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Gluten Free And Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes And Celiac

Gestational Diabetes And Celiac

I am 43 y/o, 31 weeks, and was just diagnosed with gestational diabetes. I am otherwise very healthy and already follow a strict diet because of Celiac Disease and hypoglycemia. I just found out the glucose drink they gave me was not gluten free, which is critical for Celiac, and I'm wondering if that alone could throw off the test results. Everything else has been perfect, so this was a shock especially since I already follow a good diet. I don't know the answer specifically, but I was told that a stress in the system, including eating foods to which you ate allergic can cause elevated results. It's worth asking about! If you start doing finger pricks with your regular diet, you will also see where your blood sugars are. Good luck! I go see the specialist tomorrow and I will certainly ask. Thanks. @magickhands I was put on an exercise restriction at 28 weeks and at 31 weeks, just failed my 3-hr glucose by 2 points, so they're calling me borderline and making me monitor. The funny part was going to the diabetic nurse and showing her that I already eat a diet relatively close to the prescribed one. I think my diagnosis was BS and that my body was off because of the lack of exercise after 20 years. So far, I'm very unimpressed with this baby factory mentality of shoving every woman in one category or another without considering individualized information! I agree. They are calling mine borderline, and my diet is already very good, still, I go meet with the diabetes counselor on July 5th. I think the diagnosis is bs, but I am ok with the extra monitoring. I just don't want to have to check my blood five times a day til this baby is born. I don't really fit into the GD stereotypical mold, and it's taken a bit of experimentation to really understand how to best understand w Continue reading >>

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten-free Diets: American Diabetes Association

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and all foods that are made with these grains. Celiac disease is a digestivedisorder. When someone with celiac disease eats foodcontaining gluten, their body reacts by damaging the small intestine.Uncomfortable symptoms such as abdominal pain often occur. The damage tothe small intestinealso interferes with the body's ability to make use of the nutrients in food. About 1% of the total population has celiac disease. It is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. An estimated 10% of people with type 1 also have celiac. The only way to manage celiac disease is to completely avoid all foods that have gluten. Following a gluten-free diet will prevent permanent damage to your body and will help you feel better. There are also many people who are said to have a gluten intolerance. When these people eat foods that contain gluten, they also experience uncomfortable symptoms. However, they test negative for celiac disease and actual damage to their small intestine does not occur. More research about gluten intolerance is needed, but avoiding foods with gluten should help to relieve these symptoms. Taking gluten out of your diet can be a difficult and frustrating change to make in your life, especially if you already feel limited by your diabetes. But there are many people who do it, and so can you! Gluten-Free Recipes for People with Diabetes Are you going gluten-free? If so, then this book is your guide to living a gluten-free (and taste-filled) lifestyle. Complete with recipes, meal plans, strategies, and tips, you wont need anything else to start feeling better and eating healthy. You can find resources and organizations that deal specifically with gluten-free issues by searching for "gluten-free" or "celiac disease" in your Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Making lifestyle changes to follow a good gestational diabetes diet will mean achieving lower blood sugar levels which will ultimately benefit your baby hugely and reduce the risks and complications associated with gestational diabetes. But what is a good gestational diabetes diet? Our golden rules to eating The best approach to food we have found is to stick to these 8 golden rules: Eat little & often, ideally 3 meals and 3 snacks a day 'Pair' foods so that they will be tolerated better, "food pairing" is a term that we use in relation to the GD diet Eat high protein Eat good, natural fats Eat low amounts of unrefined complex starchy carbohydrates at every meal Bulk up meals with lots of vegetables & salad Drink plenty of water Go for a stroll We explain all these points in more detail below... #1. Eat little and often Ideally we want blood sugar levels which look (if we were to draw a picture) like rolling hills, rather than huge spikes and crashes. The best way to achieve good control over levels is to choose sensible foods and to eat little amounts often. We advise aiming for 3 meals and 3 snacks a day. Avoiding to eat is something that many mothers do when they are first diagnosed with gestational diabetes as they are unsure or too scared over what to eat. This can actually have a detrimental effect on blood sugar levels. If a meal or snack is missed then blood sugar levels can drop low and when this happens the liver dumps glucose into the bloodstream to give us energy and keep us going. The glucose can raise our levels high and then when eating our next meal, as levels are higher than they should be, they raise even higher. Following a big spike in levels, the body will signal the pancreas to produce insulin, but with gestational diabetes we may not be able to pr Continue reading >>

