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Grains And Diabetes | Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council

Grains And Diabetes | Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council

You are here: Home / Grains / Grains and Health / Grains and Diabetes Diabetes is Australias fastest growing chronic health problem and accounts for 10% of all deaths in Australia. In 2008, total number of Australians with diagnosed diabetes was 1.015 million people, but it is thought to affect far more with 1 in every 5 people with diabetes undiagnosed. There is strong epidemiological evidence from around the world to suggest that eating a variety of whole grain foods is beneficial in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes this relationship is a consistent conclusion in systematic reviews. Whole grain andhigh fibre foodsare ideal carbohydrate foods to help manage or reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Good quality carbohydrates for improved blood glucose control Carbohydrate is an important energy source for our body. When we eat carbohydrate foods our blood glucose levels rise depending on the amount of carbohydrate we eat, the type of carbohydrate foods we choose and our bodys ability to control blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes develops when our body is no longer able to control blood glucose levels within the normal range. So its very important for people to manage diabetes or reduce their risk of developing diabetes by choosing good quality carbohydrate foods, eating regular meals and spreading carbohydrate foods out evenly during the day. Good quality carbohydrates include whole grains and high fibre grain foods, including breads, breakfast cereals, pasta, rice and crispbreads, provide essential nutrients like vitamins, minerals and protective components like fibres and phytonutrients (i.e. antioxidants). Low GI carbohydrate foods help to improve blood glucose control as these foods are absorbed more slowly than high GI foods and so cause smaller r Continue reading >>

The Best Whole Grains For Type 2 Diabetes

The Best Whole Grains For Type 2 Diabetes

Grains are made from edible seeds or kernels, in their whole form, these contain three components—the endosperm, the germ, and the bran. Refined grains, found in cakes, cookies, or white bread, are processed to remove these three components. Whole grains contain all components of the kernel making them a rich source of fiber, nutrients, and phytochemicals. Whole grains are believed to help prevent diabetes and weight gain. When researchers investigate links between diet and diabetes, one of the most consistent findings is that people who eat more whole grains are less likely to develop this disease. Whole Wheat Wheat is by far the most popular grain in the United States, and is the third most commonly eaten grain worldwide. Breads, pastas, bulgur, couscous, spelt (a relative of wheat) and many breakfast cereals are all derived from wheat. When eaten in their whole grain form, these foods provide insoluble fiber and phytochemicals that have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity. Read the ingredients and make sure it says whole wheat to ensure it is 100% whole grain or look for the whole grain symbol. Corn If you have been snubbing corn as a starchy food that has no place in your diabetes eating plan—you may reconsider after reading this. Corn has one of the highest levels of polyphenols- antioxidants in fruits and vegetables that are considered protective against type 2 diabetes. One serving of air popped corn (3 cups) has twice the amount of polyphenols as a typical serving of fruit plus it will give you 2/3 of your daily recommended whole grain intake. Choose air-popped corn and avoid microwaved popcorn with added fake butter and chemical flavorings. Try garlic powder and Parmesan cheese, a little bit of olive oil, fresh herbs and salt, or a sprinkle of cinnamo Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: “cured By Wheat Belly”

Diabetes: “cured By Wheat Belly”

Take a look at Mary’s story posted on the Wheat Belly Blog: I used to be diabetic. Now I am not. Cured by Wheat Belly. Fasting blood sugar less then 87 mg/dl consistently. Postprandial [after-meal] readings at one hour at 100 mg/dl or less. HbA1c 5.5. No dietician can tell me any lies about wheat or proper carb intake. I struggled for 10+ years following ADA [American Diabetes Association] diet guidelines. I gained 15+ pounds. I walked 15 miles a week at training heart rate. I stopped all that nonsense because it only produced higher and higher blood sugar numbers, even on metformin and with exercise. Something was obviously wrong and I knew it wasn’t my laziness or overindulgence. It was the horrendous advice that was killing me! Now I avoid carbs with the same dilgence that I avoid dieticians and doctors/nurses who give ADA advice. It doesn’t work and it never will. More people are diagnosed with diabetes and/or obesity every year. And with so many dieticians with such rock-solid advice? Hmm . . . Maybe it’s the dieticians who are propelling people to diabetes and obesity. That was certainly the case for me. Thanks, Mary. Isn’t that wonderful? And, by saying goodbye to wheat, she has done more than “just” lose the diabetes, of course. Let’s be clear on this: Grains and sugars CAUSE type 2 diabetes. Wheat is the worst of all grains and therefore wheat causes diabetes. (Wheat also causes type 1 diabetes, by the way, an entirely different, though VERY disturbing, conversation.) Let us count the ways: 1) The amylopectin A “complex” carbohydrate of wheat, given its unusual susceptibility to digestion by the salivary and stomach enzyme, amylase, raises blood sugar to sky-high levels. You know my line: Two slices of whole wheat bread raise blood sugar hig Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Whole-grain And Fiber Intake And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

