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Great Diabetic Snacks

The 6 Best After School Snacks For Children With Diabetes

The 6 Best After School Snacks For Children With Diabetes

When children come home from school they are usually eager to have a snack. It is important to choose proper snacks for children with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes; consider these 6 as some of the best. Always check with their physician to see if their insulin regimen allows between meal snacking. Healthy after school snacks help children with diabetes have energy until dinnertime as well as manage their blood sugar levels. Choose snacks your child enjoys and offer your child a variety of options. Snacks should come from the basic food groups, such as vegetables and fruit, low-fat dairy and whole grains. Try to stay away from packaged and processed snacks that could be packed with sugar, salt and/or fat. Consider single-serving diabetic snacks if your child wants a portable treat to bring to after school activities. Plenty of snacks are easy to pack if your child stays after school for sports or clubs. Consider air-popped popcorn, seasoned with a spoonful of grated cheese rather than butter and salt, or a handful of small unsalted pretzels. Unsalted whole grain crackers in a proper serving size are another tasty option. Read the labels to find out more about other options. Individual bags of baked vegetable chips and homemade trail mix may be a great choice. Add raisins, walnuts, sunflower seeds and oatmeal squares for a simple and delicious trail mix. These items can be packed in an airtight container or zip lock bag to stay fresh and crunchy in your child’s locker or backpack. Another crunchy snack for your children may be plain rice cakes rather than flavored ones. Keep fresh ground peanut butter, almond butter and sugar-free fruit spread in the house to give the rice cakes added flavor. Always use proper portion sizes. Some children enjoy a dairy snack after a long da Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

Snacking can help or hinder your glycemic control…. You are the force behind which occurs. Whether we are addressing snacking between meals or evening and bedtime snacks, some familiar mistakes are described below with some helpful tips to conquer those slip-ups. 1. Too Many Carbs Ask anyone what their favorite snacks are…. They are nearly all high carbohydrate foods. Crackers, pretzels, chips, cookies…. All go-to snacks for kids and adults alike. Carbohydrate content of snacks is typically recommended at 15-30 grams. Just one cup of the thin pretzel sticks contains 36 grams of carbohydrate. An 8-ounce container of lowfat strawberry yogurt contains 43 grams of carbohydrate. Only 15 Triscuit-type crackers contains 45 grams of carbohydrate. It is easy to eat more than you need. Tip: Read labels carefully for serving size and total carbohydrate. 2. Not Enough Carbs On the flip side, many people with diabetes go overboard and avoid carbohydrate at snack time. In reality, you need some carbohydrate continuously through the day for energy. Some common low-carbohydrate snacks: 1 ounce of cheese (contains zero carbohydrate), carrot and celery sticks with ranch dressing (about 8 grams of carbohydrate), or ¼ cup of roasted almonds (7 grams of carbohydrate). Remember that typical recommendations are for 15-30 grams of carbohydrate in a snack. Tip: Don’t be afraid to include some carbs in your snack, just be informed about how much you are eating. 3. Caught Without a Plan You are driving the kids to and from extracurricular activities, or you have a crazy day at work, or you are on a business trip…. Hectic schedules can certainly interfere with your eating plan. The best laid plans may get side tracked. But, having a plan in place in the beginning is the key to success. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Snacks

Low Carb Snacks

Tweet Low carb snack ideas to get you through the day. These low carbohydrate snacks are much healthier than crisps and biscuits, and are, of course, kinder to blood sugar levels. Raw vegetables Raw vegetables are relatively low carb and are as healthy a snack you can get. The other advantage is that they make for a very quick and easy snack to prepare. Examples include: Carrot sticks Chopped pepper Cucumber Tomatoes Celery Nuts One of the most popular low carb snacks are nuts. Nuts are rich in calories so are good for providing energy, though just a word of caution if you are watching your calorie intake. If you want to be kind to your heart, you may want to avoid the salted varieties of nuts. Tzatziki This Greek favourite is a delicious snack needing little more than natural yoghurt, cucumber, olive oil and garlic. Low carb hummus Hummus is quite a good low carb choice in itself but if you wish for lower carbohydrate content then you can replace some of the chick peas with avocado. Deli meats A good cut of ham or slices of chicken make for a satisfying snack. Enjoy either with mustard or a non-sugary sauce of your choice. Cheese and apple slices Apple may not be particularly low carb but half an apple’s worth of apple slices with cheese should have a relatively benign effect on blood sugar levels. People with type 1 diabetes may find they need to inject a small amount though. Cottage cheese dip Cottage cheese dip with radish and dill makes for a nice snack. Enjoy with raw vegetables or low carb crackers. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin T Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetic Friendly Snack Ever

