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Glucose Tolerance Test Side Effects

[study Of Causes Of Untoward Reactions Of The Glucose Tolerance Test].

[study Of Causes Of Untoward Reactions Of The Glucose Tolerance Test].

Abstract The observation of the Side-effects and influent factores after 75g OGTT indioated that the aotal rate of side-effects was 52.43%. After OGTT the commonest side-effect was vomiting. Others were dizzy and palpitation. The side-effects were also related to age, sex, starvation, speed of taking glucose water, water volum of dissolving glucose, gastrointestinal diseases, blood glucose level, etc. It was recommended in this paper that the speed of taking glucose water should be 3-5 minutes, the water temperature below 40 degrees C and starvation about 14 hours. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

I’m a midwife and MD who specializes in the health and wellness of pregnant mommas. While I’m one of the original crunchy mamas, I got the science thing down tight in my medical training at Yale, so I can keep you informed on what’s safe, what’s not, and what are the best alternatives. This article, in which I take on the toxic ingredients in oral glucose test drinks, is the first in a 3-part series on gestational diabetes. If you’re pregnant, planning to be pregnant, or working with pregnant mommas – this series is for you! Is Gestational Diabetes Really an Issue? In the past decade obesity has become rampant in our country. With it the rates of diabetes in the general population, and gestational diabetes (GDM) – which is an excessive increase in glucose intolerance in pregnancy (some increase in glucose intolerance is actually normal and allows more sugar to get to the baby for growth) – have risen dramatically. Current estimates are that 5%-7% of pregnant women in the U.S. develop GDM. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a host of serious medical problems for mom and baby. However, at levels even lower than those that would qualify a woman for a GDM diagnosis, chronically elevated blood sugar also puts mom and baby at much higher risk of pregnancy and birth complications. Elevated blood sugar creates a condition in the body called “oxidative stress” and in pregnancy, which is already a state of somewhat increased oxidative stress, this can lead to high blood pressure, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Also, babies born to overweight or diabetic moms have a much higher lifetime likelihood of developing chronic health problems associated with obesity and diabetes. Women who develop GDM also have at least a 50% change of becoming diabetic later Continue reading >>

What Side Effects Are Associated With The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Drink?

What Side Effects Are Associated With The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test Drink?

Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. Youmay be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy)in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANA®. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA® can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). Youmay be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on a low sodium (salt) diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age orolder Yeast infection of the penis (balanitis or balanoposthitis).Men who take INVOKANA® may get a yeast infection of the skin around the penis. Symptoms include: redness, itching, or swelling of the penis; rash of the penis; foul-smelling discharge from the penis;or pain in the skin around penis Before you take INVOKANA®, tell your doctor if you have a history of amputation; heart disease or are at risk for heart disease; blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg); damage to the nerves (neuropathy) of your leg; diabetic f Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Diabetes Glucose Testing

Side Effects Of Diabetes Glucose Testing

Diabetes glucose test side effects and complications are possible. They can occur from the needle stick, from fasting and from drinking a sweet drink. In this article, you will learn what they are. There are a few different types of glucose tests that are done to check for diabetes and to monitor the effects of the treatment of diabetes on blood glucose levels. These include the random blood sugar (taken at any time), 2 hour postprandial blood sugar (taken 2 hours after eating), fasting blood sugar (taken at least 8 hours after eating), and oral glucose tolerance test (taken after drinking a sweet liquid). Below are possible diabetes glucose test side effects and their possible complications. Side Effects and Complications Needle Stick All tests involve at least one needle stick to draw the blood from to measure glucose levels. When drawing the blood, a tourniquet is wrapped around the upper arm to make collecting the blood easier. To some this may feel tight but the length of time it stays on is minimal. The needle stick may feel like a quick sting or pinch but should not be painful, as long as the person drawing the blood is not digging around searching for the vein. Some people may feel faint at the sight of blood but this can usually be prevented by not watching as they perform the test. Bruising at the puncture site may occur. Some people bruise more easily than others. Holding pressure over the site for several minutes after the blood is drawn can help reduce bruising. Continued bleeding from the puncture site, despite holding pressure over the site, can be a problem, especially if the person has a bleeding disorder or is taking blood-thinning medications such as Coumadin or aspirin. Phlebitis, or inflammation of the vein, is another possible side effect from a ne Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

A glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test checks how well the body processes blood sugar (glucose). It involves comparing the levels of glucose in the blood before and after drinking a sugary drink. The results of this test can help doctors to detect type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance). It is also used to help diagnose diabetes in pregnancy. How does a glucose tolerance test work? In most people a simple blood test is enough to detect diabetes. However, some people have 'borderline' results on routine blood tests and then a glucose tolerance test may help. Also, a glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. This is known as pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) and is a condition that can lead to diabetes. In healthy people, glucose levels in the blood always rise after a meal but they soon return to normal as the glucose is used up or stored. A glucose tolerance test helps to distinguish between this normal pattern and the patterns seen in diabetes and pre-diabetes. Prior to a glucose tolerance test you are asked not to eat for a certain length of time before the test. Then you drink a sugary drink. Normally, the body should quickly move glucose from the blood into the body's cells. This would reduce the amount of glucose found in the blood samples taken. If there is a problem moving glucose into the cells, glucose remains in the bloodstream. This shows as a higher level of glucose in the blood samples. When the results of the blood samples come back, doctors compare the level of glucose found in your blood Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

Description of the test The glucose tolerance test measures the body's ability to use glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar found in the blood. Glucose levels, also called blood sugar levels, are regulated by the hormone insulin. When insulin works properly, blood sugar levels in the blood remain controlled. If insulin does not work properly or the body does not produce enough insulin, you may have diabetes. The test is commonly used to diagnose medical conditions where the body cannot use glucose properly. Testing can be done in a doctor's office, clinic, or hospital. How often should the test be performed? The test is routinely used during pregnancy to determine whether a woman has developed gestational diabetes (a temporary form of diabetes caused by pregnancy). It can also be used on a regular basis to screen people who are at risk of diabetes. Why is this test performed? This test is commonly used to diagnose medical conditions where the body cannot use glucose properly, such as prediabetes (where blood sugar is higher than normal, but not high enough for diabetes), diabetes, and gestational diabetes. It also helps determine if you have another condition that affects blood glucose levels (e.g., Cushing's syndrome, celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, acromegaly, pheochromocytoma, hemochromatosis, Addison's disease, hypothyroidism, or cirrhosis). Are there any risks and precautions? Although the glucose tolerance test is considered safe, it does have some risk of side effects or complications. Though rare, the side effects or complications may include: infection, if the area is not properly sterilized before the sample is taken excess bleeding from the area that was punctured bruising and swelling where the needle was inserted feeling light-headed You will be monitored th Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test: Procedure, Results, & Side Effects

Glucose Tolerance Test: Procedure, Results, & Side Effects

A glucose tolerance test may be a good choice if you are worried that your body isn’t properly breaking down glucose or producing enough insulin. It is a simple test that can provide important answers if your health is being impacted. What is a Glucose Tolerance Test? A glucose tolerance test is a means to determine how well your body is able to break down sugar. It consists of taking a measurement of your blood, injecting or consuming a certain amount of glucose, and then measuring the glucose levels in your blood following that intake of sugar. Depending on the concentration of the glucose in your blood, it is possible to determine whether your body is functioning properly in terms of glucose breakdown. Why is it done? Glucose tolerance test is administered to determine whether you are suffering from Type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes. If you think that you are experiencing some of the symptoms of diabetes, your doctor will almost certainly recommend that you take one of these very common tests. In the case of Type 1 diabetes, it is easier to recognize and diagnose, but if you are developing Type 2 diabetes, the symptoms may be more difficult to properly identify. Most pregnant women should undergo this test due to the high risk of gestational diabetes, and the test will typically be administered around the 24th week of pregnancy. If the signs of gestational diabetes have appeared before then, your doctor may give you the test earlier in your term. How to Prepare for the Test? Before you undergo a glucose tolerance test, most doctors will recommend an eight-hour fast, without any food or beverages, aside from water. In the days leading up to the fast, however, it is best to eat a normal diet. Avoid urinating before the test, as a urine sample may be required, a Continue reading >>

Adverse Effects During The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test In Post-bariatric Surgery Patients.

