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Glucose Tolerance Test Borderline Result

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline Gestational Diabeties - Confusing?? :-(

Borderline gestational diabeties - confusing?? :-( Don't forget to sign up for our monthly baby emails full of advice, tips and suggestions for the first year. The Drop-In Clinic has moved. If youre looking for advice on your babys sleep, feeding or child health, our friendly, experienced health visitors and nursery nurses can help you, here . I hope everyone is well (i'm not liking the snow today) I had to have a fasting gestational diabeties blood test on Monday. I was told not to eat/drink after 8pm on Sunday night and then went to the hospital at 8am where I had an initial blood test and had to drink a pint of lucozozade . I had to wait for 2 hours and then have another blood test. Well..... i was hoping somebody could help me with the results as I'm quite confused and a little bit worried. My 2nd blood result after the lucozade and 2 hour wait was 7.6 I've been told that i'm borderline diabetic and thats it!!! No other information what so ever!!! I'm currently 27+6 (i think - baby brain) and I'm also suffering with low iron (which I've started taking medication for today). Is there anything I can do to help myself from feeling so thirsty (despite drink 10000 gallons of water a day), and feeling so rough all of the time?? I would have though I would have been given a little bit more information that that. Also a bit about me (if it helps). I'm 26, my bmi is 21 and i'm 5'6. My son was a very large baby when he was born (I had lots of complications with his birth too) and this baby is measuring big also Any information would be greatly appreciated x I had GD too. You'll have to excuse the vagueness (baby brain never goes away!!) but I think the limit is 7.5 or 7 maybe, so you really are borderline. I'm so surprised you weren't given any further info...? I was sent a Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

To aid in diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The test shouldONLY be used to help diagnose diabetes in patients with equivocalor borderline fasting glucose levels. The test should NOT be carried out on patients with clearlyabnormal glucose results; patients with clear symptoms of diabetesshould have a fasting glucose level measured and a GTT should ONLYbe requested if this is equivocal. Fasting glucose and a second sample collected 2 hours after a75g glucose load On request; patients must make an appointment with thelaboratory for this test Previous borderline or equivocal glucose results Patient must fast overnight (10 hours) and be advised that theymay only drink plain water during this period. Medicationshould be taken normally. Plasma sample collected into fluoride-oxalate preservative Patients must have 'normal' carbohydrate intake for 3 daysbefore the test; restricting carbohydrate intake may give a falselydiabetic picture Patients must have normal levels of exercise for the 3 dayspreceding the test [the test should be avoided in hospitalin-patients on poor diet and having limited exercise] Patients must fast correctly before the test 75g dose of glucose is given as a drink, which must be consumedwithin 5 minutes A second glucose sample is collected 2 hrs later The patient must sit quietly during this 2 hours, resting. Theymust not smoke or eat during this time but may drink plainwater. Not meeting specific criteria foranalysis. Continue reading >>

Borderline Glucose Tolerance Test Results

Borderline Glucose Tolerance Test Results

Borderline Glucose Tolerance Test results DW had her short GTT yesterday and the result was 0.8 (midwife said 0.7 is top end of normal). They've told us to do the longer test but we're wondering if it's necessary. Yesterday morning DW had some jam (forgot about the test) so the results are probably high because of that? I had the first (shorter) GD test done and my results came back elevated.I was worried when they sent me for the longer test.I just found out that my second test results came back fine. In the book "What to Expect When you are Ecpecting", it states that approx. 85% of women who fail the first test will pass the second test.GD affects anywhere from 2-10% of women, making it the most popular problem for pregnant women.Because it is the most popular, it is also the EASIEST to take care of.Most women go on to have normal pregnancies and normal births and very normal babies and their GD goes away right after.(I think the book said 98% of women will not have GD after delivery). I don't think that jam would raise her levels that much...but it could have been something she ate the day before too.I remember eating chocolate the night before my test. My suggestion is to go for the second test.If GD is left untreated, that is when there may be some problems. Good luck and let us know how it turns out! My first test came back at 8.0 so I was sent for the second one, great for someone with a severe needle phobia, NOT but I went and had it done hoping it would be fine. My second test came back at 7.9 so right on the border.My ob then sent me to a diabetes dietician to find out about diet, food etc and I ended up leaving there with a kit to check my blood sugar levels each day.I was shattered.I check my blood 4 times a day, 17 days to go and counting.It's ok and as lo Continue reading >>

