diabetestalk.net

Gluten And Diabetes Type 1

What Are The Best Things To Do To Keep Your Brain Sharp?

What Are The Best Things To Do To Keep Your Brain Sharp?

In a nutshell: keep it busy, clean it up, feed it healthy, and encourage it to stay curious! Your brain is probably the most expensive piece of equipment you own. That’s why you should take good care of it. The good news is: there are small things you can do every day to keep it tuned to do its best work. Here are a few of those things. Tip #1. Keep it busy. Maybe you’re thinking, well I already feel like my mind is too busy with random thoughts, all the responsibilities I have, all the tasks I need to complete during the day, and that’s not even covering staying on top of news, my Instagram updates, my Facebook friends’ updates, and the emails I should be responding to right now. Don’t think tactical only; think strategic. What kind of information can you expose your brain to so that it can benefit in the long run, expand, and grow? For example, you can grow your mental superpowers with these activities: Read books. Whether it’s fiction or non-fiction that fascinates you, books are an excellent way to give yourself time to think, process new information, and learn. It’s also time that’s necessary for you to step away from the “busy-ness” of everyday life and contemplate ideas that are interesting to you. Make the time to go to a bookstore this week and browse titles that catch your eye. Get library membership and take advantage of reading books for free. Download the Goodreads app to get started with recommendations from serious book lovers and to keep track of what you read. Use your creative superpowers: write, draw, paint, or play drums. When you give yourself time for creativity, your brain will thank you. Why? Because you’re giving it ample space to express thoughts, feelings, and new ideas that are constantly being created and that need to h Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Diabetes

The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 6%. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, screening for celiac disease is recommended after a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, as well as counseling for the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes after a celiac disease diagnosis. Type 1 Diabetes In cases of type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the specialized cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. When the body can no longer produce sufficient insulin (a protein that regulates blood glucose concentration) the resulting chronically high glucose levels in the blood (hyperglycemia) cause blood vessel and nerve damage. This can lead to serious complications, such as: stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, and amputation. Symptoms for diabetes include: frequent urination, thirst, hunger, weight loss, dry mouth, and fatigue. The exact cause that starts the autoimmune reaction in type 1 diabetes is still not understood. There are genetic and environmental factors that can increase the risk of developing diabetes, as well as certain drugs that lead to the specific destruction of the beta cells. The condition is usually diagnosed in children or young adults, which is why it was once called juvenile diabetes. Diabetes is much easier to test for than celiac disease. A blood test, usually done after a period of fasting, measures how much glucose is in the blood. If it is over a certain threshold, the person has diabetes or pre-diabetes. If caught early enough, the autoantibodies (antibodies that attack the body) can be tested for before the patient actually has diabetes or pre-diabetes. Treating diabetes typic Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

There is a sure connection between Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes. Individuals with CD are more likely to have other autoimmune disorders than the general population. For example, 5-10% of those with CD also have Type 1 diabetes. Even if you do not have diabetes, this is important information. Chances are you know a diabetic. If you do, share this information with them, especially if they have symptoms of celiac disease or unresolved health issues. You may help someone progress along the path to optimal health by doing so. Before we dive in to look at the CD-Type 1 Diabetes connection, let’s first understand exactly what diabetes is. We’ll focus on Type 1 diabetes, the type associated with CD. Next, we’ll expose a few not-so-sweet myths about diabetes and check out the facts science has for us. Finally, we’ll talk about a few challenges faced by diabetics when they first go gluten free. What is Diabetes? Diabetes affects nearly 26 million individuals in the US. Formally known asDiabetes mellitus, diabetes refers to a group of diseases resulting in high blood sugar. {blood sugar ~ glucose, the body’s primary source of energy, in the blood} Even though we like to keep it simple, we need a little more information than just “high blood sugar” to have a solid understanding of diabetes. Let’s look at how the body’s systems work together to regulate our blood sugar. Then, we’ll see what happens when things don’t work exactly as they should. When we eat, food is broken down into glucose, the main source of energy for our cells. Some glucose travels from the intestines directly into the blood. This causes the pancreas to produce insulin. Insulin signals cells in the body to allow glucose in for immediate use as energy, or to be stored for later. {pancre Continue reading >>

Clinical Benefit Of A Gluten-free Diet In Type 1 Diabetic Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease

Clinical Benefit Of A Gluten-free Diet In Type 1 Diabetic Children With Screening-detected Celiac Disease

