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Green Tea And Diabetes Type 2

Can Green Tea Or Garlic Prevent Diabetes, Prediabetes?

Can Green Tea Or Garlic Prevent Diabetes, Prediabetes?

Can Green Tea or Garlic Prevent Diabetes, Prediabetes? Could drinking green tea and adding garlic reduce your risk of prediabetes and diabetes? Two recent studiesone on green tea and the other on aged garlicfound that extracts from these foods may be beneficial to individuals who have diabetes or who are at risk for developing the disorder.1,2 But dont run out and buy green tea extract or garlic extract just yet! If they offer any health benefits, the best result occurs when they are taken along with other strategies, experts say. Everybody wants that one-pill fix, says Sherri Findley, MS, RD, a dietitian at University of Florida Health Shands Hospital in Gainesville, Florida, Of course, its tempting to take a product and hope it will prevent these diseases. You may be interested in these related articles: Findings of AntiDiabetes, Obesity Properties In the recent clinical trial on aged garlic extract that focused on adults with obesity,1 researchers focused on whether daily supplements of aged garlic extract might reduce inflammation and improve immune function. The results are promising given some evidence that taking aged garlic extract (3.6 grams) might improve blood cholesterol levels and have a favorable effect on the immune system.1 In a second study, also published in the journalClinical Nutrition ESPEN, 120 women who were overweight (body mass index >24) were assigned to consume green tea extract (1 gram), metformin, or green tea with metformin.2 The evidence suggested that green tea extract outperformed metformin in terms of improving blood sugar control in women who did not have diabetes but were overweight and therefore considered at risk for developing the condition. Such Small Studies Only Offer a Bit of Hope, for Now Angela Fitch, MD, FACP, associate pro Continue reading >>

Green Tea Lowers The Blood Sugar Level

Green Tea Lowers The Blood Sugar Level

High blood levels of glucose and insulin predispose people to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and are associated with accelerated aging. For many people, sugar is the primary culprit in the accumulation of body fat. One animal study showed a significant reduction in body fat in response to green tea catechin supplementation. Diabetes, or “sugar diabetes,” as it is most commonly referred to, is broken down into two main classes. Type One: Insulin Dependent Diabetes (IDDM) Type Two: Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes (NIDDM) Other forms of diabetes include gestational diabetes (during pregnancy), water diabetes, and several other rare types of diabetes. Diabetes is a disease characterized by the insufficient secretion or improper functioning of insulin. Insulin regulates the amount of blood sugar in our tissue. Improper absorption of blood sugar leads to excess concentrations that must be released through urine. If this continues for long periods of time, it can lead to a number of more serious illnesses. Green Tea Lowers the Blood Sugar Level Green tea polyphenols and polysaccharides are effective in lowering blood sugar. Another study showed that green tea extract reduced the normal elevation of glucose and insulin when 50 grams of starch were ingested. The polyphenol group of green tea catechins has been shown to lower blood sugars, as well as the polysaccharides in green tea. In fact, researchers have found that EGCG (also known as epigallocatechin gallete, one of the catechin polyphenols) influences the primary way that glucose is absorbed. EGCG may also help diabetics by mimicking the actions of insulin and inhibiting the liver’s production of glucose, thus lowering blood sugar. The liver produces some glucose, but the most common sugar spikes occur from the Continue reading >>

Is Green Tea Good For Diabetes?

Is Green Tea Good For Diabetes?

There are 2 topics that interest me more than most things, they are inflammation and diabetes. I'd heard that green tea was good for diabetes and in reducing inflammation, so I decided to dig into the research behind green tea, to see if it really is as great as I've heard it is. Here's what I found. Nutrient Profile Of Green Tea Did you know that green tea and black tea are from the same plant? To tell you the truth, neither did I, but they both come from the ‘Camellia sinensis' plant. Green tea is unfermented and dried, while the black tea is fermented and treated to get a darker, different tasting tea. The fermentation process effects the nutrient profile of the tea, having the most impact on the phenolic compounds in the plant, because these are where we get the benefits. The phenolics in black tea are only 5%, while in green tea they are 30-40%, so that’s a big difference. Green Tea Nutrients Green Tea Catechins 15% protein 4% amino acids 26% fiber 7% carbs 7% lipids 5% minerals 30-40% phenolic/flavonoid compounds 2-6% caffeine 6.4% epicatechin 13.6% epicatechin3-gallate 19% epigallcathechin 59% epigallocathechin-3-gallate The catechins found in green tea have been studied for their amazing antioxidant power and have been shown to be: anti-mutigenic anti-cancer anti-diabetic anti-inflammatory anti-bacterial anti-viral As you can see from the catechins, there is 59% epigallocathechin-3-gallate, and this is the one that has been shown to have some amazing benefits in reducing inflammation, reducing heart conditions, reducing weight gain, helping type 2 diabetes, aiding cancer, and helping arthritis. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects Of Green Tea When we get inflammation, our body produces inflammatory cytokines, these are proteins that upregulate the immune response Continue reading >>