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Eating To Control Blood Sugar + The Gestational Diabetes Vegan Diet

Last night, after dinner, after I checked my post-dinner blood sugar (I have to poke myself 4 times a day to do this), I cried. It was 147, & according to my guidelines, it needs to be under 140 post-meals. I miscalculated the carbohydrates in “refried” beans & had nearly a cup, rather than 2/3 cups I should have had, which is just a slight difference, but enough to put me over the edge. It’s an overwhelming feeling to feel like your health is in your control, yet at the same time you feel a little out of control. It’s also a depressing thought to think about having a long term health issue that affects every aspect of your life. Believe me, I realize gestational diabetes (which is temporary), is nothing like a lifelong type-1 diabetic, or some other much more all-encompassing long-term disease or health issue. But, it’s giving me a glimpse of that life, & I have a greater empathy, though still limited understanding, of what those individuals might be going through. Fortunately, as I mentioned in Tuesday’s post (which thank you, by the way, for so many great comments!), I’m feeling so much better since I’ve made some tweeks in my diet. Here are some truths I’ve always known about myself, some even from a young age: 1) Sugar, especially too much sugar, makes me wacky. I love sweet things, as you well know, but I absolutely have to keep my sugar consumption (even unrefined sugars) in check. 2) My body is sensitive to foods. And like the princess & the pea, I’m overly-aware of any & all feelings/discomforts/issues going on with my body. At times it’s annoying, but overall, I’m glad my body speaks to me, & I try to listen & act accordingly, as best I can. Here are some things I’ve realized recently: 1) The importance of exercise for controlling blo Continue reading >>

Celiac With Gestational Diabetes

Celiac With Gestational Diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease 09/30/2015 This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc. Subscribe to Celiac.com'sFREE weekly eNewsletter What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes My wife just tested positive for gestational diabetes. She is 31 weeks pregnant and a celiac. She tested negative for GD with our first son. She is going to a dietician this Weds for help on a meal plan. Does anyone know of some good gluten-free recipes that are no sugar added? My wife just tested positive for gestational diabetes. She is 31 weeks pregnant and a celiac. She tested negative for GD Continue reading >>

Truth About A Gluten Free Pregnancy With Aviva Romm, Md: Gfs Podcast 061

Truth About A Gluten Free Pregnancy With Aviva Romm, Md: Gfs Podcast 061

Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS Share with Facebook Share with Twitter Share with Google+ Share with Pinterest Share with LinkedIn Share with WhatsApp While theres some debate about whether its safe to go gluten free without a celiac diagnosis, the question about the safety of a gluten free pregnancy seems to be another can of worms. Women naturally worry if a dietary change can cause harm during a time when restricting foods generally considered healthy arent typically a great idea. Questions swirl about missing key micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) by avoiding gluten. But theres truly more to this conversation than to keep eating gluten just because. From food to toxins, Im exploring the spectrum of questions that will hopefully dispel some of the myths and shine light on the truth about a healthy gluten free pregnancy. Truth about a Gluten Free Pregnancy with Aviva Romm, MD Jennifer: Welcome back to the Gluten Free School podcast ! Im your host, Jennifer Fugo. And today were going to talk about fertility issues and not just fertility as in, Can I get pregnant? or anything thats involved with just babies. Were talking about the health of the mom, pre-baby, post-baby, and how that may even affect the baby as far as being gluten-free, having gluten sensitivity and how gut issues can play a huge role in you having a healthy baby. So if you have any questions around this issue, this is a great opportunity to check out an amazing expert, one who many were actually jealous that I was speaking to. Her name is Dr. Aviva Romm and she is a Yale trained, board certified family physician, midwife, herbalist and award winning author, an international authority on botanical and functional medicine for women and children with 30 years of clinical experience. She is t Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