Whole-grain And Fiber Intake And The Incidence Of Type 2 Diabetes

Whole-grain and fiber intake and the incidence of type 2 diabetes From the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (JM, PK, AA, and AR); the Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki and Turku (PK); and the Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio (RJ), Finland. Address reprint requests to J Montonen, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 160, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (JM, PK, AA, and AR); the Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki and Turku (PK); and the Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio (RJ), Finland. Search for other works by this author on: From the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (JM, PK, AA, and AR); the Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki and Turku (PK); and the Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio (RJ), Finland. Search for other works by this author on: From the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (JM, PK, AA, and AR); the Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki and Turku (PK); and the Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio (RJ), Finland. Search for other works by this author on: From the National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (JM, PK, AA, and AR); the Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki and Turku (PK); and the Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio (RJ), Finland. Search for other works by this author on: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 77, Issue 3, 1 March 2003, Pages 622629, Jukka Montonen, Paul Knekt, Ritva Jrvinen, Arpo Aromaa, Antti Reunanen; Whole-grain and fiber intake and the incidence of type 2 diabetes, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 77, Issue 3, 1 March 2003, Pages 6 Continue reading >>

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men

Whole-grain Intake And The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study In Men

Whole-grain intake and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in men From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Address reprint requests to TT Fung, Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, 300 The Fenway, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston. Search for other works by this author on: From the Programs in Nutrition, Simmons College, Boston (TTF); the Departments of Nutrition (TTF, FBH, MJS, and WCW) and Epidemiology (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and the Department of Medicine, Children's Hospital, Boston (MAP); and the Division of Preventive Medicine (SL) and the Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine (FBH, MJS, GAC, and WCW), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard M Continue reading >>

Whole Grains–type 2 Diabetes Health Claim — What Your Colleagues Think About It And The Reasons Behind The Decision

Whole Grains–type 2 Diabetes Health Claim — What Your Colleagues Think About It And The Reasons Behind The Decision

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 16 No. 1 P. 10 The recent headlines announcing the FDA’s approval of a qualified health claim that links whole grain consumption to a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes seemed, at first glance, to be a major announcement and a progressive move for improving Americans’ health. Companies finally could communicate that whole grains and foods containing whole grains that meet nutrient requirements outlined by the FDA may lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. But there’s more to this story than what meets the eye. Requirements The FDA requires that a petition be filed for each potential health claim so the agency can weigh the available evidence. In this case, ConAgra Foods, the maker of the first 100% white whole wheat flour, filed a petition with the agency in January 2012 seeking approval of one or both of the following health claims to be used on packages of whole grain foods: • “Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include three servings (48 grams) of whole grains per day may reduce the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2.” • “Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove, that whole grains (three servings or 48 grams per day), as part of a low saturated fat, low cholesterol diet, may reduce the risk of diabetes mellitus type 2.” The FDA approved the following wording options: • “Whole grains may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, although the FDA has concluded that there is very limited scientific evidence for this claim.” • “Whole grains may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. FDA has concluded that there is very limited scientific evidence for this claim.” As one of the largest grain-milling companies in the world, ConAgra sells Ultragrain Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

