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Gluten Free High Sugar

Eat More Sugar!

Eat More Sugar!

You likely don’t agree that we should eat more sugar. Neither do I. Then why is the gluten-free industry promoting foods that are worse than table sugar? Gluten-free foods are made with: –Rice starch (or brown rice starch) –Tapioca starch –Cornstarch –Potato starch in place of wheat and gluten. People go gluten-free because of some real or perceived sensitivity to gluten, and they replace wheat and gluten with gluten-free foods. Big mistake. These gluten-free ingredients: —Send blood sugar sky-high. From a blood sugar standpoint, wheat is bad. Few foods are worse for blood sugar than wheat–except for gluten-free foods made with these junk carbohydrate ingredients. —Cause insulin resistance–the fundamental process that leads to diabetes. —Grow abdominal visceral fat–the inflamed fat, expressed on the surface as a “muffin top,” that causes hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. —Trigger high triglycerides–which thereby leads to formation of small LDL particles that cause heart attack. —Trigger the phenomena of glycation, i.e., glucose modification of proteins, that leads to cataracts, knee and hip arthritis, hypertension, and heart disease. I’ve said this before, but I will say it again: Conventional gluten-free foods are a big mistake. NOBODY SHOULD EAT GLUTEN-FREE FOODS, at least as they are currently conceived. You shouldn’t eat gluten-free processed foods if you have celiac disease. You shouldn’t eat gluten-free processed foods if you have gluten-sensitivity. You shouldn’t eat gluten-free processed foods if you are trying to be wheat-free. This causes confusion among many people. People with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity should avoid wheat and gluten sources (e.g., barley, rye, triticale, bulgur, oats), of co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Gluten Free Diet And Related Blood Sugar Levels

Gluten Free Diet And Related Blood Sugar Levels

A gluten-free diet not only helps those suffering from gluten intolerance, but may also help in preventing diabetes and stimulating weight loss. One of the ways that a gluten-free diet may improve health is through stabilizing blood sugar levels. Having stable blood sugar means less cravings for high carbohydrate and sugar-rich foods, which increase insulin levels. It also may translate into eating less food, since feeling ravenous often comes from experiencing low blood sugar. Video of the Day Gluten intolerance, or celiac, has become commonly known only over the last several years. The author of "The Gluten-Free Gourmet Cooks Comfort Foods," Bette Hagman, writes that that issues with gluten may have their roots in the agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago, as humans ate primarily meat, vegetables, and fruits before this time. Artaeus of Cappadocia wrote of symptoms relating to gluten in A.D. 250, and Samual Gee, M.D., wrote an article in 1880 identifying food as the probable cause of digestive symptoms. A gluten-free diet may help with stabilizing blood sugar levels. Removing foods that traditionally contain gluten, such as bread, cakes, cookies and beer also often brings down the sugar content of the diet. According to the book, "Living Gluten-Free For Dummies" by Danna Korn, eating a nutritious gluten-free diet means generally low-glycemic foods are ingested, which helps maintain blood sugar levels. High glycemic foods found in many wheat-based products stimulate insulin levels to rise quickly and then fall, which can eventually lead to illnesses such as diabetes. A gluten-free diet may help with several disorders related to blood sugar levels. Besides helping to prevent diabetes and low-blood sugar, according to the book, "Gluten-Free for a Healthy Life" by Kimb Continue reading >>

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

Going Gluten Free May Raise Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Study

If you don't have celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, here's one reason you might not want to give up bread entirely. Good news, bread lovers: Eating gluten may be one way to reduce your type 2 diabetes risk, according to preliminary research presented yesterday at an American Heart Association meeting in Portland, Oregon. The study authors say more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, but that their findings might be one reason to reconsider going gluten free. For people with celiac disease or a diagnosed gluten sensitivity, of course, going gluten free isn't optional. But this type of diet has become more popular in recent years in people without those conditions, even though there’s not much evidence that cutting out gluten—a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley—does much for long-term health. So Harvard researchers decided to investigate the link between gluten consumption and health outcomes, gathering data from three long-running studies involving nearly 200,000 people total. People in these studies filled out food-frequency questionnaires every two years, and also had their health monitored regularly. Over roughly three decades, more than 15,000 participants were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that most participants had gluten intakes below 12 grams a day, and that within this range, those on the higher end were less likely to develop diabetes. One reason that low gluten intake might be associated with higher diabetes risk was that people who ate less gluten also tended to eat less fiber, the researchers noticed. Controlling for this measure explained part of the disparity, but not all of it. Those in the highest percentile for gluten consumption still had a 13% lower diabetes risk than those in the lowest, who ate less Continue reading >>

Can Gluten-free Diet Cause Diabetes Or High Sugar Results?