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, is a condition that develops before someone gets type 2 diabetes. It’s also known as impaired fasting glucose or glucose intolerance. It basically means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but they’re not quite high enough to be considered diabetes. During the prediabetes phase, your pancreas usually still produces enough insulin in response to ingested carbohydrates. The insulin is less effective at removing the sugar from the bloodstream, though, so your blood sugar remains high. This condition is called insulin resistance. If you have prediabetes, you should know you’re not alone. In 2015, it was estimated that 84.1 million people age 18 and older had the condition. That’s 1 in 3 Americans. Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you’ll definitely develop diabetes. It is a warning of what could lie ahead, however. People with prediabetes have a 5 to 15-fold higher risk for type 2 diabetes than someone with normal blood sugar levels. Those chances increase if you don’t make any healthy changes to your diet or activity habits. “Prediabetes is not pre-problem,” says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Someone with insulin resistance in its early stages can develop type 2 diabetes if it continues long enough. Only 10 percent of people with prediabetes even know they have it because they don’t display any symptoms. “Often, people consider these symptoms part of their normal day, so they’re ignored,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and co-author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Any of these risk factors can increase your chances of developing prediabetes: being inacti Continue reading >>

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

If you are pregnant you will likely be tested during your second trimester for a condition known as gestational diabetes, which is a form of diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy. However, the test may have borderline results. You may be labeled as prediabetic. Following a healthy diet is one way to prevent prediabetes from developing into diabetes, and also helps maintain the health of you and your baby. Video of the Day A label of prediabetes means someone you are "almost" diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, prediabetes is the state in which your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but are not consistently high enough to be labeled diabetic. The glucose tolerance test taken during your pregnancy involves drinking a sweet beverage and having blood tested for glucose levels after certain intervals of time. If you have borderline results you may be advised to change your diet to prevent a full case of gestational diabetes from forming. Managing blood sugar levels during pregnancy involves two things: watching what you eat, and watching how much you eat. Portion size is important, according to the American Diabetes Association. However, the types of foods you eat have an impact as well. If you have prediabetes you may need to limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat, and you should focus on foods that are high in nutrition and low in calories. While every woman’s needs are different based on height, weight and general activity level, following a general guideline can help you keep blood glucose levels in check. If you have gestational diabetes you should limit your starchy or sweet carbohydrates to only about half of your daily caloric intake, according to Medline Plus. Carbohydrates include such foods as fruits and vegetable Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

The term borderline diabetes refers to a condition called prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is to be considered a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that 10 to 23 percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Prediabetes can be accompanied by other risk factors. It is associated with conditions such as obesity, especially abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood fat levels and low levels of "good" cholesterol. When these risk factors "cluster" together in a person, there is a higher risk of not just type 2 diabetes but heart disease and stroke as well. Other medical terms used when talking about prediabetes include: Symptoms of borderline diabetes Prediabetes is not the same as diabetes. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes have clear symptoms. Both can go unnoticed until prediabetes has progressed to type 2 diabetes, or until another complication such as a heart attack occurs. Some people may experience symptoms as their blood sugars remain high. Passing urine more often and increased thirst can be symptoms of type 2 diabetes before it is diagnosed and treated. Prediabetes is not found unless testing is done for it. Testing is carried out when there are risk factors that make prediabetes more likely. Causes and risk factors of borderline diabetes The main risk factors for prediabetes are being overweight or obese, not getting enough exercise, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include: Drinking a lot of high-sugar drinks may also increase the risk. One study found that people who regularly drink sugary products - 1 or 2 cans of soda a day, for ex Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test Results, Hospital Says Gd, Gp Says Igt7