Go For The Green: Cool Down With Green Tea

Go For The Green: Cool Down With Green Tea

How many of you are tea drinkers? If you’re a tea aficionado, you’re probably feeling pretty smug about all the positive news that’s come out over the past few years regarding the health benefits of tea. Tea has often been maligned because of its caffeine content, but now we know that tea is a powerhouse of antioxidants that may prevent all sorts of health problems. This week, I’ll focus on green tea in particular. Now that summer is upon us, many of you probably reach for a glass or bottle of iced tea to quench your thirst. New to the market are bottles of iced green tea (remember the days when iced tea only came in a powder that was more sugar than tea?). Several companies now make iced green tea, including Lipton, Snapple and AriZona. What’s so great about green tea, anyway? Well, first, green tea comes from the same plant as black tea, Camellia sinensis. While green tea might be something more of a novelty in the United States, it’s actually been quite popular in China for, oh, the past 5,000 years or so. Green tea is made from the unfermented leaves of the tea plant, and supposedly contains the highest amounts of polyphenols, which are types of antioxidants that fight free radicals and possibly prevent certain types of diseases. For thousands of years, people in China, India, and Thailand have used green tea for numerous medicinal purposes. Thanks to population studies, we now know much more about the health properties that green tea has to offer. For example, green tea may help prevent heart disease by improving cholesterol levels. In one recent study, 90% of the subjects who drank one liter of green tea daily for four weeks had a 9% reduction in LDL (bad) cholesterol, and, in 69% of the subjects, there was a 4% increase in HDL (good) cholesterol. In a Continue reading >>

Green Tea And Type 2 Diabetes

Green Tea And Type 2 Diabetes

We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Jae-Hyung Park, Jae-Hoon Bae, [...], and Dae-Kyu Song Green tea and coffee consumption have been widely popular worldwide. These beverages contain caffeine to activate the central nervous system by adenosine receptor blockade, and due to the caffeine, addiction or tolerance may occur. In addition to this caffeine effect, green tea and coffee consumption have always been at the center of discussions about human health, disease, and longevity. In particular, green tea catechins are involved in many biological activities such as antioxidation and modulation of various cellular lipid and proteins. Thus, they are beneficial against degenerative diseases, including obesity, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and various inflammatory diseases. Some reports also suggest that daily consumption of tea catechins may help in controlling type 2 diabetes. However, other studies have reported that chronic consumption of green tea may result in hepatic failure, neuronal damage, and exacerbation of diabetes, suggesting that interindividual variations in the green tea effect are large. This review will focus on the effect of green tea catechins extracted from the Camellia sinensis plant on type 2 diabetes and obesity, and the possible mechanistic explanation for the experimental results mainly from our laboratory. It is hoped that green tea can be consumed in a suitable manner as a supplement to preve Continue reading >>

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Is It Ok For Diabetics To Drink Green Tea?

Green tea may provide a number of health benefits, such as lowering your risk for cancer, high cholesterol and Parkinson's disease, according to MedlinePlus. Although research is still in the preliminary stages, green tea may also help reduce your risk for developing diabetes and the complications sometimes associated with this condition. It may also make it easier to control your blood sugar levels. Diabetics can safely drink green tea, but they should carefully monitor their blood sugar levels because of the potential blood sugar-lowering effect of green tea. Video of the Day A study using mice published in the "British Journal of Nutrition" in April 2011 found that an antioxidant found in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate, or ECGC, may help delay the onset of Type 1 diabetes. Other animal studies have shown that green tea may help regulate blood glucose levels and help slow the progression of this condition once you have it, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center. Further studies would be needed to verify that these benefits occur in people as well as animals. Green Tea and Type 2 Diabetes Drinking caffeinated green tea may help lower your risk for Type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in "Annals of Internal Medicine" in 2006. Study participants who drank at least 6 cups of green tea per day had a 33 percent lower risk for Type 2 diabetes than participants who drank 1 cup or less per week. Drinking at least 3 cups of coffee per day had a similar effect, but drinking black or oolong tea didn't decrease diabetes risk. Once a person has diabetes, however, it may be best to drink less green tea; a preliminary study using animals published in "BioFactors" in 2007 found that high doses of green tea may increase blood sugar in diabetics, co Continue reading >>