OBJECTIVE—This study was performed to 1) determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type 1 diabetes and 2) estimate the clinical effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) in patients with diabetes and celiac disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—In a region comprising 24% of the Danish population, all patients <16 years old with type 1 diabetes were identified and 269 (89%) were included in the study. The diagnosis of celiac disease was suspected in patients with endomysium and tissue transglutaminase antibodies in serum and confirmed by intestinal biopsy. Patients with celiac disease were followed for 2 years while consuming a GFD. RESULTS—In 28 of 33 patients with celiac antibodies, an intestinal biopsy showed villous atrophy. In 5 patients, celiac disease had been diagnosed previously, giving an overall prevalence of 12.3% (95% CI 8.6–16.9). Patients with celiac disease had a lower SD score (SDS) for height (P < 0.001) and weight (P = 0.002) than patients without celiac disease and were significantly younger at diabetes onset (P = 0.041). A GFD was obtained in 31 of 33 patients. After 2 years of follow-up, there was an increase in weight SDS (P = 0.006) and in children <14 years old an increase in height SDS (P = 0.036). An increase in hemoglobin (P = 0.002) and serum ferritin (P = 0.020) was found, whereas HbA1c remained unchanged (P = 0.311) during follow-up. CONCLUSIONS—This population-based study showed the highest reported prevalence of celiac disease in type 1 diabetes in Europe. Patients with celiac disease showed clinical improvements with a GFD. We recommend screening for celiac disease in all children with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— In Denmark, the treatment of all children with type 1 diabetes is restricted t Continue reading >>

Effects Of Gluten Free Diet On Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

Effects Of Gluten Free Diet On Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus In Children

The central hypothesis of this proposal is that a gluten-free diet introduced shortly after diagnosis can reverse or arrest islet destruction in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The specific aims are to determine the effects of a gluten-free diet on 1) endogenous insulin production and 2) the corresponding gut flora of children with new-onset type 1 diabetes. This is a randomized placebo controlled clinical trial testing the effect of altering the gut microbiome via a gluten-free diet on endogenous insulin production as a measure of the pace and severity of islet destruction at the time of diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The project entails eliminating gluten from the diet of the intervention group and comparing bacterial gut flora and endogenous insulin response with those in a control group up to one year following the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The proposal introduces a new potential etiology for type 1 diabetes in humans: the Bacterial Hypothesis. The short term goal is to identify specific islet-preserving microbiome changes induced by eliminating gluten from the diet of patients recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The long term goal is to develop these changes into effective and safe strategies that can allow patients with type 1 diabetes to achieve permanent insulin-independence. Show Detailed Description Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Estimated Enrollment : 60 participants Allocation: Randomized Intervention Model: Parallel Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Treatment Official Title: Effect of a Gluten Free Diet on Ameliorating New Onset Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescents Study Start Date : March 2015 Estimated Primary Completion Date : March 2020 Estimated Study Completion D Continue reading >>

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

Paleo And Type 1 Diabetes

When most people think of “diabetes,” they think of Type 2 Diabetes – that’s the kind that you (usually) get as an adult after a lifetime of eating junk food and sitting on the couch. Type 2 is the “diabetes” that goes along with the rest of the metabolic syndrome (obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol). Type 1 Diabetes is a completely different problem. It’s related to diet (more on this below), but it’s not a “lifestyle disease” and it’s not caused by a poor diet the way Type 2 is. In Type 1, an autoimmune attack on the pancreas prevents them from producing the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary for metabolizing carbs and protein (more on insulin here), so people with Type 1 Diabetes have to inject insulin every time they eat a meal. Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes NOT part of the metabolic syndrome; patients with Type 1 Diabetes are often thin. Part of the metabolic syndrome; closely connected to obesity (although not all people with Type 2 are obese). Not enough (if any) insulin is produced, so your body can’t metabolize carbohydrates or protein on its own. Insulin is being produced (too much of it, actually), but your body is “deaf” to the insulin signal so it doesn’t work properly. Common in children Rare in children; usually develops in adults after a lifetime of bad eating. Not caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Can be caused by eating junk food and not exercising. Autoimmune disease May have an autoimmune component, but is not primarily an autoimmune disease. It’s easy to see how a Paleo approach to diet and lifestyle could be safe and effective for Type 2 Diabetes – if a disease is caused by eating too much junk food and not exercising, then eating real food and taking up a gym habit can only be hel Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1 Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how your body uses blood sugar, called glucose. Glucose is the main source of energy for the brain and for the cells that make up muscle and tissue of the body. Type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes, is an autoimmune condition that is usually diagnosed in children, teenagers and young adults. In this form of diabetes, the body does not make insulin, which is the hormone needed to get glucose from the bloodstream into cells. Only about 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease and although there is no cure, proper treatment can make this condition manageable. Common symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, feeling very thirsty, hungry and tired, blurred vision, cuts and bruises that are slow to heal, weight loss, and tingling, pain or numbness in the hands and feet. What is the Connection between Type 1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease? Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are both immune-mediated conditions and share a similar genetic profile, resulting in a significant amount of overlap in patients Around 3-8 % of people with type 1 diabetes will have biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, so people with this condition would benefit from regular celiac disease screening Celiac disease associated with type 1 diabetes is usually asymptomatic (showing no symptoms) and may only be found upon screening Celiac disease and type 1 diabetes have many of the same signs and symptoms, such as abdominal pain, gas, bloating, malabsorption, weight loss, and abnormal liver function tests. This can cause celiac disease to be overlooked. Untreated celiac disease may contribute to irregular blood glucose levels Unexplained hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can be a sign of malabsorption related to Continue reading >>