To Eat Or Not To Eat: Whole Grains

To Eat Or Not To Eat: Whole Grains

Not all health foods are necessary for good health, especially if they raise blood sugar. These days, even in mainstream markets, you can find spelt, millet, barley, and the like. And the marketing messages leaping off of every loaf of bread and cereal box shout, whole grains! Additionally, every healthy-eating article has authors singing the praises of whole grains, citing all kinds of studies showing that eating these wonder foods will reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and more. However, the research supporting the benefits of these popular foods isnt as strong as you might think. And theres another side to whole grains thats important to keep in mind if you have diabetes: They can significantly raise blood sugar. A 2013 study of people with type 2 diabetes found that most whole-grain breads raised blood sugar and insulin levels just as much as bread made from refined white flour. The exception was pumpernickel, which increased blood sugar less than other types, but caused it to remain above the healthy 140 mg/dL range. Many observational studies have shown a decreased risk of diabetes, heart disease, and other serious health conditions in people who eat whole grains regularly. However, this only demonstrates a link between whole grain consumption and disease risk reduction . People who eat a lot of whole grains tend to have healthier eating and lifestyle habits overall. They typically consume very little junk food, and engage in regular exercise more often than those who never eat whole grains. Though its true that whole grains can be a good source of fiber, there are many other fiber-rich foods that have less of an impact on blood sugar. In fact, whole grains arent even that high in fiber when compared with other, lower-carb foods . For instance, a cup of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Diabetes Power Foods: Whole Grains And Fiber

Imagine this food: It's low in calories. It makes you feel full. And you can eat as much of it as you want. Too good to be true? It's fiber and it is real. You can find it in fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, and whole grains. Most everyone should eat more fiber -- especially if you have diabetes. Even though fiber is a carbohydrate, your body can’t break it down. This means you don’t digest fiber, and it doesn't raise your blood sugar. And as fiber moves through your body, it helps with digestion, makes you feel full, and may help control your cholesterol and blood sugar levels. How Much Fiber? Think you eat enough fiber? Chances are you could stand to eat more. Men over age 50 should get at least 30 grams of fiber each day and women over 50 at least 21 grams daily. Most of us get less than recommended. There are lots of delicious ways to add fiber to your diet, but the key is to do it slowly. This will help prevent gas and bloating. Drinking more water can help, too. Eat Your Whole Grains Whole grains are loaded with fiber. Look for breads, cereals, tortillas, and crackers that have whole wheat flour, whole-grain cornmeal, whole oats, whole rye, or buckwheat flour on the ingredients list. Here are some tasty ways to add more whole grains to your diet: Start the day with a half-cup of high-fiber bran cereal topped with banana slices or berries (12 grams of fiber) or a whole wheat English muffin (4.4 grams). Choose whole wheat pasta (3 grams) over white. Serve it with your favorite vegetables for even more fiber. Make a sandwich on whole-grain bread. (Chose bread with 2 or 3 grams of fiber a slice.) Try recipes that use other types of whole grains, such as barley or bulgur (3 to 4 grams). Have brown rice or wild rice (3.5 grams) instead of white. Sprinkle with fres Continue reading >>

Cereal Grains, Legumes And Diabetes.

Cereal Grains, Legumes And Diabetes.

Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, New Zealand. [email protected] Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Nov;58(11):1443-61. This review examines the evidence for the role of whole grain foods and legumes in the aetiology and management of diabetes. MedLine and SilverPlatter ('Nutrition' and 'Food Science FSTA') databases were searched to identify epidemiological and experimental studies relating to the effects of whole grain foods and legumes on indicators of carbohydrate metabolism. Epidemiological studies strongly support the suggestion that high intakes of whole grain foods protect against the development of type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM). People who consume approximately 3 servings per day of whole grain foods are less likely to develop T2DM than low consumers (<3 servings per week) with a risk reduction in the order of 20-30%. The role of legumes in the prevention of diabetes is less clear, possibly because of the relatively low intake of leguminous foods in the populations studied. However, legumes share several qualities with whole grains of potential benefit to glycaemic control including slow release carbohydrate and a high fibre content. A substantial increase in dietary intake of legumes as replacement food for more rapidly digested carbohydrate might therefore be expected to improve glycaemic control and thus reduce incident diabetes. This is consistent with the results of dietary intervention studies that have found improvements in glycaemic control after increasing the dietary intake of whole grain foods, legumes, vegetables and fruit. The benefit has been attributed to an increase in soluble fibre intake. However, prospective studies have found that soluble fibre intake is not associated with a lower incidence of T2DM. On the contrary, Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

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