Green Tea For Type 2 Diabetes

Green Tea For Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a degenerative disease in which the body becomes less efficient at absorbing and utilizing glucose. It is different than Type 1 diabetes because it is acquired as the body’s cells become less and less receptive to insulin—the shuttle that delivers glucose to be burned and stored in cells—whereas type 1 is present at birth. Elevated production of insulin is a sign of diabetes in its gestation period. Insulin is the aging hormone, like oxygen its presence is needed in the body for metabolism, but resistance linked over production results in what appears to be rapid aging. It only seems natural that as Western medicine confronts this epidemic it would turn to one of nature’s most renowned anti-aging botanicals, green tea. Diabetes is a highly complex disorder that, while it can be partially attributed to genetic proclivities, depends primarily on lifestyle choices. An unbalanced diet high in sugar and nutritionally inferior processed foods (which are full of sugar) and a sedentary life are two of the most common contributing factors leading to the development of diabetes. In response to the metabolizing of sugar, the pancreas secretes the enzyme insulin along with other pancreatic digestive juices to transport glucose into individual cells throughout the body to be burned (body heat). Insulin is needed because with the exception of the brain and liver most organs and tissue cannot absorb glucose on their own. In the process water and carbon dioxide are created, but the cell is also capable of trapping energy through a chemical process. This energy is a reserve. When blood sugar volumes spike, as they do after eating, say, a candy bar, the pancreas must secrete an ample amount of insulin to “shuttle” the glucose into cells—glucose is a stick Continue reading >>

Can Green Tea Help To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Green Tea Help To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Drinking green tea or taking green tea extract supplements may help reduce risk of type 2 diabetes…. G.J. van Woudenbergh of InterAct Consortium and colleagues found the possible protective effect after meta-analyzing data from 340,234 participants who were enrolled in the EPIC-InterAct case-cohort study and followed up during 3.99 million person-years during which 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes were identified. Tea consumption was correlated inversely with incidence of type 2 diabetes. Those who drank four cups of tea per day or more were 16 percent less likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, compared with non-drinkers. It was also found that those drinking less than 4 cups of tea per day was associated with 7 percent reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus, compared with those who did not drink any. The researchers concluded, "A linear inverse association was observed between tea consumption and incidence of type 2 diabetes. People who drink at least 4 cups of tea per day may have a 16% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than non-non tea drinkers." Drinking green tea has been associated with reduced risk of obesity in early studies among other benefits. PLoS One, Sept. 2012 Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Green Tea Extract Pills For Type 2 Diabetics.

Benefits Of Green Tea Extract Pills For Type 2 Diabetics.

Green Tea Extract Pills The Final Verdict Green tea comes from the same plant, Camellia sinensis, as black tea does. The difference is in the way the two teas are processed. While black tea is fermented, green tea is not. Green tea is made from a variety of tea plants called Camellia sinensis sinensis that is native to China.. It is either consumed as a decoction after steeping or as a supplement. What Does Research Have to Say About Green Tea Extract? Several studies have tried to elucidate the effects of green tea on obesity and type 2 diabetes. One study observed 25 communities across Japan, a country known for its high green tea consumption. It concluded that consumption of green tea was associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Another cross-sectional survey of 1210 people found an inverse relationship between green tea consumption and body fat percentage/ body fat distribution. A 2006 cohort study performed on around 40,500 Japanese individuals aged 40 to 79 years concluded that green tea consumption was associated with reduced mortality because of all causes including cardiovascular disease. The 2013 study published in Diabetes and Metabolism Journal suggested that that green tea extract may be a useful tool for preventing both obesity and obesity-induced type 2 diabetes. A meta analysis published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, that comprised of a total of 17 trials totaling 1133 individuals, found that green tea decreased fasting glucose and HBA1c concentrations. Tea is rich in a number of bioactive compounds, the most active being catechins. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is the most abundant of all catechins in tea and is believed to be the most active compound showing the beneficial effects of green tea. EGCG is a potent antioxidant Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Green Tea On Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

