diabetestalk.net

Government Policies On Diabetes

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws And Programs

Diabetes Health Coverage State Laws and Programs Diabetes Health Coverage: State Laws and Programs This is a policymaker and consumer guide to state insurance mandated coverage, Medicaid coverage and state-sponsored diabetes programs. It was published 2011and updated material was added January 2016 All state law diabetes mandates and minimum coverage requirements for state-regulated health insurance policies. The tables include the enacted state laws passedsince the firstmandates inCalifornia (1981) and New York (1993). Use links below to go directly to state-based information: State Medicaid diabetes coverage terms and conditions. All Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) diabetes coverage. Contact information and an overview of federal funding provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to state-sponsored diabetes prevention and control programs (DPCPs). DPCPs represent the front line in battling diabetes in most states. An overview of other state activities and initiatives, such as creation of diabetes coordinator positions in the executive branch to fight diabetes. Federal Health Reform.The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) signed March 2010, has led to changed and expanded coverage termed "EssentialHealth Benefits." Newly Released: NCSL Survey:Diabetes Drug coverage: A new survey of2016 Insurance Plans in 50 states, examining 1) patient access to the scores of diabetes drug treatments and2) results in the 46 states with laws mandating or offering diabetes coverage. NCSL original research, published summer 2016. [Read the report] December 2015: " Diabetes: Addressing the Costs; A 50-State Budget Survey for FY 2014 ." NCSL released its latest diabetes report, taking a closer look at programs and budget appropriations that play a role in con Continue reading >>

Government Releases Diabetes National Service Framework Update

Government Releases Diabetes National Service Framework Update

Government releases Diabetes National Service Framework update Government releases Diabetes National Service Framework update The Department of Health has released its 'Six Years On: Delivering the Diabetes National Service Framework' report, which updates on the progress made since the National Service Framework (NSF) for Diabetes was developed in 2001, setting out national standards of care for people with diabetes. The Department of Health states that the report recognises key achievements made in the last year, including completion of the first survey to establish how many children and young people have diabetes in England, and also identifies areas where improvement is still needed to help direct diabetes services over the coming years. Commenting on the content of the report, Stella Valerkou, Senior Policy Officer at Diabetes UK said: "This report identifies some great achievements in working towards delivering the NSF standards. "However, our recent survey of people with diabetes demonstrates that 64 per cent of adults and 74 per cent of children have not attended a course to help them manage their diabetes. "People with diabetes have outlined some key improvements that they would like made to diabetes services, which include the interventions they require to support them to self manage. "It remains clear that more work is needed if the delivery of high-quality diabetes care, meeting the vision and standards of the NSF, is to be established throughout England and we look forward to the progress of further work programmes in the coming year that will help to achieve this." Continue reading >>

A New Approach To Tackling Type 2 Diabetes Is A Step Forward For Prevention

A New Approach To Tackling Type 2 Diabetes Is A Step Forward For Prevention

As waistlines continue to expand across the country (62% of adults are overweight or obese), diagnoses of Type 2 diabetes are also rising. The cost of treating diabetes, and associated complications such as heart disease and stroke, is costing the NHS around £10bn every year. Trends are only going one way – with one in ten adults expected to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes by 2034. And we know the risks – those who are overweight, physically inactive or have a family history of diabetes are at increased risk of developing the condition, as are people of South Asian, African, and African-Caribbean descent and less affluent individuals and populations. With 5 million people in England at high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, we urgently need to see a major drive towards diabetes prevention in the UK, and the launch of Healthier You: the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme represents an important step forward. The programme aims to identify those at high risk and refer them into evidence-based behavioural interventions to help them reduce that risk through achieving and/or maintaining a healthy weight, recommended levels of activity and a healthy, balanced diet. It’s an important part of a wider range of work to tackle a disease that is already a huge burden on the NHS, by shrinking the numbers of people living with Type 2 diabetes in the future. An evidence-based solution We published a systematic review in August last year that examined the effectiveness of ‘real-world’ interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes in high risk populations. The review looked closely at the following areas: The effectiveness of diabetes prevention programmes on reducing cases of Type 2 diabetes and reducing weight in high risk populations The population groups that see Continue reading >>