The Best Diabetic Friendly Snack Ever

This week I’m trying to give you some diabetic friendly snack options that are tasty and easy to make. You know how food can just make you feel so happy sometimes? I mean, it doesn’t solve world problems or truly fulfill you, but sometimes it just makes you smile! My husband and I call that feeling “the thing.” When we tell each other that a particular food did “the thing,” we pause for a moment of reverence and awe. Chocolate is usually involved in “the thing.” Well, this simple bowl of cherries, nuts, coconut, and chocolate did “the thing.” After making a few versions of this snack I’ve realized that in order for it to do “the thing,” the cherries need to be sweet and the almond butter needs to be roasted and salted. Usually I recommend using raw almond butter, because it is a bit better for you than the roasted kind. Raw almond butter is actually sweeter than roasted, so I usually actually prefer the taste, as well. This dish just seemed to need the roasted and salty flavors, though. Don’t worry…although raw almond butter is better than roasted, the roasted is still a healthy snack option, especially for diabetics. Nut butters are high in protein, healthy fat, and minerals. They make you feel full, because they’re high in calories, but they are healthy, low carb calories. Honestly, I think I would wither away into nothing if I couldn’t eat nuts! They’ve replaced a lot of the grains that I used to eat. Dark chocolate is another great snack option for diabetics. It is high in fat, which makes the sugar enter your blood stream at a slower rate, and trace minerals, which helps your metabolism run smoothly. Do you ever wonder why women crave chocolate during pms? My nutritionist has told me it’s because they need the trace minerals. Y Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

High Protein Snacks For Diabetics

High Protein Snacks For Diabetics

If you have diabetes, your body does not metabolize carbohydrates properly, and you have high blood sugar levels. A carbohydrate-controlled diet can help you manage your blood sugar levels, and healthy, high-protein snacks can help you stick to such a meal plan. The American Diabetes Association suggests including a source of protein at each meal. Video of the Day An 8-ounce container of fat-free plain yogurt contains 13 grams of protein, or 26 percent of the daily value for an individual on a 2,000-calorie diet. Consuming more low-fat dairy products, such as yogurt, may help you manage your diabetes. Yogurt is a good source of calcium, which helps build and maintain strong bones. For a high-protein, low-carbohydrate snack, have plain, fat-free yogurt with cut vegetables, such as broccoli and cauliflower florets or snow peas. A 3-ounce serving of canned light tuna in water provides 16.5 grams of protein. Canned tuna and tuna in a pouch are ready-to-eat foods that you can store without refrigeration at home or work. Tuna provides omega-3 fatty acids, which can lower your risk for heart disease when you consume them regularly. This benefit is important for diabetics because diabetes is a risk factor for heart disease. Have tuna on a slice of whole-wheat bread with lettuce and tomatoes. Sliced turkey breast contains 4.7 grams of protein per ounce and only 28 calories. Take a few slices of turkey and spread them with part-skim ricotta cheese, which provides 14 grams of protein per 1/2-cup serving. Place avocado slices, which provide heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, on the cheese. Roll up each turkey breast slice around the cheese and avocado for your snack. Vary the snack by using fat-free cottage cheese or slices of low-fat Swiss cheese instead of ricotta. A 4-ounce ser Continue reading >>