The Effects Of Green Tea On Obesity And Type 2 Diabetes

Obesity and type 2 diabetes are major public health issues worldwide, contributing to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The proportions of people with obesity and/or type 2 diabetes have increased and recently reaching epidemic levels in Asia [1]. Although pharmacologic modality is the mainstay treatment of diabetes, remedies using plants (e.g., garlic, psyllium, and green tea) have stimulated a new interest in research [2]. Green tea (Camellia sinensis) is one of the world's most popular beverages, especially in Asian countries including Korea, China, and Japan. Because of the high rate of green tea consumption in these populations, even small effects on an individual basis could have a large public health impact [3]. A population-based, prospective cohort study has shown that green tea consumption is associated with reduced mortality due to all causes and cardiovascular disease as well [4], and randomized controlled trials have indicated that green tea is effective in decreasing blood pressure, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, oxidative stress, and a marker of chronic inflammation [5]. Various studies have shown the beneficial effects of green tea, not only on cardiovascular diseases but also on obesity and type 2 diabetes itself [6,7]. In a retrospective cohort study performed in Japan, a 33% risk reduction of developing type 2 diabetes was found in subjects consuming six or more cups of green tea daily compared to those consuming less than 1 cup per week [6]. Wu et al. [7] reported that Taiwanese subjects who had habitually consumed tea for more than 10 years showed lower body fat composition and smaller waist circumference. Evidences from epidemiological studies suggest the possibility of green tea being a novel strategy for treatment or prevent Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Green Tea Is Best For Diabetes Patients

6 Reasons Why Green Tea Is Best For Diabetes Patients

Green tea, which is the products made from Camellia sinensis leaves, is one of the varieties of tea, alongside with black tea and oolong tea. While it is originates from China, but right in the moment you can find it all around the world. Green tea, which is commonly served as a beverage, also has a very good reputation to cure and protect you from various kinds of disease. Sponsors Link One of the most common questions among the societies is whether green tea would be beneficial for diabetic people or not. The answer to that question is yes, definitely that green tea would be very useful to protect you from diabetes. Before we tell you about why green tea is so beneficial for diabetic people, firstly, we need to know what is diabetes and what are the types of diabetes. Definition of Diabetes and Its Types Diabetes is a disease that can occur because of the high levels of blood sugar (glucose) in your body. The blood sugars in your body are commonly regulated by the insulin hormone, which is produced by the pancreas. In a diabetic person, pancreas couldn’t produce the insulin hormone in a proper amount or there is a problem with how the body cells’ respond to it. There are two types of diabetes, which are diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Diabetes type 1. This type of diabetes could occur when the pancreas stops producing insulin hormone, and this type of diabetes is unpreventable. The only way to treat this type of diabetes is by daily injection of insulin. Diabetes type 2. This type of diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes could occur because of your unhealthy lifestyle such as insufficient physical activity, poor diet, and obesity. Long term effects of type 2 diabetes is very dangerous for your health, even very deadly. Reasons on Continue reading >>

What Teas Are Good For Diabetes?

What Teas Are Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes is one of the most common health problems Americans face - with more than 25 million people in the country suffering from this disease. It can be a serious disorder, and one that will definitely affect your life. You'll have to change your diet habits, find foods that won't affect your blood sugar, and basically transform your life! Did you know that tea can actually be good for diabetes? Black Tea Black tea is highly recommended for those with diabetes, as it contains a special polysaccharide compound that acts almost exactly like the diabetes drugs Precose and Glyset. These drugs are prescribed for Type 2 Diabetes, and they are effective at controlling the symptoms - by reducing the production of glucose. Green Tea Green tea can help to target diabetes specifically. Drinking green tea will stop your body from producing amylase - the enzyme that breaks down starches and turns them into sugar. As your body produces less amylase, it can only process so much starch at a time. This will slow down the rate at which it's turned into glucose, slowing the rise in your blood sugar levels. Green tea will also slow down the rate of absorbtion of starches. Matcha Another option is Matcha, which is a a powdered form of tea. Matcha is typically made from green tea, and contains all the good things in green tea in higher concentrations. Plus, it has soluable fiber which is recommended, beause it also helps slow the metolism of starches. New to the market are flavored matcha, which take natural essences to offer a variety of flavors. Matcha can be consumed straight or made like a latte. Chamomile Tea Chamomile tea is the soothing relaxant cup of goodness that we have all enjoyed when suffering from the flu, but it's also quite effective at dealing with diabetes symptoms. Cham Continue reading >>