Public Policy Position Statements

Public Policy Position Statements

About > Public Policy Position Statements People with diabetes face many issues that have serious and long-term effects on their physical, emotional and financial quality of life. Diabetes Canada works to lead the fight against diabetes by helping people with diabetes live healthy lives while we work to find a cure. It encourages a healthy lifestyle as the best method of prevention, and represents the interests of those with diabetes to government, business, and the public. An effective diabetes health-care plan requires a multi-faceted approach that attacks barriers of cost, access and education/information with equal force. The following position statements offer a starting point for effective action. Section A: Diabetes Medication, Supplies and Medical Devices People with diabetes experience heavy medical and financial burdens. To ease these burdens, to ensure an optimal quality of life, and to possibly prevent or delay costly and devastating complications, people with diabetes deserve equal and affordable access to the best possible medication, supplies and medical devices, regardless of where they live in Canada. Continue reading >>

Advocacy Tools & Resources

Advocacy Tools & Resources

Gain information and take action to influence the future of diabetes education and the role of the diabetes educator in health care. AADE works to advance policies that support the work of the diabetes educator, reinforce the critical importance of diabetes education, and remove barriers that may affect a person with diabetes from self-managing their diabetes. We support our members as they engage in state and federal initiatives to advocate for people with diabetes and the important role of the diabetes educator in the delivery of diabetes care. Download our Advocacy Guide , which features tips on how to take action on a wide range of advocacy issues, including identifying your members of Congress and opportunities for CB involvement in advocacy. Subscribe to the Advocacy Forum on My AADE Network. Connect with advocates, find out the latest advocacy news, post your questions, and get the latest information on AADEs advocacy initiatives through our blog posts and other resources. Check out AADE's latest Advocacy Update. This details AADE's advocacy activities in the past quarter. Get help communicating the facts of DSMT with your members of Congress and find valuable resources for your State and Federal Advocacy efforts. Continue reading >>

National Strategy And Policy To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

National Strategy And Policy To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

National strategy and policy to prevent type 2 diabetes Your responsibility when using NICE advice This interactive flowchart covers preventing type 2 diabetes using interventions aimed at individuals, populations and communities. Preventing type 2 diabetes involves adopting a healthy, balanced diet, achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and reducing the time spent being sedentary. Successful prevention involves a comprehensive approach that combines population and community-based interventions with interventions targeted at people who are at high risk. At the population or community level, action is recommended as part of an integrated package of local measures to promote health and prevent a range of non-communicable diseases, including cardiovascular disease and some cancers. National action is also recommended to address the adverse environmental factors driving the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes. The focus is on early intervention among high-risk groups and the general population (adults under 74, in particular, those from black and minority ethnic groups and those from lower socioeconomic groups ). At an individual level, the recommendations focus on how to identify adults who are at high risk and provide them with a quality-assured, evidence-based, intensive lifestyle-change programme . The recommendations for high risk individuals can be used alongside the NHS Health Check programme. 14 September 2017 New recommendations on intensive lifestyle-change programmes and metformin for people at risk of type 2 diabetes have been added to high risk , risk identification and intensive lifestyle-change programmes and offer metformin or orlistat to support lifestyle change as the NICE guideline on type 2 diabetes: prevention in peop Continue reading >>