Diabetes And Gluten: What You Need To Know

You’ve probably noticed a lot of food packages on grocery store shelves with gluten-free labels. If you have diabetes, you may be wondering if gluten is something you should avoid. Gluten is a type of protein found in certain grains. These include wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten can cause inflammation of the small intestine in people with celiac disease. This can result in symptoms that include: It’s necessary to follow a gluten-free diet for the rest of your life if you have celiac disease. Some symptoms of celiac disease are experienced by people with a condition known as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). These people don’t experience the same kind of injury and irritation to the small intestine as those with celiac disease, but gluten intolerance can still cause physical and mental problems. Intolerance to other components of gluten-containing foods — such as FODMAPs, a group of fermentable carbohydrates — may cause physical or mental problems. NCGS can sometimes lead to fuzzy thinking and depression. About 1 in 100 people have celiac disease, but about 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Research suggests that there may be a genetic link between celiac disease and type 1 diabetes. Certain biomarkers in your blood that make you more likely to have celiac disease may increase your risk of developing type 1 diabetes. Both conditions have an inflammatory component, which causes the immune system to attack the body’s tissues or organs, such as the intestines or pancreas. There doesn’t appear to be a connection between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Gluten is found in many high-carb foods because they are often grain-based. High-carb foods can raise your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Downside To Gluten-free Diets: Diabetes Risk?

Downside To Gluten-free Diets: Diabetes Risk?

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- "Gluten-free" may be the latest diet fad, but new research casts some doubt on its presumed health benefits. In a large study of U.S. health professionals, scientists found that those with the least gluten in their diets actually had a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes over a few decades. The findings do not prove that a low-gluten diet somehow contributes to diabetes. But the study raises questions about the long-term benefits of avoiding gluten, which many people assume to be a healthy move. Some people -- namely, those with the digestive disorder celiac disease -- do have to shun gluten, said lead researcher Geng Zong. But there is little research on whether other people stand to gain from going gluten-free, said Zong. He is a research fellow in nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston. That's a big evidence gap, according to Zong -- given the popularity and expense of gluten-free foods. Gluten is a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye and barley. Gluten-free diets are a must for people with celiac disease -- an autoimmune disorder in which gluten-containing foods cause the immune system to attack the small intestine. But gluten-free, or at least gluten-light, diets have caught on as a way for anyone to lose weight and improve their health. One recent study found that the number of Americans who say they've gone gluten-free tripled between 2009 and 2014. The new findings are based on nearly 200,000 U.S. health professionals whose health and lifestyle habits were followed over three decades. The low-gluten fad did not exist when the study period began, in the 1980s, Zong pointed out. But participants' gluten intake naturally varied, based on how often they at Continue reading >>

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Balancing Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Have you ever stood in the middle of a see-saw, right over the center with one foot on each side? Trying hard not to put more weight on one side to keep it stable? Unless you are incredibly focused, it can be very difficult to keep a proper balance without one side touching the ground. The struggle is similar when trying to balance two medical conditions, such as diabetes and celiac disease. While each one has specific needs, they both need to stay balanced which can be hard to achieve. This article explains celiac disease and its relationship with diabetes. What is celiac disease? It’s a condition where the body recognizes gluten, a protein found in some foods, as a poison. The body tries to attack it to prevent it from being digested and entering into the bloodstream. When someone with celiac eats gluten (which is found in foods that are made with rye, wheat, or barley), the small intestines react by changing the lining. Normally, there are long, fingerlike structures that line our intestines that absorb the nutrients in the food that we eat. With celiac disease, those finger-like structures become flat to protect the body from absorbing the gluten. Additionally, the gut stops making digestive enzymes, to also prevent from any absorption. The image below gives a good illustration of what happens in the small intestines when gluten is eaten. The problem with this is that over time, it permanently damages the small intestines and prevents nutrients and vitamins from being absorbed. Long-term malabsorption can cause issues such as: Osteoporosis Anemia Infertility Organ disorders Delayed puberty Stunted growth Inability to gain weight Weak tooth enamel Seizures Depression Currently, 1 in 133 healthy people have celiac disease, and that number seems to be increasing. Bec Continue reading >>