What Are Some (gentle) Strategies To Administer Insulin Shots To An Obstinate Dog?

What Are Some (gentle) Strategies To Administer Insulin Shots To An Obstinate Dog?

I understand that for a second episode of overactive thyroid the usual treatment is radioactive iodine, designed to reduce the activity in the thyroid but more often than not killing it off entirely leaving the patient needing to take thyroxine daily for life. I am obviously not keen on spending the rest of my days (I am only in my 40s) feeling dreadful and getting fat! Although I do not have diabetes I suffered with abdominal pain almost 50 years of my life, much as described. Having every test and scan imaginable it was not until I eradicated gluten and dairy from my diet, did the pain go entirely. I took an allergy test as a last resort. I imagine it will be difficult to sort his diet if this is the case for a 12 year old boy, being a Type 1 diabetes sufferer. If I stray from the diet, the pain returns. Worth a shot in any case and was life changing for me. I am now 58. I, too, when much younger was told it was “all in my head” and you cannot have stomach ache every day! However, since being issued with an insulin pump 5 years ago his level of control and even temperedness has improved significantly. He is thriving and studying at Cambridge. A major problem for which I would seek more advice is that of snoring and ‘chronic sleep apnoea’ which leaves him so tired and sleep pattern disturbed. He uses a CPAP pump but I have heard there are mouth guards that can be used effectively. Any experience? Or feedback? Since being unable to take PPIs (or Ranitadine or similar) and despite maintaining a strict low fat/anti-reflux diet, I am nevertheless all too familiar with these symptoms. Perhaps raising his bed at the head end and having nothing to eat for three hours before lying down would be a start. Perhaps. Hopefully! Hi there, I am baffled as to why you exclude p Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Celiac Disease

Diabetes And Celiac Disease

What is celiac disease? An autoimmune disease which is the result of an immune system response to the ingestion of gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley) in susceptible individuals. This response to gluten damages the small intestine, leading to malabsorption of nutrients, and related health issues. Can cause food and medications to be absorbed poorly. This can lead to symptoms of starvation, nutrient and medication malabsorption. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet. If the diet is followed, the intestinal damage will slowly heal. This can take several months or longer. The disease is lifelong. Intestinal damage occurs each time gluten is consumed. Celiac disease affects about one in every 133 people in the United States. Diabetes and celiac disease: The link There is a genetic link between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease. (There is no connection between Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease.) Developing one of the diseases increases the risk of developing the other. The prevalence of celiac disease in people with Type 1 diabetes is about 6% worldwide. When a family has two children who have Type 1 diabetes, there is a much higher chance that someone in the family will have celiac disease. Symptoms of celiac disease vary widely, but are often absent in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. Celiac disease can cause unstable blood sugar control. CELIAC DISEASE Classic symptoms… Gas, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, vomiting, weight loss, anemia. Other symptoms… Chronic fatigue, bone pain, muscle cramps, balance problems, migraine headaches, seizures, behavior and memory problems, neuropathies, growth and maturation delays, infertility, bone disease, dental enamel defects, and more. Gluten-free grains and starches The following grains and starches Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Gluten Induced Disorders

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus And Gluten Induced Disorders