Can Gluten-free Diet Cause Diabetes Or High Sugar Results?

Can Gluten-Free Diet Cause Diabetes Or High Sugar Results? Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes I'm not sure that I am posting in the correct forum or not, but...I have been gluten and dairy free for about 2 years now. I'm self-diagnosed as intolerant after having had a colon resection 4 yrs. ago and experiencing increasing difficulties since then. I've read a lot and educated myself a lot since that time and don't need a "certifica Continue reading >>

Maintaining Blood Sugar | The Gluten Connection

Maintaining Blood Sugar | The Gluten Connection

[twitter-follow screen_name=’kgalliett’ link_color=’00ccff’] That is a giant gummy bear in the picture. Consuming that would be 1 very bad way to regulate your blood sugar. Let’s talk about another… You probably know that if you eat foods that spike your blood sugar, that’s not good. You may not totally “get” why, but you get the idea…high blood sugar means you ate something that was sugary, and at some level, you know that is not good for you. Right? ok. So did you know this?…. Whole wheat bread raises your blood sugar MORE than 2 Tablespoons of sugar. It doesn’t matter if it’s fancy 9-grain or the weird wheat bread that is white (gotta trick those kiddies who only want white bread!) Whole wheat bread is a high glycemic index food, and was the main food cardiologist, Dr. William Davis, removed from his patients’ diets when he was trying to help them avoid obesity & its’ related diseases (namely, diabetes and heart disease). The curious side effect of doing this? His patients reported back in the following months with not just normalized blood sugars (diabetics became NON-diabetics, no sign of the disease at all & no more need for medication!) but they also reported back with: *major weight losses *skin rashes they’d had for decades were suddenly gone *acid reflux clearing up entirely, rheumatoid arthritis pain improved & disappeared *asthma symptoms were eliminated *deeper sleep & greater focus was reported *athletes reported more consistent performance *and even irritable bowel syndrome so severe a patient was looking at a colon removal – healed within 1 year Many of his patients were NOT intolerant to gluten based on a blood or saliva test – yet they STILL improved their overall health by removing wheat/gluten from their diet. Have Continue reading >>

Gluten: 5 Things You Need To Know

Gluten: 5 Things You Need To Know

Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Gluten is not something to fear, an expert says, and not everyone who is gluten-sensitive needs to be gluten-free. Gluten can cause health problems for some people Cutting back may be a better option than going gluten-free Eating gluten-free can cause weight gain and is expensive If you're confused by the gluten-free diet craze, you're not alone. Like many people, you've probably heard about the phenomenon but really don't understand what gluten is or what, if anything, you should be doing about it. Yet millions of people in this country are turning their lives upside-down trying to avoid it. Here are five things you need to know about gluten: 1. It's a protein that can cause problems. Gluten is the major protein found in some grains. It is present in all forms of wheat (bulgur, durum, semolina, spelt, farro and more) as well as in barley, rye and triticale (a wheat-rye cross). But gluten can also turn up in unexpected places, like certain brands of chocolate, imitation crab (surimi), deli meats, soy sauce, vitamins and even some kinds of toothpaste. Gluten is different from protein in other grains (such as rice) and in meat (such as steak) in that it is difficult for humans to digest completely. It can make some people very sick. But not everyone. 2. You probably don't need to completely avoid it. For some people -- about 1% of the population -- gluten can be a matter of life or death. These people have a condition known as celiac disease. Dana Vollmer battles gluten, wins gold 01:55 True celiacs, as they are called, are so sensitive to gluten that even a small amount -- really just a trace -- can make them very sick. Because gluten damages the lining of the small intestine in th Continue reading >>

Could A Gluten-free Diet Help Blood Sugar?

Could A Gluten-free Diet Help Blood Sugar?

