scalp is compromised, hair growth can suffer. So what can you do to encourage your hair to grow back faster? Control your diabetes and eat a healthy diet. Maintaining a consistent blood sugar level will reduce overall stress on your body and result in faster hair growth. Be nice to your hair. Use a gentle shampoo, preferably a natural product without any added chemicals. Don’t torture your hair with heat appliances. Let your hair dry naturally, or at least use the cool setting on your hairdryer. Avoid harsh treatments like perms, dyes, and chemical straighteners. Try using emu oil as a hair treatment. Emu oil has rejuvenatin Continue reading >>

Diabet-x Hair And Scalp Therapy Shampoo 16oz

Diabet-x Hair And Scalp Therapy Shampoo 16oz

Rich nutrients treat extra dry scalp, while leaving locks luxuriously vibrant and manageable. Natural Humectants and Vitamin B-12 re-hydrate hair and scalp dried by diabetes complications, or by exposure to styling and the environment Botanicals Chamomile, Henna and Aloe Vera and Vitamin E soothe and treat dry irritated scalp Wheat Protein revitalizes tired, limp hair- lifting hair by adding volume and body Vegetable Derivatives repair and correct damaged hair and skin Scientifically designed to deeply moisturize and nourish extremely dry hair without leaving an oily and greasy residue. Diabet-X Hair and Scalp Therapy Shampoo is designed for people with extremely damaged, dry, and over-stressed hair. Special cleansing agentslift dirt and oil without drying the scalp Botanicalsrehydrates and replenishes scalp. Revitalizes and Enhanceshair, revealing shiny and radiant highlights Directions:Wet hair, lather, and massage gently into scalp. Rinse thoroughly. For balanced results use Diabet-X Hair and Scalp Therapy Conditioner. I have diabetes and a couple other health problems plus I am 73 years old. I bought the shampoo and conditioner to take to my hairdresser. My hair stays nice, full and lots of body for nearly a week. This is great stuff, I have recommended it to friends that have diabetes. Reviewed by:Claudia Mouery from someset co, md. on 2/3/2015 This is the best shampoo I have found to soothe my itchy scalp. My skin and scalp need special care due to diabetes and sensitive skin. It works better for me than prescription shampoo and is much more gentle. i have been using it for several years now and will continue. Works excellent on hair and scalp. I've tried several products but this is the best for dry scalp and hair. Reviewed by:Yolanda Martinez from Fontana, CA. Continue reading >>

Hair Loss In A Female Patient With Diabetes: What's The Cause?

Hair Loss In A Female Patient With Diabetes: What's The Cause?

This article originally appeared on Clinical Advisor. Mrs. S was a 55-year-old female who had been on metformin for more than 10 years to manage her type 2 diabetes. When she came into the office for a routine follow-up visit, she complained her hair had been falling out. She stated the drain in her tub was full of hair after each shower and said every time she brushed her hair, the bristles were full. Mrs. S reported that at first she thought her hair loss might be a symptom of menopause , since her last menstrual period was more than two years ago. She had been on a daily regimen of combination estrogen and progesterone and said that though she felt generally well, she has mild fatigue most days. She denied hot flashes or night sweats and said she sleeps through the night. Mrs. S has had a modest weight gain since her last visit, and her current BMI was 28. Her blood pressure was normal and maintained on a low dose of an ACE inhibitor. She has been on statin therapy for hyperlipidemia for eight years and has tolerated the medication well. She denied using any supplements or herbal compounds. She does not use tobacco and, to the best of her stated knowledge, had not been around any unusual chemical exposures or other environmental toxicities. Mrs. S appeared well when she walked into the clinic. She was alert and oriented, smiled and gave quick responses to questions. Her vital signs were normal: BP of 126/84mmHg, pulse rate 87, respiratory rate 16 and unlabored, temperature 98.3 F and pulse oxygenation 99% on room air. Heart sounds were regular sinus rhythm without a murmur. Lungs were clear to auscultation bilaterally. Pupils were equal, round and reactive to light. Cranial nerves were intact to gross examination. Gait was normal. Her skin was warm and dry without a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss

Diabetes Hair Loss

There is a definite connection between diabetes and hair loss. Some women are not even aware that they have the condition and a loss of hair can be one of the first signs. On this page I'll take a look at the symptoms of diabetes, why it causes hair loss, and what to do if it's affecting you. NOTE: This information is provided for guidance purposes only and should not be seen as medical advice. You should always discuss ANY concerns about your health with a qualified medical professional. Could Your Hair Loss Be a Sign of Diabetes? According to recent statistics, 24% of diabetes cases go undiagnosed. Data from the National Diabetes Statistics Report 2014 shows that there are 29.1 million Americans with diabetes - but only 21 million people are aware of it. There are lots of different reasons that diabetes causes hair loss, which I will cover later in this article. But it's also worth knowing that thinning hair can also indicate two other related conditions - insulin resistance pre-diabetes Insulin resistance is a precursor to pre-diabetes and BOTH conditions are precursors to type 2 diabetes. More About Insulin Resistance and Pre-Diabetes When insulin levels in the body remain sufficiently high over an extended period of time, the body's sensitivity to the hormone begins to decline. This is called insulin resistance. A difficult condition to reverse, insulin resistance causes symptoms that include high blood pressure, lethargy and hunger. It's a 'vicious circle', because the increased insulin levels and weight gain make the insulin resistance even worse. Eventually it can develop into pre-diabetes, which doctors can identify by increased glucose levels in the blood. Research supports the fact that women with insulin resistance are at risk of hair loss - so it's certainl Continue reading >>

4 Neoteric Diabetic Skin Care Shampoo Scalp Care 12 Fl Oz Each Mm3004

4 Neoteric Diabetic Skin Care Shampoo Scalp Care 12 Fl Oz Each Mm3004

4 Neoteric Diabetic Skin Care Shampoo Scalp Care 12 FL Oz Each Mm3004 The lowest-priced brand-new, unused, unopened, undamaged item in its original packaging (where packaging is applicable).Packaging should be the same as what is found in a retail store, unless the item is handmade or was packaged by the manufacturer in non-retail packaging, such as an unprinted box or plastic bag.See details for additional description. Get it by Thursday, Apr 5 from Troy, Pennsylvania Sold by colossalfinds ( 6099 )99.8% Positive feedback Contains Vitamins, Paraben-Free, Perfume-Free, Contains Minerals, Phosphate-Free, Cruelty-free/No Animal Testing I have used this product for years. Love it. So thankful I could find it online since it was no longer available locally. Thank you. Love the smoothness and thorough cleaning of my hair and scalp. This is the second Neoteric product I use. I love this shampoo. As a diabetic, my scalp is very dry and itchy. This shampoo helps with the dryness and the itching. It also leaves my hair manageable and clean. I recommend it to any diabetic or anyone with a dry scalp Continue reading >>

