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Gluten Intolerance And Diabetes Type 2

Too Little Gluten In Our Diet May Increase The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Too Little Gluten In Our Diet May Increase The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with celiac disease or who are gluten intolerant may benefit from a low-gluten diet. A considerable number of people who do not have these diseases still adopt a gluten-free diet in the hope that it benefits their health. New research, however, suggests that a low-gluten diet may even have some adverse health effects, by raising the risk of diabetes. Gluten is a protein mainly found in wheat, barley, and rye, as well as baked goods and other foods that contain these cereals. People with celiac disease - an autoimmune disorder affecting at least 3 million people in the United States - avoid gluten because their immune system responds to it by attacking the small intestine. However, more and more people are adopting a gluten-free diet, despite its health benefits being unclear. In fact, some nutritionists advise against avoiding gluten. Instead, they recommend a well-balanced diet that includes fruit and vegetables, as well as whole-grain wheat and other foods containing gluten. New research - presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle 2017 Scientific Sessions - suggests that a low-gluten diet may have adverse health effects by raising the risk of type 2 diabetes. Studying the link between gluten consumption and type 2 diabetes Geng Zong, Ph.D. - one of the study's authors and a research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, MA - explains the motivation behind the study: We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more." The team approximated the glute Continue reading >>

Cryptic Gluten Intolerance In Type 1 Diabetes: Identifying Suitable Candidates For A Gluten Free Diet

Cryptic Gluten Intolerance In Type 1 Diabetes: Identifying Suitable Candidates For A Gluten Free Diet

Long term exposure to gluten in coeliacs,1 and coeliac disease (CD) diagnosis after 16 years of age2 may induce type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune disorders. Increased prevalence of CD among diabetics and their relatives is well documented.3 Early introduction of gluten to children at high risk for T1D produces T1D associated islet autoantibodies.4 Similarly, in the absence of overt clinical symptoms of T1D, some coeliac children produce diabetes autoantibodies in a gluten dependent manner.5 In diabetics, intestinal challenge with gluten produces mucosal recruitment of lymphocytes,6 similar to that in CD patients.7 In diabetics, however, there is no production of CD related anti‐tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti‐tTG).6 We have used a phage display assay8 to show that in CD patients, production of anti‐tTG is limited to the intestine. Here, we monitored the effects of a gluten free diet (GFD) on anti‐tTG antibody synthesis in the intestinal mucosa of a diabetic adult and a boy at high risk of diabetes, both carrying HLA DQ2/DQ8, but lacking serum anti‐tTG. Intestinal specimens from both subjects and samples of peripheral blood lymphocytes were used to make phage‐antibody libraries8 to look for lymphocytes synthesising anti‐tTG antibodies. Patient No 1 was a 35 year old man who had T1D for 20 years. During 1998–2001, serum anti‐tTG responses were negative, and clinical control of T1D was good (mean glycosylated haemoglobin 6.8% (range 8.1–6.1) but the patient developed surgically treated diabetic retinopathy and microalbuminuria, with an average albumin excretion rate (AER) of 230 μg/min, despite treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors. In 2001, “burning” epigastric pain appeared with abdominal distension. Duodenal b Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets Are Not Actually Linked To Diabetes

In the pantheon of fad diets, there is perhaps none more hated on than gluten-free. And despite how annoying fad dieters are (if I hear one more person order a salad because they’re ‘gluten-free’ and then ask for croutons…), it’s not unreasonable to want to avoid foods that might possibly be bad for you. But is gluten actually bad for people who don’t have a problem with it? There’s no real evidence that avoiding gluten leads to tangible health benefits, assuming that you don’t have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity. But there also haven’t been many studies that actually asked that question—there’s just not much information out there. On Thursday we got some preliminary answers...kind of. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done People who eat low gluten diets are at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, according to results presented on Thursday at the American Heart Association Meeting. It’s crucial to point out here that these researchers weren’t looking at people on gluten-free diets. The researchers were only studying associations between eating less gluten and getting diabetes. Their study size was massive—199,794 people—because they looked at data f Continue reading >>