Healthy Swaps: Snacks

Healthy Swaps: Snacks

Everyone needs a snack in between meals occasionally – but, if you have diabetes, you’ll want something small that will satisfy your hunger, is low in fat and sugar, and will not have a big effect on your blood glucose level. If you’re bored with the same old snacks, here are some quick and easy ideas you can put together from ingredients you have at home or can buy easily. They also don’t need any cooking. We’ve divided them into snacks under 10g carbs and those containing 50, 100 and 150 calories. If you’re trying to lose weight, opt for the snacks with the least amount of calories. Snack guidance We don’t recommend snacks labelled ‘diabetic’, which tend to be expensive and don’t offer you any special health benefits. The key is to plan your favourite snacks so they fit into your overall diet and watch your portion sizes. Confused where to start with snacks? Depending on whether you need help with calorie-controlled snack ideas or low-carb snack guidance, click on the relevant link below: Snack swaps Swapping is an easy way to eat better while still enjoying the foods you like. Here's a few ideas to try to get you started. 1 small apple: 38 calories 2 satsumas: 50 calories 4 heaped tbsp blueberries: 44 calories 1 handful of grapes: 45 calories 1 kiwi fruit: 42 calories 1 peach: 30 calories 3 rings pineapple: 50 calories 1 light cheese triangle (25 calories) and 8 cherry tomatoes (24 calories): 49 calories 30g ready-to-eat partially rehydrated prunes: 48 calories 1 rice cake (27 calories) and 1 teaspoon (10g) pure fruit spread (22 calories): 49 calories 1 x 14g mini box of raisins: 45 calories 1 lighter cheese slice (34 calories) with ¼ cucumber (11 calories): 45 calories 1 x 115g pot sugar-free jelly: 8 calories 4 bread sticks: 92 calories 80g def Continue reading >>

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

10 Kid Approved & Diabetic Friendly Snacks

Any of you with kids know that the amount of requests kids make for a snack in a day is astronomical. Having both of my kids at home all summer long, many days it seems like my day consists of: make breakfast, clean up the kitchen, give the kids a snack, make lunch, clean up the kitchen, make a snack, make dinner, clean up the kitchen, fall into bed. Ok, I am exaggerating, but you get the point. Kids eat…A LOT! I always try to provide my kids with healthy snack options. I also like to keep snacks lower carb, so that my son’s blood sugar doesn’t peak too much in between meals, and so that it has time to stabilize before beginning another meal. I thought I would share a few ideas of what snack time looks like at our house, by giving you 10 sample snacks. In most, there is more than one snack idea. Exact carbohydrate calculations will vary, but I will give you the rough estimates of the food pictured. Freeze-Dried Fruit & Popcorn: My kids love freeze-dried fruit, and I love it because it is great to have on hand once our favorite seasonal fruits are no longer in season. I buy the single-serving bags and it makes for a great snack and/or addition to meals. Popcorn is a snack-time favorite at our household as well because it is so low carb. For 1 bag of freeze-dried fruit (containing blueberries, raspberries & strawberries), there are 10 g of carbs and 3 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 7 g. 1 cup of popcorn contains approximately 3 g of carbs and .5 g of fiber. Total NET CARBS are 2.5 g. Frutas secas y palomitas de maíz 1 bolsa de frutas secas congeladas (con arándanos, frambuesas y fresas), contiene 10 g de carbohidratos y 3 g de fibra. Total de carbohidratos: 7 g. 1 Taza de palomitas de maíz contiene aproximadamente 3 g de carbohidratos y 5 g de fibra. Total de ca Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

What Is The Best Late Night Snack For A Diabetic?

There are lot many choices available for your request, but for now I’ll suggest one of them, that is POPCORN We all love popcorn, and fortunately popcorn has high nutritive value and highly beneficial as a food item only if we don;t ruin it with toppings such as sugar, salt, butter, caramel, etc. Plain air popped popcorn is the best choice for diabetics and it is recommended to have it as is. If at all you want to have some toppins (but only occasionally) you can add cinnamon, black pepper or red chilli powder (only a pinch of anyone of these). Other than this, plain air popped popcorn has low fat content, low sugar content, high dietary fibers, high fullness factor and low calories which makes it a very ideal snack to munch on. The ideal serving size, nutritional assessment and other discussions related to popcorn can be appreciated here: Thanks! Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diabetic Super Snack Tips