Controlling blood sugar is of utmost importance to people with diabetes. This can be a frustrating task. Some people, like this writer, find it exceedingly difficult to bring blood glucose into a healthy range. What can they do to help blood sugar? Wrestling with Recalcitrant Blood Sugar: Q. I am diabetic. I am on an insulin pump and take two medications to control blood sugar. About a year ago, I could not get my blood sugar down below 225 no matter what I did. When I started getting diarrhea all the time, I thought I might have a gluten allergy so I went gluten free. That took care of the diarrhea, but here is the surprising part: it dropped my blood sugars over 100 points! My insulin dose is now lower and I’m getting consistently good blood sugar readings. Has anyone else reported that a gluten-free diet can help blood sugar? Avoiding Gluten to Help Blood Sugar: A. Several years ago we interviewed Richard Bernstein, MD, on our radio show. He is a type 1 diabetic who specializes in treating diabetes. He insists that a very low-carbohydrate diet, which might be achieved by going gluten free, can help control blood sugar. You can learn more about his perspective from his book, Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. If you think about the foods that are rich in gluten, you have bread, pasta, crackers, cookies, pretzels and beer. Simply substituting gluten-free versions for these high-carb foods might not help blood sugar, but avoiding them completely might be quite useful. Continue reading >>

Does A Gluten Free Diet Cause High Blood Sugar?

Does A Gluten Free Diet Cause High Blood Sugar?

A recent report came out after researchers presented findings at the American Heart Association. The media has been using this report to mislead and deter people away from the gluten free diet. In this video, Dr. Osborne goes into detail explaining how a TRUE gluten free diet can actually help with blood sugar issues… Continue reading >>

Gluten Free And Sugar Free

Gluten Free And Sugar Free

How to Live the Sweet Life Without Refined Sugar What does it mean to eat a sugar-free, gluten-free diet? Being “sugar free” is a relatively new concept, and how the diet works in each person’s life is unique. There are natural sugars in fruits and vegetables, and our bodies actually need certain sugars to survive. However, eliminating or greatly reducing refined sugars can significantly benefit health and longevity. Generally speaking, refined sugar includes processed white sugar made from sugarcane or sugar beets. It also includes brown sugar, which is white sugar coated with molasses. Because refined sugar is highly processed, our bodies absorb and process it almost immediately. When too much sugar is consumed, we experience a “sugar high” and soon after comes the blood sugar crash. Why avoid refined sugar? Type I, or insulin-dependent, diabetes occurs at an estimated rate of 5 to 10 percent in the celiac population compared to 0.5 percent in the general population. Researchers have determined that there is a causal genetic link between the two diseases. Both are autoimmune disorders, which tend to occur in pairs or clusters. Controlling Type I diabetes on a gluten-free diet poses particular challenges. Many processed gluten-free foods have a higher amount of added sugar and starch to help improve taste and compensate for the absence of gluten. Both are problematic for diabetics who need to control blood sugar. There are a myriad of other health problems that are linked to excess sugar in the diet, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and hypoglycemia. More recently, studies have been published suggesting that cancer, hypertension and heart disease are linked to excess sugar. Candida, a yeast overgrowth, is another condition that requir Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Foods High In Fat, Salt And Sugar

Gluten-free Foods High In Fat, Salt And Sugar

GLUTEN-FREE FOODS HIGH IN FAT, SALT AND SUGAR Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 04/07/2018 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts. We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt . And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat , sugar and salt. Continue reading >>

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Gluten And Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Although many people continue to buy gluten-free foods at grocery stores and restaurants, it appears the gluten-free trend is waning for those looking to lose weight or gain energy, according to Packaged Facts, a market research company. For those who have to restrict gluten for medical reasons, such as managing celiac disease, gluten-free foods are necessary. A key treatment for those with celiac disease, a recognized and diagnosable medical disorder, is to avoid gluten. But some celebrities and popular diet books have demonized gluten, elevating gluten-free diets to the mainstream. This exposure has led people with no medical reasons to attempt to eliminate gluten from their diets. “It’s caused a bit of hysteria,” says Pam Cureton, a registered dietitian at the Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. Some people incorrectly associate a gluten-free diet as synonymous with choosing to restrict the amount of carbohydrate they eat. Consumers see the gluten-free label on packaging and assume it must be better. Often, however, the gluten-free food is lower in nutrients and higher in added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, making it a less healthy choice for most people—especially for those with diabetes. Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance: What’s the Difference? Celiac disease, a chronic autoimmune intestinal disorder, affects about 1 percent of the general population. It’s about 8 percent more common among people with type 1 diabetes, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Celiac disease is characterized by intestinal damage, nutrient deficiencies, joint pain, severe fatigue, weakness, and infertility. Some people, however, have no obvious symptoms when they are diagnosed. Gluten sensitivity is more common than celiac disease. “It affects about 6 pe Continue reading >>