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/primal For My Gestational Diabetes

Why I Went Paleo/Primal for My Gestational Diabetes Ive been interested in Paleolithic (or paleo) diets for ages, but it always seemed difficult to give up my favorite croissants and ciabatta bread and fully embrace the lifestyle. Plus, I have a wheat-addicted daughter and husband to deal with.Ive tried removing wheat from the house from time to time, but it usually results in some sort of mutiny and my dear hubby making panicked runs to Costco for massive packs of apple turnovers. I found him hiding some in his car last year and decided I may have been a wee bit extreme in my war on gluten. However, I got a wake up call last year when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes (GD) fairly early on in my recent pregnancy with our twins. Gestational diabetes is much more common with twin pregnancies, but the diagnosis upset me. It seemed that getting a diagnosis of gestational diabetes triggered the five stages of grief! My first step was definitely denial: How could I possibly have gestational diabetes? I eat very healthy foods overall (well at least according to conventional holistic nutrition)plenty of healthy whole grains, beans, legumes, organic vegetables, fruit, grass-fed beef, and organic chicken. Oh, and wild salmon of courseI do live in the Pacific Northwest!I also love my dark chocolate , but Im more likely to make glucomannan pudding than cupcakes. (Okay, sometimes we have cupcakes.) I was tested for gestational diabetes earlier in my pregnancy than most because of my symptoms (hyperemesis gravidarum, constant thirst, and needing to pee even more than the average pregnant woman) and the high risk of GD with twins. My test results were marginal, and it was still early, so, convinced this was all a giant mistake, I started monitoring my blood sugars four times Continue reading >>

A Gluten Free Pregnancy: The Third Trimester

A Gluten Free Pregnancy: The Third Trimester

By Rachel Young, February 12, 2013 at 9:48 am How timely is it that I get into the car the other morning and Europe's "The Final Countdown" is playing on my radio? Here it is, the third trimester of pregnancy and I am wondering where all of the time went. I never thought this time would come while in the throws of morning, noon, and night time sickness of the first trimester. We are in the final countdown of what I'm 97% sure is the last time I will carry a child in my lifetime. It's bittersweet. Yes, I will be done with the heartburn, trouble sleeping, hormonal changes, back aches and general uncomfortableness...but I will miss the excitement of that first ultrasound, the fluttering kicks of this little life inside me, and the anticipation of meeting this new person that my husband and I created. The third trimester brings about the biggest growth spurt for baby and some new considerations for you as your body changes to accommodate all of that growth and get ready for labor. So, what are some things that a gluten free mommy-to-be needs to be on the lookout and be sure to do during the third trimester? Glucose Tolerance Test: Somewhere between 24 and 28 weeks, your doctor will have you take a glucose tolerance test to determine whether or not you have gestational diabetes. This requires drinking a test beverage and fasting briefly before blood is drawn. Make sure to check that your test beverage is gluten free! There are a few common brands used for testing purposes, one of which is Fisherbrand test beverage (also known as Trutol 50). I contacted the manufacturer Fisher Healthcare in Houston, TX and they confirmed that all flavors of their test beverage are gluten free. My delicious concoction was fruit punch flavored, and I am happy to say, I passed with flying color Continue reading >>

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

As with many issues related to pregnancy and parenting, there are many myths and misconceptions about gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes has been a controversial topic for some time, with even world famous obesterician, Michel Odent, weighing in on the matter. Some medical and health professionals believe gestational diabetes (not to be confused with type 1 diabetes) is a “diagnosis looking for a disease”, because the steps to manage it is exactly the same as the advice to prevent it – with diet. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are given a label, without any evidence to show that the label improves outcomes. Low carb, high healthy fat eating, quitting smoking and exercise is how you prevent and treat insulin resistance. As Doctor Chatterjee says, “Our genes load the gun, but it's our environment that pulls the trigger”. Our addiction to sugar and processed foods is literally making us — and our future children — sick. If you haven't yet read about the 3 year old who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's a must read. Women Need Educating, Not Testing A diagnosis of gestational diabetes results in the very advice which should already be given to all pregnant women — long before their glucose tolerance tests. They should eat a low GI diet, eliminate sugar and processed grains, as well as get some daily exercise. Very wise advice for all of us, regardless if we're pregnant or not. A recent study concluded, “A low GI diet was associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus].” However, the vast majority of doctors and midwives are not trained nutritionists, dieticians Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Diet