Green Tea Diabetes Benefits: Effect Of Green Tea On Blood Sugar

Green Tea Diabetes Benefits: Effect Of Green Tea On Blood Sugar

Diabetes is a disease which is caused either due to the lack of proper production of insulin by the pancreas or due to the improper use of insulin in the human body. This gives rise to the blood sugar level or the glucose level in the body since the hormone insulin is responsible for the essential breakdown of carbohydrates and fats which, in turn, help in maintaining the required level of sugar and glucose in the blood.There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both are equally common these days and is known to affect a wide population of individuals all across the globe. Treating diabetes could be extremely tricky as it comes along with several other complications such as cardiovascular and kidney-related diseases, diabetic eye, leg swelling, high blood pressure, amongst a host of other complications. Experts are always looking for something natural which can treat this extremely complicated disease. Although one you have caught the disease, it becomes almost impossible to eradicate it completely, the same can be controlled to a great extent if a healthy lifestyle is followed. One such approach is the regular consumption of green tea. The drink is a rich source of several essential vitamins, amino acids, polyphenols, alkaloids, etc. due to which the drink is no less than a miracle. It treats heart and kidney related diseases, has a stimulating effect, helps control bad cholesterol and even high blood pressure. In this article, we shall try to explore the various benefits of green tea that the drink has for a diabetes patient. Green tea has garnered instant popularity owing to the healing properties. Today we shall find out the different compounds and chemicals that are present in the tea due to which it is not only beneficial for those suffering Continue reading >>

Green Tea And Diabetes Management

Green Tea And Diabetes Management

Nearly 10 percent of people in the United States have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Foundation. When you have diabetes, life becomes all about regulating your blood sugar to stay healthy. And while many must turn to medication and insulin injections, there is evidence to suggest that drinking green tea could make diabetes management easier. Several studies have pointed to green tea as a potentially effective method of controlling diabetes, and even improving insulin sensitivity. Just how it works isn’t completely clear, but it’s believed catechins within the tea — also responsible for its anticancer and heart health benefits — may be responsible. How Diabetes Works When you eat foods with carbohydrates, they are digested into sugar. In response, the pancreas releases insulin to help cells absorb glucose to be used as fuel. However, when you have diabetes, the process is hindered. People with type 2 diabetes have cells that are desensitized to insulin, which is known as insulin resistance. This, and the fact that the pancreas often stops releasing enough insulin, makes their blood sugar levels difficult to control. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease; the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin are attacked and killed by the body’s immune system, and simply do not produce insulin at all. 8 Essential Benefits of Green Tea » Most studies on the effects of green tea in people with diabetes have focused on type 2 diabetes, as it is more common, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of the diabetes seen in the United States. Green Tea and Diabetes Prevention There are indications that green tea can reduce the risk of developing diabetes. According to one study in Japan, people who drank six or more cups of green tea daily were 33 percent less likel Continue reading >>

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

Can Tea Help With Diabetes? Is It Beneficial?

When living with diabetes, every food and drink choice becomes a conversation. Deciding what you put in your body can be a daunting task when the consequences of choosing poorly are more extreme than what a person living without diabetes might face. It’s also true that food and drink choices can be some of the simplest, and most empowering, ways for people living with diabetes to manage their condition and its symptoms. There has been some evidence in recent years that drinking certain teas, in certain quantities, can have a beneficial effect on your health whether you have diabetes or not. For those living with diabetes, tea actually has the potential to do a lot of good. Depending on what type you drink, tea can chemically assist your body with processing and managing sugar and insulin levels, and can also help people manage some of the symptoms of diabetes, including circulation problems, energy levels, blood pressure and more. A Little Background on Tea Tea is a hot or cold beverage consumed by billions of people across the globe daily, with 3 billion tons of tea produced every year for human consumption. There are many varieties of tea; green, white, black, oolong, rooibos, herbal… the list can be long and a bit intimidating, especially when you take into account that many “teas” don’t actually contain the leaves of the tea plant, or camellia sinensis, which is an evergreen shrub native to Asia. Rooibos is made from a bush native to Southern Africa. Herbal teas can contain flowers, leaves, or other parts of a number of different plant varieties, and all of these plants can and do have a different effect on your body. Given that so many people drink tea of one sort or another on such a regular basis, science has been studying the effect that tea and it’s Continue reading >>

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