Glucose Tolerance Test Results, Hospital Says Gd, Gp Says Igt7

Anyone had borderline results when they've had a GTT? My results were 7.8 after fasting and 8.3 after the glucose drink and 2 hrs. The hospital rang to say I have GD and that I've got to go in to see them this week, but my Gp says I've not got GD and that I'm glucose tolerance impaired. When I looked at the WHO guidelines they say a result over 11.1 is classified as GD, which 8.3 is nowhere near... Looks like even though I'm on the fence I will be forced into consultant led care and miss out on the birthing unit, gutted is an understatement. Anyone else had a borderline result and ended up back with midwife led care? Here are the NICE guidelines on GD: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng3/chapter/1-Recommendations#gestational-diabetes-2 . based on these it sounds like GD is the correct diagnosis for you. For what it's worth I got much lower results than yours and have been diagnosed with GD, as has a friend of mine, though in both cases we have been told that we are most definitely borderline. My fasting reading was 5.5 and after the glucose drink my reading was within limits (I think it was 5.8). A friend of mine was diagnosed with GD last week with fasting reading of 5.3 and a similar reading as mine for the second test (so under threshold). Despite my readings being below threshold - they asked me to monitor my diet for 2 weeks anyway. In those 2 weeks I was given steriods, had to fast for 18 hours twice due to needing to be anesthetised, was over night in hospital twice (ironically hospital food is not GD friendly!), and lost a baby (I was expecting twins) so needless to say it isn't surprising that some of my readings in those two weeks were a wee bit high at times. Annoyingly the diabetes consultants did not give me any slack and I now find myself on metformin and inject Continue reading >>

My Gtt Result Was Close To Borderline - Should I Be Worried?

My Gtt Result Was Close To Borderline - Should I Be Worried?

My GTT result was close to borderline - should I be worried? You may view most areas of the forum without registering. If you wish to post, you do need to register . It's FREE! My GTT result was close to borderline - should I be worried? I had the 2 hour GD test due to having extra risk factors - over 35 and fat (thanks a lot doc). Anyway my result was 7.5 and cut off is 7.8. Nobody seemed to care but is this not a bit close to borderline? I am thinking I should change my diet etc anyway ... I don't eat a lot of sugar though but I do eat pasta, weetbix etc. Just as a general health thing I don't want to be veering towards developing diabetes.. My friend had a borderline gtt and was told it would be sensible to to go onto a low gi diet, she did it, lost 3 kgs in the 3rd tri and felt brilliant. Hmm that is interesting. I've been looking at low GI diet recipes but in honesty it's not that different to how I eat already which I feel isn't a great sign. (Been trying to minimise weight gain). I can swap white pasta for wholemeal... mayeb I shouldn't be eating pasta at all? or white rice? That's going to really suck. The test is pretty inaccurate and there isn't much else they would do apart from tell you to eat healthy which it sounds like you already doing. I won't even be having the test I don't see how it serves any purpose other than making a woman doubt herself and become fearful. One of the best things for controlling blood sugar is exercising. Just 30 min of gentle exercise will help to stablise blood sugar for the next 24 hours. Then you know common sense, eat little sugar and fats, brown rice, brown pasta etc. I have to have the 2 hour test too... My ob told me to wait til 27 weeks because its more likely to find something... Apparently i am at risk because ds was o Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test, The Gold Standard Prediabetes Test

Glucose Tolerance Test, The Gold Standard Prediabetes Test

The Glucose Tolerance Test For Prediabetes and More The glucose tolerance test is the best way to know if you are prediabetic. It is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, the existence of borderline diabetes (prediabetes), and gestational diabetes during pregnancy. It is also called the GTT or OGTT (the O is for oral). This test will detect hyperglycemia (too much sugar in the blood), but it cannot diagnose hypoglycemia (too little sugar in the blood) even if your fasting blood sugar is unusually low. Your doctor cannot tell you that you have chronic hypoglycemia from a single blood test, unfortunately. But he can use the GTT to prove that you are becoming sensitive to glucose from insulin resistance, the symptom of prediabetes. How To Prepare For the Glucose Tolerance Test It is very important to eat your normal diet in the days before the test and to keep your activity level the same, too. If you eat an unusually large meal the day before the test or do not stick to your regular eating routine, the GTT results will be inaccurate. Illness and infections mess up the test too. Also, you need to let your doctor know all the medications you are on because they may affect the results. Other things that can make your GTT test a false positive for diabetes are stress, trauma, heart attack and stroke. Anything that involves your pancreas, such as pancreatitis, will change your results. This is why the American Diabetic Association recommends doctors do the glucose tolerance test twice to be sure it is accurate. Your doctor will tell you to fast the night before the test and skip breakfast. You need to be without food for at least 8 hours before the test begins. At your doctor visit, the nurse will give you a fingerstick blood test, which might hurt for a second. The glucose monit Continue reading >>