Does Gluten Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Probably Not

Does Gluten Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Probably Not

A recent analysis of a massive study observing the effect of food on the health of nearly 200,000 American health professionals suggested eating more gluten was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. But is it really this simple? Can gluten be linked to diabetes? A considerable amount of published research has looked at the potential links between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes (a chronic condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin). This has led to the discovery that they often share similar genetic markers linked to the immune system. Another recent study found that although coeliac disease was more common in people with type 1 diabetes there were no more cases of coeliac disease in people with type 2 diabetes (which usually presents in adulthood, and is typically associated with lifestyle factors) than the general population. However, while studies in animals suggest gluten may increase risk of developing type 1 diabetes, human studies do not. A large review investigating when infants are first given gluten and their risk of developing type 1 diabetes found no link, unless infants were fed solids in their first three months, which is much younger than the six months recommended by the World Health Organisation. And in animal studies of type 2 diabetes, it has been suggested gluten may increase the risk of developing diabetes. How reliable are the study results? Mice studies are interesting, but we need to look at data from people. This is typically done in either clinical trials, which can assess causality (that one thing caused the other), or by observing groups, which identify associations only (two things happened together, but one didn’t necessarily cause the other). This new study fits into the latter. The study looked at data fro Continue reading >>

Study Finds Low-gluten Diets Linked To Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Study Finds Low-gluten Diets Linked To Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

March 9 (UPI) -- Researchers from Harvard University found that a low- or gluten-free diet may increase a person's risk for developing type 2 diabetes. The research findings were presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, and gives bread and baked goods their elasticity during the baking process. Celiac disease is a gluten intolerance or gluten sensitivity in people and is linked to type 1 diabetes. The availability of gluten-free products has increased in recent years, however, many people without Celiac disease are using gluten-free products more and more. Research has shown that reducing gluten consumption in people without Celiac disease provides no long-term health benefits. "We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten," Geng Zong, a research fellow in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said in a press release. "Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients [vitamins and minerals], making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. People without Celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes." The large cohort study included data from three previous studies consisting of 4.24 million people followed from 1984-90 to 2010-13. Researchers found most participants had gluten intake below 12 grams per day, and within that range, people who ate the most gluten had lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes during the 30 years of follow-up. Participants who ate less gluten also tended to eat less ce Continue reading >>

Study Finds Link Between Gluten-free Diet And Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Study Finds Link Between Gluten-free Diet And Type 2 Diabetes Risk

contrary to popular belief, gluten is not actually the devil. Teri Virbickis/Shutterstock Most dietitians and doctors will tell you, a varied diet is key to being healthy. And seeing as they are actual qualified experts and not Instagram or blog-based advocates, you should be listening to them and not the latter. A new study has found that adopting a gluten-free or low-gluten diet can enhance your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The major study from Harvard University, which was presented yesterday at a meeting of the American Heart Association in Portland, reviewed 30 years’ worth of medical data from 200,000 participants, and found that those who limited their gluten intake or avoided it completely actually had a 13 percent higher chance of developing type 2 diabetes. "We wanted to determine if gluten consumption will affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten,” explained Dr Geng Zong of Harvard’s School of Public Health. “Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more." Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and other related grains. It is the protein that gives baked goods that chewy texture and elasticity in the baking process. Those who are genuinely intolerant have an autoimmune condition known as celiac disease, where their immune system responds to the gluten protein by attacking the small intestine. Only about 1 percent of the population is diagnosed as celiacs. In the study, researchers used data from the Nurses Health Study, where 199,794 people answered food-related questions every two to four years. They found participants consumed on average around 6-7 grams of gluten a day. Over the 30-year follow-up period, 15,942 ca Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets May Be Tied To An Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gluten-free Diets May Be Tied To An Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Gluten-free diets are all the rage, but shunning gluten may offer no benefit to overall health for most people, a new analysis suggests. In fact, the people in the study who ate more gluten were 13 percent less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study than those who ate less gluten, the researchers found. For some individuals, there are health reasons to avoid gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. Certain people, for example, have an intolerance to gluten, which can lead to abdominal pain, bloating or fatigue. Others have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder that affects mostly the small intestine; when people with this disease eat gluten, their immune system responds by attacking the intestine’s lining. However, even some people who do not have celiac disease or an intolerance to gluten believe that gluten-free diets are healthier than those that include gluten products, and the researchers wanted to see whether this belief might have any scientific merit, said lead study author Geng Zong, a nutrition research fellow at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. In the study, the researchers looked at surveys conducted every two to four years in which nearly 200,000 people reported what they ate. The researchers estimated the participants’ gluten intake based on this information, and then looked at which participants went on to develop Type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study period. Type 2 — the most common form of diabetes — occurs when the body has lost the ability to use insulin efficiently. This inability leads to high blood sugar levels, which can damage blood vessel walls, nerves and other tissues. The researchers focused on studying the participants’ risk of diabetes because this cond Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets Adopted By Rising Number Of Consumers Enhance Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Harvard Study