Adverse Effects During The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test In Post-bariatric Surgery Patients.

Abstract OBJECTIVE: The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is used in the screening of gestational diabetes, in diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in conjunction with fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and risk factors of adverse effects of OGTT in patients who underwent bariatric surgery, in addition to proposing standardization for ordering the OGTT in these patients. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This study assessed the incidence of adverse effects in 128 post-bariatric surgery patients who underwent the OGTT. Descriptive and logistic regression analysis were performed, the dependent variables were defined as the presence of signs (tremor, profuse sweating, tachycardia), symptoms (nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, weakness), and hypoglycemia (blood glucose ≤ 50 mg/dL). RESULTS: One hundred and seventeen participants (91.4%) were female; 38 (29.7%) participants were pregnant. High incidence (64.8%) of adverse effects was observed: nausea (38.4%), dizziness (30.5%), weakness (25.8%), diarrhea (23.4%), hypoglycemia (14.8%), tachycardia (14.1%), tremor (13.3%), profuse sweating (12.5%) and one case of severe hypoglycemia (24 mg/dL). The presence of signs was associated with hypoglycemia (OR = 8.1, CI 95% 2.6-25.1). The arterial hypertension persisted as a risk factor for the incidence of signs (OR = 3.6, CI 95% 1.2-11.3). Fasting glucose below 75 mg/dL increased the risk of hypoglycemia during the test (OR = 9.5, CI 95% 2.6-35.1). CONCLUSION: In this study, high incidence of adverse effects during the OGTT was observed in post-bariatric surgery patients. If these results are confirmed by further studies, the indication and regulation of the OGTT procedure must be reviewed for these patients. Continue reading >>

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

. . . and don’t forget those vegetables. Healthy fats are essential, of course, and don’t skip meals! You dutifully nod your head, and then look down at the bottle of glucola that’s just been handed to you. All of a sudden you’re in a “choose your own adventure” story. Which path will you take? What are the risks and benefits of this test? Today I’m going to share my personal process in deciding whether or to take the oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). Please keep in mind that as I wrote in my posts on the vitamin K shot and Group B Strep, “Best Boo-Boo Kisser South Of Puckett’s Gas Station” is about as official as things get for me professionally. I am not a doctor, this is not medical advice, and your decision is completely up to you. If you need some convincing on this, read my full disclaimer where I say it over and over again. Okay, let’s jump in! What is gestational diabetes? Most doctors say we don’t really know why gestational diabetes happens, but there is a theory out there that makes a lot of sense to me personally, and it’s this: Before modern conveniences like grocery stores, people ate what grew in their backyard. Our ancestors’ staples were sometimes starch heavy (like the maca root consumed by Peruvians), and other times they were more fat and protein-based (like the Inuit). Our bodies do an amazing job adapting to whatever’s available, but there are certain things we all need to thrive. Glucose is a particularly essential nutrient for babies, but in some regions it can be scarce. According to this theory, our bodies adapted to the risk of scarcity by giving our babies preferential access to it during pregnancy. How does that work? As Chris Kresser has observed, “Pregnant women are naturally insulin resistant.” In other Continue reading >>