Low-carb Diabetic Super Snack Tips

Healthy snacks are critical for helping Type 2 diabetics reverse their diabetes. Why? Because most of us tend to get hungry between breakfast and lunch and between lunch and dinner. Also, a healthy snack between meals helps to stabilize your blood glucose levels so that your blood glucose doesn't go too low. A healthy, balanced snack also prevents a biochemical imbalance that can trigger a food craving or hormonal craving. Three of the most common mistakes that diabetics make when it comes to snacks are: (1) Eating an unhealthy snack; (2) Skipping the snack; or, (3) Skipping the snack but giving in later to eat some junk food. Consequently snack planning is just as important as meal planning if you want to be able to control and reverse your diabetes. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack will help you keep your blood glucose steady. A snack is also important if you’re taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Make sure that your super snacks contain protein, fiber and, yes, some fat. Snacks rich in protein and fiber along with some fat make your snack more satisfying, e.g. organic peanut butter, low fat cheese or cottage cheese, unsalted nuts, eggs, yogurt. Also, make sure that your super snacks are low in salt, saturated fat, and trans fat. Here are some snack tips to help you with creating healthy diabetic super snacks: Eat an apple (with the skin) or other whole fruit with the skin (e.g. pear, dark grapes) with a handful of walnuts. The protein and fat in the walnuts will offset the carbs in the apple or other fruit. Note: Never ever eat a piece of fruit by itself! This is a common mistake that diabetics make with fruit. Use peanut butter, almond butter with a few whole-grain crackers. Again, the prot Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, you’ll find many healthy ideas below. What is a healthy snack? Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide. The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Here’s a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate-rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats, barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Mid-day snacks Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL (¾ cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL (½ cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus On-the-go snacks These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers 1 single-s Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Starters & Snacks

Diabetes-friendly Starters & Snacks

Grabbing a quick bite to eat can be a disaster to your blood sugar levels if you're not careful, and appetizers and snacks are often laden with calories, salt, and greasy saturated fats. With these diabetes-friendly recipes, you can graze the appetizer table without guilt. Browse through our favorite snack and appetizer recipes now! Sautéed, then roasted with shallots, lemon, and thyme, these tender and flavorful artichokes make perfect party hors d'oeuvres. See the full recipe! Serve this creamy dip with whole wheat bread, pita chips, raw vegetables, or crackers for a filling mid-afternoon snack. See the full recipe! Grilled teriyaki chicken skewers are a succulent addition to fresh zucchini salad tossed with lemon juice and sesame oil. See the full recipe! This sophisticated appetizer of lean pork meatballs with ginger-soy dipping sauce is a delightful first course for a special dinner. See the full recipe! If you're looking for a savory starter to precede a light and crisp main dish, these rich, crabmeat-stuffed shrimp are a perfect solution. See the full recipe! Pair this mélange of juicy fresh fruit, sweet dried fruit, and protein-rich nuts with a cup of chai tea for a piquant afternoon snack. See the full recipe! Garnished with feta and crisp veggies, these easy pan-fried cakes make a pretty party dish. Perfect for unexpected guests, the cakes can be stored in the refrigerator and reheated in a snap. See the full recipe! Make a dent in your 5-a-day with a healthy serving of this flavorful, veggie-filled dip. It’s a great alternative to fat-full ranch or onion dips. See the full recipe! These lightly glazed shrimp skewers are a top-notch finger-food, sure to serve as a conversation-starter at your next party. See the full recipe! Quell your hunger with this del Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Unique Gift Ideas For People With Diabetes

Unique Gift Ideas For People With Diabetes

Have you ever wanted to send someone with diabetes a gift basket only to feel stumped? Traditional gift baskets are typically chock full of carbohydrate rich foods, such as sweet treats, candies, and cookies—items that aren't always diabetes friendly. And many of the gift baskets on the market that are geared towards people with diabetes are filled with medical items, diabetes-related books or food products that say "diabetes" and "sugar-free." Artificial sweeteners and sugar-free candies can make up for sugar's sweetness, but not all people with diabetes like to use them, which makes creating a basket even more of a challenge. Fortunately, if we think a little outside-the-box, we can come up with some unique food and beverage gift basket ideas that are awesome and diabetes appropriate. 8 Gift Basket Food and Beverage Ideas - Perfect for People with Diabetes Dark-Chocolate Treats. Studies have shown that eating a small amount of cacoa found in dark chocolate may have a beneficial effect on blood pressure, insulin resistance, and vascular and platelet function. Choose dark chocolate with a high percentage of cacoa. Look for a high percentage (over 75 percent) with no added sugar. Make sure to check the carbohydrate grams per serving. People with diabetes often aim for 15 g of carbohydrate per serving. Popcorn. Popcorn is a whole grain that is rich in fiber and low in carbohydrate for a decent sized portion (about 3 cups popped contains 15 of carbohydrate). Many companies today make single serve to-go baggies or get creative and place a serving into a mug, festive bowl, or decorative bag. Aim to choose air-popped popcorn or popcorn flavored with olive oil or herbs. Avoid kettle corn and other sweet alternatives as these are rich in added sugar. Fruit. People with diabet Continue reading >>

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