Go to: Introduction Coeliac Disease (CD), also referred to as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune condition that occurs in genetically predisposed people by exposure to gluten. Initially mentioned in literature in the second century AD, CD was described as an intestinal disorder with symptoms of diarrhoea, malabsorption and weight loss. Recently, it has become clear that there is a group of conditions related to gluten consumption. Foremost among them are three types: a) the least common is wheat allergy; b) the autoimmune form, the best characterized, includes CD, dermatitis herpetiformis, and gluten ataxia; and c) sensitivity to gluten, which is possibly immune-mediated and now the most common (1). An association between gluten and CD was only established much later, by Dicke (1953), who found that the removal of gluten from patients’ diets led to the improvement of symptoms (2). Gluten and gluten toxicity Gluten is a protein constituent found in wheat, rye, and barley. It is gluten that gives dough its elasticity, helps it rise and contributes to the texture of many food products such as bread, pasta, or imitation meats (3,4). Specifically the storage proteins (prolamins) gliadin (wheat), secalin (rye), and hordein (barley) have been shown to have toxic effects on intestinal cells in gluten sensitive people. The toxic effects of these prolamins include the reduction of F-actin, inhibition of cellular growth, premature cell death, the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, and increased small bowel permeability (5). Symptoms and associations of CD Despite a strong association with classic symptoms such as abdominal pain, chronic diarrhoea, and vomiting; symptoms such as faltering growth in childhood, anaemia, extreme fatigue, and tiredness are also very commo Continue reading >>

Can A Gluten-free Diet Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

Can A Gluten-free Diet Cure Type 1 Diabetes?

A new study revealed that a child with type 1 diabetes went into complete remission and remained that way for 20 months (perhaps more, but that was the duration of the study) on a gluten-free diet. No insulin was required and his blood values were normal. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. By that is meant that one’s immune system mistakenly attacks a body part instead of a disease causing organism such as a bacteria, virus or parasite. The immune system is designed to protect the body from foreign invaders, it is certainly not designed to attack the body itself. Yet, in the case of over 100 different autoimmune diseases, that’s exactly what happens. In diabetes the pancreas is the target, in celiac disease the small intestine bears the brunt of destructive immune forces, in rheumatoid arthritis it is the joints that are under attack, etc, etc. Research has known for some time that there is a strong correlation between type 1 diabetes (typically diagnosed in children) and celiac disease. In fact the genetic components of both diseases seem to share genes. The correlation is so strong that some researchers feel that it is prudent to rule out celiac disease in type 1 diabetics. Unfortunately I have found that all too often it is the diabetes and its treatment with insulin that gets center stage and celiac or gluten intolerance is either not tested or, even when found, is not given the attention it deserves. I still remember two cases where the parent of the child stated that a gluten free diet was just ‘too much’ to cope with considering all that diabetes involved, diet-wise. While I appreciate that it’s not an easy lifestyle, I think if these parents had the study that we’re about to discuss to hand they might have been more willing to adopt a gluten-f Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes

Many individuals diagnosed with type 1 diabetes only discover they have celiac disease through routine screening because of the known relationship between the two conditions. Most report having no symptoms of celiac disease, and that the diagnosis is sometimes seen as an after-thought to the diabetes. Whether or not individuals have symptoms, if a celiac disease diagnosis is confirmed, it is absolutely essential to follow a strict gluten-free diet to avoid the same health risks listed here for untreated celiac disease. Perhaps most important is that the earlier a gluten-free diet is initiated, the lower the chances are of a person developing additional autoimmune disorders. It can be very difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of a gluten-free diet in a person without obvious symptoms, and equally as difficult for that person to find the motivation to strictly follow it. Follow-up care with your physician is essential in these cases for monitoring blood antibody levels for celiac disease; a follow-up endoscopy may be indicated to confirm that intestinal healing has occurred. Weight gain or loss, fatigue, neuropathy, and gastrointestinal problems can all be related to either celiac disease or diabetes, so it can be difficult to differentiate between the causes without probing further with your healthcare providers. Consider the following information when managing a dual-diagnosis of celiac disease and diabetes; with practice you won’t just be managing, you will be thriving! General Guidelines and Advice Work with a knowledgeable and credentialed dietitian (registered dietitian and/or certified diabetes educator). You may get the most personalized advice and successful life changes from working one-on-one with someone you trust. Many gluten-free flour substitutes are m Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is a digestive disorder that appears to be more common in people with type 1 diabetes than in the general population. Celiac disease is found in 4 to 9% of children with type 1 diabetes but, in 60 to 70% of these children, the disease is asymptomatic (‘silent’ celiac disease). Children with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk for celiac disease during the first 10 years of diabetes. What is celiac disease? Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition in which the body cannot tolerate gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and triticale. It is the gluten in the flour that helps bread and other baked goods bind and prevents crumbling. This feature has made gluten widely used in the production of many processed and packaged foods. If you have celiac disease and eat food with gluten, your immune system responds by damaging the small intestine and preventing the body from properly absorbing nutrients in your food, including protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Celiac disease is an inherited condition. First degree relatives (parents, brothers, sisters and children) of people with celiac disease are at the highest risk of having unrecognized celiac disease (5-15%). It can appear at any time in the life of a person with a hereditary predisposition to it. Environmental factors such as emotional stress, pregnancy, surgery, or an infection (e.g., travellers’ diarrhea, pneumonia) can sometimes trigger the onset of symptoms. For more information, please visit the Canadian Celiac Association. What are the symptoms of celiac disease? Many people with celiac disease don’t have any symptoms at all, which is why the disease is often undiagnosed. In people who do experience symptoms, they can vary from obvious digestive problems such as seve Continue reading >>