Not So Sweet – Glucose Tolerance Test And Gestational Diabetes Information

Not So Sweet – Glucose Tolerance Test And Gestational Diabetes Information

Between 24 and 28 weeks gestation, most OBs and midwives send pregnant woman for the dreaded glucose tolerance test (GTT). This one-hour test is designed to determine who is at risk for gestational diabetes. In this article, I will detail everything you need to know about the test, what gestational diabetes is, and how to read the test results when you attain them. Let’s begin: What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition that affects three to five percent of pregnant women. The placenta, the organ responsible for nourishing the growing baby, produces pregnancy hormones that can interfere with the body’s ability to make or use insulin. In some women, gestational diabetes occurs when the pancreas over produces insulin to accommodate the insulin resistance caused by the placenta. Causing the need to produce up to three times the normal amount of insulin, gestational diabetes puts the woman at risk for a large baby at birth, preeclampsia, premature delivery, and type II diabetes later in life. Her baby will be at risk for hypoglycemia after birth and type II diabetes as it gets older. With proper diet and monitoring, the risks of gestational diabetes can be minimized. What to Expect During the Glucose Tolerance Test Women taking the one-hour GTT will receive a sugary drink with 50 grams of glucose. Three popular flavors of the drink include orange, fruit punch and lemon-lime. Many women describe the taste as flat soda or a melted popsicle. Pregnant women are given five minutes to finish the drink and will not be permitted to eat or drink anything else during the test. A nurse or lab technician will draw blood exactly one hour later. Although many women feel little side effects from the drink, some moms-to-be may get headaches or extreme fatigue fro Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

Side Effects During The Standard Glucose Tolerance Test And A Improved New Solution For The Test

Side Effects During The Standard Glucose Tolerance Test And A Improved New Solution For The Test

Side effects such as nausea and vomiting occurred frequently during the standard glucose tolerance test. In our experience frequency of side effects shown in 608persons tested with 100g of glucose was 45.7percent. Adding some flavors or changing the concentration of glucose in test solutions could not affect the frequency of side effects. One new test solution (SDT-25) which consisted of hydrolyzed starch was administered in 240persons and the frequency of side effects of SDT-25was much less than that of glucose solution (p<0.01). It was proved that blood sugar levels after SDT- 25ingestion were almost equal to those after glucose ingestion. © Japan Diabetes Society Continue reading >>

What You Can Expect

What You Can Expect

The glucose tolerance test is done in several steps. When you arrive at your doctor's office or lab, a member of your health care team will take a sample of blood from a vein in your arm. This blood sample will be used to measure your fasting blood glucose level. Type 2 diabetes If you're being tested for type 2 diabetes: You'll drink about 8 ounces (237 milliliters) of a syrupy glucose solution containing 2.6 ounces (75 grams) of sugar Two hours later, your blood glucose level will be measured again Gestational diabetes The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends performing a one-hour blood glucose challenge test to screen for gestational diabetes in low-risk pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Your doctor may recommend earlier screening if you're at increased risk of developing gestational diabetes. Risk factors may include: Gestational diabetes in an earlier pregnancy Family history of diabetes Obesity Having a medical condition associated with the development of diabetes, such as metabolic syndrome or polycystic ovary syndrome If your doctor determines you're at risk or you have a suspicious value on the one-hour test, you may be advised to take a three-hour glucose tolerance test. For the three-hour test: You will be asked to come to the test fasting — not having had anything to eat or drink for the previous 8 hours. A fasting blood sugar will be obtained. You'll drink about 8 ounces (237 milliliters) of a glucose solution containing 3.5 ounces (100 grams) of sugar. Your blood glucose level will be tested again one, two and three hours after you drink the solution. After drinking the glucose solution, you'll likely need to remain in the doctor's office or lab while you're waiting for your blood glucose level to be tested. Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

Most of the food people eat is turned directly into glucose when digested, and the body uses it as energy. The pancreas is responsible for making the hormone insulin which helps to get glucose into the cells of the body. Diabetes is a long-term disease that occurs due to the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the body being unable to use the insulin it produces effectively. The body is unable to process food properly to use for energy. Glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to severe health problems. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and is also known as juvenile diabetes. With type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin. According to The American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas responds by making more insulin to cover the deficiency but is not able to keep blood glucose at normal levels. As glucose builds up in the blood, the body's cells do not receive the energy they need. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Glucose tolerance test: Testing for diabetes A simple blood test can often detect diabetes. If the test produces borderline results, a glucose tolerance test may help with the final diagnosis. In a healthy person, glucose levels will rise after eating a meal and return to normal once the glucose is used or stored by the body. A glucose tolerance test can help to work out the difference between normal glucose levels and the levels seen in diabetes and prediabetes. The glucose tolerance test is used to measure t Continue reading >>

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