The Government's Response To Obesity And Diabetes Is Insulting

The Government's Response To Obesity And Diabetes Is Insulting

The government's response to obesity and diabetes is insulting With diabetes already consuming 10% of NHS resources and one child in four too heavy, the need to do something is urgent Last modified on Wed 20 Sep 2017 18.13EDT Doctors are increasingly concerned about the impact of poor diet on the nations health.Photograph: Ryan Donnell for the Guardian Theresa May during her leadership campaign to become prime minister said she wanted to tackle health inequalities. As prime minister she could help protect the next generation from diseases like type 2 diabetes, cancer, as well as reduce the crippling burden of obesity on the NHS. Instead, we have an insulting response by her administration to the UK crisis in obesity and type 2 diabetes both in children and adults. The government, heavily influenced by food and drinks lobbyists, has rowed back on its promises by announcing what looks like a weak plan rather than the robust strategy it promised. It lacks any meaningful action and instead sings from the old hymn sheet about physical activity, personal responsibility, and voluntary product reformulation. What is needed is a level of intervention, regulation and enforcement by the state that is at least on a par with seatbelt use and not smoking indoors. What's the answer to tackling childhood obesity? Share your thoughts In 2004, the World Health Organisation declared obesity a global epidemic. Twelve years later the statistics tell us that not only are we failing to tackle the issue, but its getting worse. There are now one million morbidly obese people in Britain . Trends suggest that without effective intervention nine out of 10 adults, and six out of 10 children, will be overweight or obese by 2050 (pdf). The association between diet and heart disease and cancer is irr Continue reading >>

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act

The State Of Diabetes Prevention Policy In The Usa Following The Affordable Care Act

The State of Diabetes Prevention Policy in the USA Following the Affordable Care Act 1Preventive Medicine Residency, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, 1900 W Polk Street, Room 901, Chicago, IL 60612, USA Find articles by Juleigh Nowinski Konchak 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 3American Medical Association, Improving Health Outcomes, 330 N Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 1Preventive Medicine Residency, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, 1900 W Polk Street, Room 901, Chicago, IL 60612, USA 2Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, 750 N. Lake Shore Drive, Suite 680, Chicago, IL 60611, USA 3American Medical Association, Improving Health Outcomes, 330 N Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611, USA The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Curr Diab Rep See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Type 2 diabetes is a major public health problem in the USA, affecting over 12 % of American adults and imposing considerable health and economic burden on individuals and society. There is a strong evidence base demonstrating that lifestyle behavioral changes and some medications can prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in high risk adults, and several policy and healthcare system changes motivated by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) have the potential to accelerate diabetes prevention. I Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

Diabetes Prevention In Michigan

At the Michigan Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, we work with partners across the state to educate and inform the public and health care providers about the facts on diabetes prevention and provide links to resources. The Michigan Diabetes Prevention Action Plan, 2016-2018 represents best thinking of public health professionals and interested citizens concerned about the burden of diabetes and prediabetes within our state. The plan includes three strategic areas of focus and targeted goals and objectives to reduce the burden of prediabetes in Michigan. For more information, contact Tamah Gustafson at [email protected] What is prediabetes? Who is at high risk? Prediabetes is a condition where people have a blood glucose level slightly higher than normal, but not yet considered diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes can be prevented! Research shows that people with prediabetes and those at high risk could significantly reduce their risk of diabetes by making modest lifestyle changes–lose 5-7% body weight and be physically active at least 150 minutes a week (at least 5 days, 30 minutes of moderate physical activity). Just making these changes for life, goes a long way to lower risk of diabetes. Some other risk factors for diabetes are: being over overweight or obese, not physically active, older than 45 years, having family history or a history of gestational diabetes. Learn your risk by taking this simple test or Take the Quiz at cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/ (on right side of page) What is the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP)? The good news is that people with prediabetes may delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and possibly return their blood glucose levels to normal by participating in a national program called the National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP). This e Continue reading >>

Government Action On Diabetes Prevention: Time To Try Something New

Government Action On Diabetes Prevention: Time To Try Something New

Government action on diabetes prevention: time to try something new Jenny C Kaldor, Roger S Magnusson and Stephen Colagiuri Med J Aust 2015; 202 (11): 578-580. || doi: 10.5694/mja14.01611 Type 2 diabetes mellitus, driven by overweight and obesity linked to unhealthy diets, is the fastest-growing non-communicable disease in Australia. Halting the rise of diabetes will require a paradigm shift from personal to shared responsibility, with greater accountability from Australian governments and the food industry. It will also require governments to try something different to the prevailing approaches emphasising education and the provision of information. We propose four priority areas where government regulation could strengthen Australia's response. Those areas relate to mandatory front-of-pack food labelling, regulating junk food advertising, better oversight of food reformulation and taxing sugar-sweetened beverages. Diabetes mellitus is the fastest-growing non-communicable disease (NCD) in Australia. Around one in 25 adults has type 2 diabetes, and half do not manage their condition effectively. 1 By 2023, diabetes will account for around 9% of Australia's burden of disease, compared with 5% in 2003. 2 Health spending on diabetes has been predicted to rise by 400% between the 200203 and 203233 financial years, reaching $7 billion. 2 The rising burden of diabetes is largely due to rising rates of overweight and obesity, to which poor diet is a key contributor. In 2013, Australia and other members of the World Health Assembly committed to a range of global goals for reducing the burden of NCDs, including a halt in the rise of diabetes. Achieving these ambitious goals will require a paradigm shift from personal responsibility to shared responsibility, as well as greater a Continue reading >>