Gluten-free Diets Adopted By Rising Number Of Consumers Enhance Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: Harvard Study

Gluten-free diets adopted by increasing numbers of health-conscious consumers actually enhance the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, scientists have warned. A major study by Harvard University suggests that ingesting only small amounts of gluten, or avoiding it altogether, increases the danger of diabetes by as much as 13 per cent. Rising numbers of consumers are banishing gluten from their daily diet, encouraged by fashionable “clean eating” gurus such as Jasmine and Melissa Hemsley. Gluten is found in wheat, rye and barley and gives food elasticity during the baking process. Only around 1 per cent of people are genuinely gluten-intolerant, a condition called celiac disease. However, some estimates put the proportion of adults adhering to gluten-free diets in the UK alone at more than 12 per cent. The researchers behind the new study have now suggested that people who are not celiacs should reconsider limiting their gluten intake. The Harvard team examined 30 years’ of medical data from nearly 200,000 patients. They found that most participants had a gluten intake of below 12 grams (0.4 oounces) a day, roughly the equivalent to two or three slices of wholemeal bread. Within this range, those eating the most gluten had a 13 per cent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with those eating just 4g a day. The study showed that those who ate less gluten also tended to eat less cereal fibre, a substance known to protect against diabetes, however this was adjusted for in the results. “Gluten-free foods often have less dietary fibre and other micronutrients [such as vitamins and minerals], making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more,” said Dr Geng Zong, a Harvard research fellow. It is estimated that more than four million people with Ty Continue reading >>

Going Gluten-free Won't Help You Avoid Diabetes

Going Gluten-free Won't Help You Avoid Diabetes

MORE Gluten-free diets are all the rage these days, but for most people, shunning gluten may offer no benefit to overall health, a new analysis suggests. In fact, the people in the study who ate more gluten were 13 percent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study than those who ate less gluten, the researchers found. Some people should not consume gluten — a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley — for health reasons. For example, some people have an intolerance to gluten, and others have Celiac disease, the researchers said. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that affects mostly the small intestine; when people with this disease eat gluten, their immune system responds by attacking the intestine's lining. A gluten intolerance, by contrast, means that a person experiences symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating or fatigue after eating gluten but does not actually have Celiac disease. However, even some people who do not have Celiac disease or an intolerance to gluten believe that gluten-free diets are healthier than those that include gluten products, and the researchers wanted to see whether this belief might have any scientific merit, said lead study author Geng Zong, a nutrition research fellow at Harvard University's T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. [Science You Can Eat: 10 Things You Didn't Know About Food] In the study, the researchers looked at surveys conducted every 2 to 4 years in which nearly 200,000 people reported what they ate. The researchers estimated the participants' gluten intake based on this information, and then looked at which participants went on to develop type 2 diabetes over the 30-year study period. Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — occurs when the body has los Continue reading >>

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac Disease And Diabetes

Coeliac disease is a lifelong condition where your immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. This immune reaction damages the lining of your gut, making it hard to absorb nutrients from food properly. Coeliac disease is more common in people with Type 1 diabetes because both are autoimmune conditions. Up to 10 per cent of people with coeliac disease also have Type 1 diabetes. If you have Type 2 diabetes you’re not at increased risk of coeliac disease as Type 2 diabetes isn’t an autoimmune condition. However, there are many people who have coeliac disease, but don’t know it. Here, we answer all your questions about the symptoms, treatment and management of coeliac disease and diabetes. What are the symptoms? They range from mild to severe and include: diarrhoea bloating nausea mouth ulcers tummy aches unexpected weight loss (but not in all cases) hair loss anaemia What is the treatment? Coeliac disease is not the same as having a food allergy or being sensitive to particular foods. The only treatment, once you have been diagnosed, is to cut gluten out of your diet completely for the rest of your life. How can I tell if a food contains gluten? New UK food labelling laws make it easier to choose gluten-free foods. By law, manufacturers must list the ingredients containing gluten in bold. These include wheat (including spelt, Kamut and seitan), triticale, barley and oats. Common foods and drinks that aren’t suitable for people with coeliac disease include: wheat barley (including products that contain malted barley, such as malted drinks, beers, ales, lagers and stouts) bulgar wheat couscous durum wheat einkorn emmer (also known as faro) khorasan wheat (commercially known as Kamut) pearl barley rye seitan semolina spelt triticale Can Continue reading >>