Heres Why A Gluten-free Diet Can Become Incredibly Unhealthy

Heres Why A Gluten-free Diet Can Become Incredibly Unhealthy

Heres Why A Gluten-Free Diet Can Become Incredibly Unhealthy Heres Why A Gluten-Free Diet Can Become Incredibly Unhealthy Dr. Hyman, Ive recently gone gluten-free, and Ive seen tons of replacements for traditionally gluten-laden foods, a writer recently emailed me. Im a little suspicious, but are any of these choices healthy? We are all aware thatgluten-free has become a major buzz term. Restaurants proudly offer options like gluten-free bread, and even mainstream supermarkets have whole aisles dedicated to the trend. Nearly everyone has jumped on the gluten-free bandwagon. I dont recommend this to everyone not at least until you understand a few facts and heres why. As a doctor who treats sick patients, I find that gluten often is a major cause of digestive, autoimmune, weight, mood and neurologic problems. While one would think that I would be 100% pro gluten-free, I want to be clear that there are some downsides to this trend. The biggest problem with demonizing a food substance is caused by the food industry. In a nutshell, this industry manipulates basic foods items and turns them into Frankenfoods. It does this by removing naturally derived ingredients and adding in other bad stuff to make up for loss of taste, consistency, etc. Witness the past popularities of, say, low-carb or fat-free diets and the so-called healthy fake foodstuffs that manufacturers invented to replace the foods containing the maligned ingredients. A low-carb fake food might be higher in trans-fat, artificial sweeteners and excessive amounts of sugar alcohols. And a fat-free food is surefire code for higher-sugar or artificial sweeteners. Likewise, as gluten-free gains popularity, food companies that are well-aware of a potential marketing opportunity turn out processed, sugary junk foods as Continue reading >>

Gluten-free And Healthy? Many Times The Answer Is No

Gluten-free And Healthy? Many Times The Answer Is No

This article is based on a presentation I gave to the Southern Arizona Celiac Support group entitled “It’s Gluten Free, but Is It Healthy?” in January. The gluten-free diet is one of the most talked-about and followed diets these days for good reason: It’s the nutritional answer for the growing number of people who realize they are gluten sensitive. It’s the best example we have of food as our best medicine. The vast majority of people who are gluten sensitive have experienced the amazing feeling of having longstanding bothersome or even debilitating symptoms dramatically improve or completely go away when they eliminate gluten from their diet. However, for all the good eating gluten free can do for those of us who are gluten sensitive, it can do plenty of harm if we eat gluten free the wrong way. Unfortunately, many people are doing that without realizing it. It’s common for people to experience a big improvement in health when they first go gluten free, and gradually develop unwanted, unhealthy weight gain or new health problems, such as diabetic or prediabetic blood sugar levels, the longer that they eat gluten free. In one study, 82 percent of people who went on a gluten-free diet gained weight in the first two years of eating that way, including 81 percent of the people in the study who were originally overweight. So, if the gluten-free diet is so therapeutic for so many, why does it often lead to unwanted weight gain, prediabetes or diabetes, and sometimes other conditions, such as new allergies? It’s because many “gluten-free” foods aren’t healthy over the long term for reasons that don’t have anything to do with gluten (although it’s important to be aware that many packaged foods that are labeled “gluten-free” aren’t really free of Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diet Loaded With Fat And Sugar But No Protein | Daily Mail Online

Gluten-free Diet Loaded With Fat And Sugar But No Protein | Daily Mail Online

Gluten-free substitute foods are bad for your waistline since they contain so much sugar and fat with scant protein, experts warn. Millions of people swap normal bread for gluten-free versions in a bid to stay trim. In fact, many parents have put their own children on this trendy diet, following the example of celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, Gisele Bundchen and Alicia Silverstone. But researchers from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition warn that the vast majority of gluten-free products are loaded with fattening substances, and miss out the benefits. The study, published on Wednesday night, calls for an overhaul of the lucrative market to incorporate more nutritional value, without driving up the risk of obesity. Many parents have put their own children on this trendy diet, following the example of celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow (pictured). But experts warn that might not be a good idea The researchers assessed 654 gluten-free products, which were compared with 655 gluten-containing products. They found the gluten-free products were marketed as substitutes, but did not offer a similar nutritional value. Many of the gluten-containing products - especially breads, pastas, pizzas and flours - also contained up to three times more protein than their so-called 'healthy' gluten-free substitutes. Gluten-free breads had a significantly higher content of lipids and saturated fatty acids than the original versions. Meanwhile gluten-free pasta had a significantly lower content of sugar and protein. And in terms of snacks, gluten-free biscuits had a significantly lower content of protein and significantly higher content of lipids. ESPGHAN expert and lead researcher, Dr Joaquim Calvo Lerma, explains: 'As more and more people are follow Continue reading >>

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