Who Emro | Policy Statement And Recommended Actions For Lowering Sugar Intake And Reducing Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity In The Eastern Mediterranean Region | Strategy | Nutrition

Who Emro | Policy Statement And Recommended Actions For Lowering Sugar Intake And Reducing Prevalence Of Type 2 Diabetes And Obesity In The Eastern Mediterranean Region | Strategy | Nutrition

WHO EMRO | Policy statement and recommended actions for lowering sugar intake and reducing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region | Strategy | Nutrition Nutrition | Strategy/policy | Policy statement and recommended actions for lowering sugar intake and reducing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region Policy statement and recommended actions for lowering sugar intake and reducing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity in the Eastern Mediterranean Region Lower sugar intake and reduce prevalence of type 2 diabetes and obesity, in order to reduce the risk of noncommunicable diseases in children and adults, with a particular focus on the prevention of unhealthy weight gain and associated conditions, such as diabetes and dental caries. The policy is based on the WHO guidelines specifying that all individuals children and adults should consume less than 10%, or preferably 5%, of free sugars in their diet1. Given the extraordinarily high rates of obesity and diabetes in the Region, 5% is seen as the most appropriate long-term goal. Free sugars include mono-saccharides and disaccharides added to foods and beverages by the manufacturer, cook or consumer, and sugars naturally present in honey, syrups, fruit juices and fruit juice concentrates. This will require a major change in food intake patterns and the proposed new low sugar goal of 5% will, realistically, require radical new policies as intakes are known to be far higher than 5% in most, if not all, countries of the Region. Policy-makers and programme managers are now advised to assess current free sugar intake levels and their sources in both foods and drinks and consider how to develop nationwide measures that result in a transformation of th Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

The importance of both diabetes and these comorbidities will continue to increase as the population ages. Therapies that have proven to reduce microvascular and macrovascular complications will need to be assessed in light of the newly identified comorbidities. Lifestyle change has been proven effective in preventing or delaying the onset of type 2 diabetes in high-risk individuals. Based on this, new public health approaches are emerging that may deserve monitoring at the national level. For example, the Diabetes Prevention Program research trial demonstrated that lifestyle intervention had its greatest impact in older adults and was effective in all racial and ethnic groups. Translational studies of this work have also shown that delivery of the lifestyle intervention in group settings at the community level are also effective at reducing type 2 diabetes risk. The National Diabetes Prevention Program has now been established to implement the lifestyle intervention nationwide. Another emerging issue is the effect on public health of new laboratory based criteria, such as introducing the use of A1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes or for recognizing high risk for type 2 diabetes. These changes may impact the number of individuals with undiagnosed diabetes and facilitate the introduction of type 2 diabetes prevention at a public health level. Several studies have suggested that process indicators such as foot exams, eye exams, and measurement of A1c may not be sensitive enough to capture all aspects of quality of care that ultimately result in reduced morbidity. New diabetes quality-of-care indicators are currently under development and may help determine whether appropriate, timely, evidence-based care is linked to risk factor reduction. In addition, the scientific evid Continue reading >>