3 Hour Glucose Test Results: “borderline” Gestational Diabetes

3 Hour Glucose Test Results: “borderline” Gestational Diabetes

Well, I got the results from that horrific 3 hour ordeal. They were not what I hoped. I am considered “borderline” gestational diabetic. Basically what that means is that I am now on a doctor supervised meal plan for the duration of the pregnancy and have to go in for a blood draw every other week to make sure my blood sugar is where it’s supposed to be. On the plus side, since I’m only borderline, I don’t have to measure my own blood sugar multiple times a day and I don’t have to take any medication. I was talking to my grandparents the other night, and they had never heard of gestational diabetes. So for those of you who don’t know what I’m talking about, here’s a brief overview: gestational diabetes (GD) affects about 18%of pregnancies. No one knows what causes it, but the key risk factors are women who: are overweight, have a family history of diabetes, previously had a large baby (9 lbs) or more, had gestational diabetes in the past, had a baby who died before birth, or are Latina, African American, South or East Asian or Pacific Islander. (For what it’s worth, I have none of those risk factors.) The main risks associated with GD are that the baby can grow too large and have to be born early via c-section, The baby’s blood sugar can be low. The baby’s organs might not be fully developed. Risks to the mother may include preeclampsia, shortness of breath and risk of infection. Fortunately, for the vast majority of women, the condition goes away after the baby is born. My blood draw results were a little odd. Only one of the four draws was above the normal range. The weird part is that my blood sugar spiked in the middle of the test, even though I hadn’t eaten anything. When I questioned whether that could be a real result or whether the lab Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

Just Got Diagnosed With Borderline Gestational Diabetes!

Just Got Diagnosed With Borderline Gestational Diabetes!

Just got diagnosed with Borderline Gestational Diabetes! Hey Ladies! I just got the phone call that I was diagnosed with Borderline Gestational Diabetes. I didn't know there was a borderline situation. I'm 28 weeks as of today. But, the nurse just told me that I will have to meet with a nutritionist and go forward as if I have Gestational Diabetes. I'm very upset, nervous, scared, etc. Just wondered if this has happened to any of you. Thanks! My dr informed me that I am borderline as well. She said just to watch my carb and sugar intake, and things will be fine. I don't think it's anything to stress about, just makes us more cautious of what we are putting in our mouths. Best of luck! I received the same diagnosis 2 weeks ago. I have been somewhat following the GD diet but found that I was way too hungry all the time ( I was a little underweight prepregnancy). After meeting with the nutritionist and talking to my doctor, I have been eating more frequently and when I'm hungry but I've completely cut out all sugar and am really watching the carbs. I was devastated at first but it hasn't been that bad. Good luck with everything! I was diagnosed last week with GD and at first i was confused, overwhelmed and felt guilty. Firstly this is not your fault, GD is thought to be caused by hormones and if you are gonna get it, you get it. I spent the first week watching my diet, the only way I could achive the sugar levels I needed was to follow a complete Atkins style diet which is not good as we still need some carbs for us and baby. After a week of it I am now on insulin (I refused the pills for various reasons). Its not so bad. Just be aware of what you are eating and as you are borderline you should be able to control it with diet. But also sugar levels can increase as pregnan Continue reading >>

The Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

The Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

The Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) is a common test performed in pregnancy. The GTT may be suggested to you if your health care provider thinks you fall into risk groups for developing gestational diabetes or if you are showing symptoms of gestational diabetes in your routine clinical checks. Gestational Diabetes – What is it and how does it affect you and your baby? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that you get in pregnancy. You do not need to be a diabetic to develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is when you have a high level of sugar in your blood due to chemical changes in your body during pregnancy. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down your food and converts it into a sugar called glucose. The glucose enters your blood stream. Your pancreas secretes a hormone called insulin. Insulin works with glucose to create fuel for your cells. With diabetes, your body is not able to make enough insulin to convert the glucose to energy and as a result, your blood will show high levels of sugar. Hormones in pregnancy can sometimes change the way our body produces or reacts to insulin. For most women, the pancreas simply makes changes to keep up with these demands. However, if this does not happen, sugar levels rise in the blood, resulting in gestational diabetes. Between 2-5 in 100 pregnant women will have gestational diabetes. (HSE) There are often no symptoms with gestational diabetes, however, some women may experience extreme tiredness or routine clinical urine tests may show sugar is present. If not controlled, gestational diabetes can cause serious complications for you and your baby such as: * placenta abruption – when you placenta comes away from the wall of your womb * premature birth * macrosomia (your baby measures larger for dates) Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

A glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test checks how well the body processes blood sugar (glucose). It involves comparing the levels of glucose in the blood before and after drinking a sugary drink. The results of this test can help doctors to detect type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance). It is also used to help diagnose diabetes in pregnancy. How does a glucose tolerance test work? In most people a simple blood test is enough to detect diabetes. However, some people have 'borderline' results on routine blood tests and then a glucose tolerance test may help. Also, a glucose tolerance test can show when the body can't manage blood sugar (glucose) levels well but not yet to the stage of diabetes. This is known as pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance) and is a condition that can lead to diabetes. In healthy people, glucose levels in the blood always rise after a meal but they soon return to normal as the glucose is used up or stored. A glucose tolerance test helps to distinguish between this normal pattern and the patterns seen in diabetes and pre-diabetes. Prior to a glucose tolerance test you are asked not to eat for a certain length of time before the test. Then you drink a sugary drink. Normally, the body should quickly move glucose from the blood into the body's cells. This would reduce the amount of glucose found in the blood samples taken. If there is a problem moving glucose into the cells, glucose remains in the bloodstream. This shows as a higher level of glucose in the blood samples. When the results of the blood samples come back, doctors compare the level of glucose found in your blood Continue reading >>

Which Cutoff Level Should Be Used In Screening For Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy? Definition Of Screening Methods For Gestational Diabetes Study Group Of The Lombardy Section Of The Italian Society Of Diabetology.

Which Cutoff Level Should Be Used In Screening For Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy? Definition Of Screening Methods For Gestational Diabetes Study Group Of The Lombardy Section Of The Italian Society Of Diabetology.

Diabetes and Metabolic Unit, I Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Niguarda Hospital, Milan, Italy. Our purpose was to examine the validity of 140 mg/dL cutoff value in oral glucose challenge test screening for gestational diabetes mellitus when including in the group to be identified women fulfilling more inclusive Carpenter and Coustan criteria for 100-g oral glucose tolerance testing interpretation and gravid women with borderline glucose intolerance. We reanalyzed data of a multicenter study performed on 704 pregnant women screened at the twenty-fourth to twenty-eighth week with a 50-g oral glucose challenge test followed by a universal 100-g oral glucose tolerance test. We used receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis, assembling positive and negative groups according to the different criteria adopted in oral glucose tolerance test interpretation (National Diabetes Data Group or Carpenter-Coustan) and in assignment of women with borderline glucose intolerance. Besides the statistical cutoff value, defined by the Youden index (Sensitivity + Specificity - 1), we also selected a "high-sensitivity" cutoff value, identified by the maximal sensitivity associated with >70% specificity. With use of National Diabetes Data Group criteria, the statistical and high-sensitivity cutoff values were set at 142 mg/dL when the positive group included only women with positive oral glucose tolerance test results and at 140 mg/dL when it also included subjects with borderline glucose intolerance. With use of Carpenter-Coustan criteria, the statistical cutoff value was set at 141 mg/dL when the positive group included only women with positive oral glucose tolerance test results and at 140 mg/dL when it also included subjects with borderline glucose intolerance; the high-sensi Continue reading >>

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