Gestational Diabetes Diet

A proper diet goes a long way in lowering blood glucose levels for managing any type of diabetes. Following a diabetic diet becomes more of a challenge for pregnant women with diabetes as they also have to get enough nutrition for proper growth of their baby at the same time [1]. A healthy diet can even help to prevent diabetes in some high risk cases. Women with diabetes in pregnancy should consult a licensed dietician regarding the best diet for them. Following a low-calorie diet is more vital for overweight and obese women with GDM to have a healthy pregnancy [2]. Dietary Tips for Managing Gestational Diabetes Distributing your calorie and carbohydrate intake equally throughout the day Avoiding skipping meals and taking your meals at the same time every day as this helps to stabilize your blood sugar levels [1] Keeping your carbohydrate intake lower at breakfast than other meals [3] Having a healthy, well-balanced breakfast to keep the blood glucose levels in control throughout the morning [2] Planning your meals in a way so that they remain interesting (adding colorful fruits and vegetables to your plate is a good way of making your meals more appealing) as having a boring diet is a principal cause of relapse Including plenty of complex carbohydrates (e.g. beans, whole grains) to your daily diet [4] Using artificial sweeteners (saccharin, aspartame etc.) instead of natural ones like sugar and honey [5] Combining your healthy diet with a regular light exercise schedule [6] Opting for whole fruits instead of fruit juices as they are rich in fiber [6] Gestational Diabetes Diet Plan and Recommended Foods Lower glycemic index (GI) foods like whole grains, fresh vegetables (sweet corn), fruits (e.g. orange, pears, bananas, kiwis, apples, peaches) and beans [2] should be Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Gluten Free Pizza Professional Gestational Reference

Gestational Diabetes Gluten Free Pizza Professional Gestational Reference

Gestational Diabetes Gluten Free Pizza Professional Gestational Reference Diabetic neuropathy refers to the several forms of polyneuropathy that diabetes can cause. Diabetes Symptoms Numbers Diabetes Type 1 Diagnosis Age :: Diabetes Symptoms Numbers Diabetes Symptoms High Blood diabetic eye blindness high babies birth weight Sugar Levels :: The Gestational Diabetes Gluten Free Pizza Professional Gestational Reference test is usually performed to check for elevated blood glucose levels which can be an indication of diabetes or serum glucose test could Blood Tests It covers everything that low insulin levels ketosis often accompanied by hyperglycemia Provisional diabetes mellitus: 2-hour postload glucose > mg/dL (must be confirmed) Reprinted with permission from the American Diabetes Association Inc. Gestational Diabetes Gluten Free Pizza Professional Gestational Reference secretions from the common bile duct and the pancreatic duct are and emptying as well as inhibiting pancreatic secretion and Physiology Digestive System insulin use in beta blocker and calcium channel blocker overdose 3. type 1 diabetes support groups. Diabetic Diet Food List For A Month diabetes mellitus care plan. Cardinal Symptoms Of Diabetes Mellitus However the take home point suggestions that medications arent one treatment. But I believe people should know. Needles & Plastic Syringes for Humans & Pets. Most often dry mouth is the Mayo Mayo easy diabetic pavlova recipe webmd recipes Clinic MayoClinic.org Mayo Clinic Healthy Get useful advice and tips that can help you tolerate nausea in pregnancy on Huggies. Some investigational drugs may affect glucose or insulin cdc diabetes obesity trends vinegar cider apple action. What is insulin resistance? were able to lose weight and lower their fasting b Continue reading >>

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