State Plan To Control Diabetes In Texas

State Plan To Control Diabetes In Texas

Statewide Assessment of Existing Programs for the Prevention and Treatment of DiabetesDecember 2014 (PDF 4 mb) Chapter 103 of the Health and Safety Code requires the Texas Diabetes Council (TDC) to develop and implement a state plan for diabetes treatment, education, and training. Changing the Course, A Plan to Prevent and Control Diabetes in Texas, features the TDC's strategic plan for 2012-2013 and ways state agencies are applying TDC priorities and goals to development of health policy, community-based diabetes programs, education and awareness campaigns, and continuing education for healthcare professionals. The TDCs Strategic Plan for 2012-2013 includes five priority areas: Advancing Public Policy Affecting Diabetes Evaluating the Impact of Diabetes in Texas Promoting Comprehensive Programs for the Prevention of Diabetes Increasing Public Awareness, Promoting Community Outreach and Diabetes Education Improving Diabetes Care and Prevention of Complications by Health Care Professionals The TDC submits its plan to the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS), with copies provided to the Texas Legislature. The Diabetesin Texas sectionprovides estimated diabetes prevalence and mortality data for the state, as well as statistics on complications and direct and indirect costs. State agencies affected by the plan are required to report on implementation of the plan to the TDC, the Legislative Budget Board, and the Governors Office of Budget and Planning. Reports received by the TDC, including activities of the DSHS Diabetes Prevention and Control Branch, are presented in the Activities and Services Update section. Texas Medicaid, the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services, and DSHS provide numbers ofTexans with diabetes served and related costs. Continue reading >>

How Health Policies Are Impacting Diabetes Diagnoses

How Health Policies Are Impacting Diabetes Diagnoses

How health policies are impacting diabetes diagnoses The Affordable Care Act (ACA), signed into law five years ago, is credited with expanding health insurance coverage in the United States, according to reports published last month by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Government Accountability Office. The data shows that 13% of American adults were uninsured in March 2015, compared to 20% when the ACAs first open-enrollment period occurred in October 2013. But lowering the number of people who are uninsured was never in and of itself the end goal of the ACA. The ACA was premised on the theory that expanded access to health insurance would facilitate greater access to health services, thereby leading to earlier detection and treatment of disease for a larger number of people. With earlier diagnosis and treatment come better health outcomes and lower costs, both for the individual and society as a whole. As a physician, an active member of the board of the American Diabetes Association Research Foundation, and a patient with Type 2 diabetes for 20 years, many of my personal and professional goals have focused on controlling diabetes, educating others, and contributing to the development of drugs to treat diabetes, one of our countrys most prevalent chronic diseases. I have been greatly influenced by the wide body of research which demonstrates that improved outcomes in diabetes care are associated with identification and intervention at the earliest, and thereby most treatable, stages of the disease. While the ACA has been the subject of five years of spirited dialogue, new evidence is emerging that suggests expanded access to care under the ACA may be having an impact on early identification of diabetes. A new study published in Diabetes Car Continue reading >>

Dpcp Overview

Dpcp Overview

Connecticut Diabetes Prevention and Control Program The mission of the Connecticut Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (DPCP) is to create a comprehensive system of care for the prevention and treatment of diabetes. Our goal is to reduce the incidence or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes and its complications and enhance the quality of life for people affected by diabetes. History: Since 1994, with the funding and support of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (CDC), the CT DPCP has worked with partners to increase diabetes awareness to the residents of Connecticut and to provide diabetes information to health care professionals. These efforts are aligned and coordinated with the Ten Essential Public Health Services and the Chronic Care Model. Program Goals: The Connecticut DPCP serves as a convener of the diabetes public health system. The CT DPCP strives to provide networking opportunities to members of the diabetes system of care in order to examine diabetes issues statewide and to share program successes. Specific goals are based on priorities established by the CDC and include: Promote awareness of and programs for pre-diabetes among people at high risk for type 2 diabetes Promote participation in American Diabetes Association (ADA) recognized or American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) accredited and/or Stanford licensed diabetes self-management education (DSME) programs Increase use of chronic disease self-management programs in community settings Administrative goals for the DPCP include: Collaboration and coordination with other chronic disease programs. Provision of training and technical assistance to health care workers, community based organizations and others working on diabetes projects and policy. Promotion of social, environme Continue reading >>

More in diabetes