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

Celiac Disease And Type 1 Diabetes: Is There A Connection?

So the other day I fielded a question about celiac disease and if there is a direct correlation between having celiac and type 1 diabetes. A great question as more type 1 diabetics seem to be diagnosed with celiac disease after their type 1 diagnosis. So what’s the deal with celiac disease? What is it exactly and what can be done to help alleviate the symptoms? Let’s take a closer look! What Is Celiac Disease Celiac disease is a digestive illness that occurs due to the ingestion of gluten. If you have celiac disease, your intestines cannot tolerate the presence of gliadin, which is a component of gluten. Gluten is present in wheat, barley, and rye. When a person with celiac disease eats foods with gluten, such as bread or cereal, their immune system inappropriately reacts to the ingested gluten and causes inflammation and injury to the small intestine. This results in symptoms such as diarrhea, bloating, and weight loss, as well as an inability to absorb important food nutrients. Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes So what’s the deal when it comes to type 1 diabetes and a celiac disease diagnosis? While there doesn’t appear to be a direct link between type 2 diabetes and celiac that’s not necessarily the case when it comes to type 1. Per the celiac disease foundation: “The link between type 1 diabetes mellitus and celiac disease was first established in the 1960s. The estimated prevalence of celiac disease in patients with type 1 diabetes is approximately 8%, and about 1% in the general population. Most patients with both conditions have asymptomatic celiac disease, or symptoms that may be confused for symptoms of their diabetes. For this reason, and the significantly higher prevalence rate of celiac disease in diabetes patients, many doctors recommend gettin Continue reading >>

Dietary Gluten And The Development Of Type 1 Diabetes

Dietary Gluten And The Development Of Type 1 Diabetes

Abstract Gluten proteins differ from other cereal proteins as they are partly resistant to enzymatic processing in the intestine, resulting in a continuous exposure of the proteins to the intestinal immune system. In addition to being a disease-initiating factor in coeliac disease (CD), gluten intake might affect type 1 diabetes development. Studies in animal models of type 1 diabetes have documented that the pathogenesis is influenced by diet. Thus, a gluten-free diet largely prevents diabetes in NOD mice while a cereal-based diet promotes diabetes development. In infants, amount, timing and mode of introduction have been shown to affect the diabetogenic potential of gluten, and some studies now suggest that a gluten-free diet may preserve beta cell function. Other studies have not found this effect. There is evidence that the intestinal immune system plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, as diabetogenic T cells are initially primed in the gut, islet-infiltrating T cells express gut-associated homing receptors, and mesenteric lymphocytes transfer diabetes from NOD mice to NOD/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Thus, gluten may affect diabetes development by influencing proportional changes in immune cell populations or by modifying the cytokine/chemokine pattern towards an inflammatory profile. This supports an important role for gluten intake in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes and further studies should be initiated to clarify whether a gluten-free diet could prevent disease in susceptible individuals or be used with newly diagnosed patients to stop disease progression. Notes This work was supported by a grant from Kirsten and Freddy Johansens Fond. DPF was supported by Institutional Research Concept RVO: 61388971 and grant no. 31 Continue reading >>

More in diabetes