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Low-gluten Or Gluten-free Diets Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Does reduction in gluten consumption provide long-term health benefits? Gluten is a protein that is commonly found in wheat, rye and barley, which gives bread and other baked goods elasticity and a chewy texture. It is avoided in a small percentage of the population that cannot tolerate gluten due to Celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Gluten-free foods often contain less dietary fiber and other micronutrients, such as, vitamins and minerals, thus making them less nutritious and they also tend to cost more. However, recent popularity of gluten-free diets has been trending even among people without any health problems. A ‘Gluten-free’ diet has been interchangeably used to represent a ‘healthy diet.’ On the contrary, researchers have shown concern that it may actually lead to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D) over a period of few decades. Although there is no scientific evidence that low-gluten will contribute to diabetes, the scientists are concerned about the long-term health benefits with the reduction in gluten consumption. An analysis of a large study of U.S. health professionals observed the effects of food on health in nearly 200,000 subjects. The study suggested that gluten intake might not exert significant adverse effects on the incidence of T2D or excess weight gain. Thus, limiting gluten from the diet is unlikely to facilitate T2D prevention and may lead to reduced consumption of cereal fiber or whole grains that help reduce diabetes risk. The purpose of the study was to determine if gluten consumption would affect health in people with no apparent medical reasons to avoid gluten. A long-term observational study looked at the data from three big previously held studies that started 40 years ago with the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and continu Continue reading >>

Gluten Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Share Almost 20 percent of adults buy or consume foods labeled gluten-free, but only about 8 percent have a medical reason to avoid gluten, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. Others seem to be shunning gluten with the hope of losing weight or gaining energy. Some celebrities and popular diet books have demonised gluten, making gluten-free diets trendy for those with no medical reason for the restriction. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, RD, a dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore and chairperson of Dietitians in Gluten Intolerance Diseases. Some people incorrectly associate gluten-free with low-carbohydrate. Shoppers see “gluten-free” on labels and assume anything labeled free of something must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in sugar, saturated fats and sodium, making it a poor choice for most people, especially for those with diabetes. Why go gluten-free? The only current treatment for celiac disease and gluten sensitivity is a strict, lifelong gluten-free diet. Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population, but it is more common among people with type 1 diabetes. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms at diagnosis. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 percent of the population,” Cureton says. These individuals do not have intestinal damage, so they will not suffer nutritional deficiencies, she explains. However, a gluten-free diet is required to manage their symptoms, which may include joint pain, debilitating le Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Eating Right With Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Managing diabetes means monitoring your carbohydrate intake to help prevent spikes in your blood sugar levels. An additional diagnosis of celiac disease adds another layer of complexity to eating. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder in which people cannot tolerate gluten.1 Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—it helps dough rise and keep its shape and texture. Treatment of celiac includes eating a gluten-free diet. Common foods that are made with gluten include:2 pasta; bread; cereal; beverages such as beer; couscous; tortillas; crackers; cookies, cakes, muffins, and pastries; dressings, sauces, and gravies; and wheat-based flours such as white flour, wheat flour, kamut, semolina, spelt, and wheat bran. This list might seem overwhelming, but there are a variety of gluten-free versions of popular foods such as bread, pasta, and crackers that can be found in your local grocery store. For people with celiac and diabetes, however, it is important to consider the carb count—especially because many gluten-free foods are made with flours that contain less fiber and have a higher glycemic index. The golden rule? Get in the habit of checking the labels of anything you put in your mouth or on your skin (for both gluten and carbs). Hide-and-Seek with Gluten Labels can sometimes be deceiving. Just because something is labeled as “wheat-free” does not mean it is gluten-free. Always examine labels for buzz words such as wheat, barley, or rye, and if you have any questions, contact the manufacturer directly before eating. Certain additives in packaged foods contain traces of gluten—ask your healthcare provider or a registered dietitian nutritionist (RDN) who specializes in celiac disease for a complete list of unsafe ingredients and foods. It is also impo Continue reading >>

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