Diabetes Hair Loss: Why It Happens And What You Can Do

Diabetes Hair Loss: Why It Happens And What You Can Do

Diabetes hair loss is not a new concept. Diabetes can have many adverse affects on the body, including hair loss or thinning hair. The majority of the time the hair loss grows back, though in some instances it may be permanent. This can be scary and extremely distressing, both for men and women. We value our hair, as it is closely tied to our identity and our personal style. You can’t deny that feeling of awesomeness when you first walk out of the salon or barber shop after a fresh new cut. Luckily, diabetes hair loss can be controlled and treated with the right methods. Let’s take a deeper look into the root causes and what you can do about it. The Role of Insulin in Diabetes Hair Loss Insulin is a hormone created in the pancreas that allows your body to utilize glucose (sugar) from carbohydrates. The insulin moves those sugars from the bloodstream to the cells, where they are either used as energy or stored for later use. If you have diabetes, either your body doesn’t produce this vital hormone (Type 1 diabetes), it doesn’t use it effectively (Type 2 diabetes), or both. This can result in a buildup of sugar in the bloodstream. This excess sugar can cause a variety of problems including: Damaging the body’s organs including the eyes, nerves and kidneys. Damaging the blood vessels, which may prevent them from delivering enough oxygen to nourish organs and tissues, including hair follicles. Both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can cause hair loss. Why Does Diabetes Cause Hair Loss? Diabetes hair loss is very complex and reasons for it are diverse. This makes it difficult to pinpoint exactly what might be causing your hair loss. Let’s discuss some of the potential culprits. Hormonal Imbalance Uncontrolled diabetes can cause a disruption of your body’s hormones. H Continue reading >>

Help — I’m Losing My Hair!

Help — I’m Losing My Hair!

When I was younger, everyone wanted Farrah Fawcett’s hairstyle. Jennifer Aniston popularized “The Rachel” haircut on the hit show Friends. And we’re all seeing men sporting “man buns” alongside women. Hair is a big deal in our culture. Hair has figured prominently in history, too. The Bible tells us that Samson garnered his strength from his long hair, and lost that strength when Delilah cut it off. Priests and monks used to shave the crowns of their head to show a lack of vanity and symbolize their vow of chastity. Over the centuries, different cultures have upheld norms about hair: for example, the Mohawk hairstyle that we’ve all seen stems from Pawnee Native American nation of the Midwest. People in some African tribes shave their heads as, for example, a sign of mourning or marital status. We value our hair. Who doesn’t view a head full of lush, shiny hair as a symbol of health, success, and confidence? Our hair is tied closely to our identity. We talk about “good” and “bad” hair days. And when we walk out of that salon with our hair freshly styled, it feels like we’re on top of the world. Hair-loss statistics According to the American Hair Loss Association, by the age of 35, two-thirds of men will have some degree of hair loss; by age 50, about 85% of men will have significant thinning of their hair. Hair loss is prevalent in women, too — they make up 40% of hair-loss sufferers. Thanks to society’s pressure to be attractive, hair loss can have a major negative effect on quality of life. Hair loss can be devastating, leading to loss of confidence, poor self-image, and even depression. Alopecia areata There are many causes of hair loss, including thyroid issues, hormonal changes, scalp infections, certain medications, chemotherapy, and r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Body Care: It's For Everyone

Diabetes Body Care: It's For Everyone

Common foot problems can cause many complications, including athlete's foot , fungal infections in nails, calluses , corns, blisters , bunions , dry skin , sores, hammertoes , ingrown toenails , and plantar warts . While anyone can have these problems, they're more critical for people with diabetes because: If you have nerve damage , you may not feel small wounds that need treatment. If you're immune suppressed, you may be more prone to infection. Damaged foot muscle nerves may prevent your foot from aligning properly, causing you to put more pressure on one area of the foot, leading to foot sores and pressure point ulcers. Prevention tips: Make time for foot care daily. Wash, dry and examine the tops and bottoms of your feet. Check for cracked skin, cuts, scratches, wounds, blisters, redness, calluses, and other changes. Use antibiotic creams recommended by your doctor and apply sterile bandages to protect cuts. Prevent ingrown toenails by cutting toenails straight across; don't cut corners. Don't go barefoot and always protect your feet. Make sure you wear properly fitting footwear. If you develop even minor foot problems , treat them right away or see a doctor. And see a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two or three months. Checking your feet daily means you can catch small things and get them treated before they become serious. Make it part of your daily morning routine -- it doesn't take long. Bacterial infections , fungal infections, and itching are common skin problems anyone can develop, but they're especially problematic for people with diabetes because of poor blood flow and because the body may not be fighting infection well. Avoid extremely serious complications. Don't ignore these problems: Bacterial infections like boils ( hair follicle infections) require Continue reading >>

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