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Glucose Test 210

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Does this test have other names? Glucose, postprandial; glucose, two-hour postprandial; two-hour PPG; two-hour postprandial blood sugar What is this test? This is a blood test to check for diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar in check. This means your blood sugar levels are too high, and over time this can lead to serious health problems including nerve and eye damage. This test is done to see how your body responds to sugar and starch after you eat a meal. As you digest the food in your stomach, blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels rise sharply. In response, your pancreas releases insulin to help move these sugars from the blood into the cells of muscles and other tissues to be used for fuel. Within two hours of eating, your insulin and blood glucose levels should return to normal. If your blood glucose levels remain high, you may have diabetes. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if your healthcare provider wants to see if you have diabetes or another insulin-related disorder, especially if you have symptoms such as: Frequent urination Unusual thirst Blurred vision Tiredness Repeated infections Sores that heal slowly If you're pregnant, you may have this test to screen for gestational diabetes, diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Treating gestational diabetes reduces the risk for health problems for you and your baby. What other tests might I have with this test? Your healthcare provider may order other tests to confirm or evaluate whether you have diabetes. These may include: Fasting blood glucose test. This measures the amount of sugar in your blood. A1C (glycosylated hemoglobin) test. This measures your average blood sugar level over the last 2 to 3 months. Glucose tolerance test. This m Continue reading >>

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Two-hour Postprandial Glucose

Does this test have other names? Glucose, postprandial; glucose, two-hour postprandial; two-hour PPG; two-hour postprandial blood sugar What is this test? This is a blood test to check for diabetes. If you have diabetes, your body doesn't make enough insulin to keep your blood sugar in check. This means your blood sugar levels are too high, and over time this can lead to serious health problems including nerve and eye damage. This test is done to see how your body responds to sugar and starch after you eat a meal. As you digest the food in your stomach, blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels rise sharply. In response, your pancreas releases insulin to help move these sugars from the blood into the cells of muscles and other tissues to be used for fuel. Within two hours of eating, your insulin and blood glucose levels should return to normal. If your blood glucose levels remain high, you may have diabetes. Why do I need this test? You may need this test if your healthcare provider wants to see if you have diabetes or another insulin-related disorder, especially if you have symptoms such as: Frequent urination Unusual thirst Blurred vision Tiredness Repeated infections Sores that heal slowly If you're pregnant, you may have this test to screen for gestational diabetes, diabetes that can develop during pregnancy. Treating gestational diabetes reduces the risk for health problems for you and your baby. What other tests might I have with this test? Your healthcare provider may order other tests to confirm or evaluate whether you have diabetes. These may include: Fasting blood glucose test. This measures the amount of sugar in your blood. A1C (glycosylated hemoglobin) test. This measures your average blood sugar level over the last 2 to 3 months. Glucose tolerance test. This m Continue reading >>

My Neighbor's Blood Sugar Is 210! What Can I Do To Instantly Lower It?

My Neighbor's Blood Sugar Is 210! What Can I Do To Instantly Lower It?

My neighbor's Blood Sugar is 210! What can I do to instantly lower it? It's late at night and I can't get him to the doctor until tomorrow. Update: He is 85 and has been lethargic all day after eating 5 or 6 valentines candies for breakfast. I'm a nurse but we live in the boonies. I'll check it in the AM to see if it came down. Update 2: BTW, he is not diagnosed as being a diabetic. But I have a feeling that's going to change... Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Slow down and quit being a drama nurse !!First of all you didn't say when you checked his blood sugar. 210 is high but not critical. And at 85 I don't think he is going to exercise much, so mostly he is just going to have to watch what he eats and start on medication. Metformin to start. For exercise a treadmill would be a good start. Its safer than walkin' around the Boonies. Don't worry. With a blood sugar of 210 he won't be feeling great, but he'll be fine. Don't listen to the people saying that he'll go into a diabetic coma; it would take a loonnngggg time for him to. Just bring him to the doctor tomorrow --- or the emergency room if you can't get an early appointment. If you/he's really worried, you can try exercising, that lowers it. Just taking a jog, walk, etc. And if you're looking for a subtler method, try drinking some water. It won't make a drastic impact like exercise, but it will help a little, and may make him feel better. And if he's on insulin, call the hospital he goes to for checkups, and the'll tell you what to do. Honestly, though, they probably won't tell him to do anything. 210 is NOT dangerous, at least not for a diabetic. Highs happen; the only thing you can usually do is wait for the next injection and raise the dosage. A blood sugar of 210 is NOT AN EMERGENCY! Continue reading >>

New Research On High Glucose Levels

New Research On High Glucose Levels

American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines advise “lowering A1C to below or around 7%” and postprandial (after-meal) glucose levels to 180 mg/dl or below. But new research shows that these glucose levels damage blood vessels, nerves, organs, and beta cells. An article by diabetes blogger Jenny Ruhl analyzes at what blood glucose level organ damage starts. According to Ruhl, research shows that glucose can do harm at much lower levels than doctors had thought. This news could be discouraging or even terrifying. If it’s hard to meet your current glucose goals, how will you reach tighter goals? Such news might make some people give up. But remember, a high postprandial or fasting reading won’t kill you. All we know is that higher numbers correlate with higher chances of complications. You have time to react. In fact, we could choose to look at this as good news. We all know of people who developed complications despite “good control.” But complications are not inevitable; it’s just that so-called “good control” wasn’t really all that good. First, the numbers. “Post-meal blood sugars of 140 mg/dl [milligrams per deciliter] and higher, and fasting blood sugars over 100 mg/dl [can] cause permanent organ damage and cause diabetes to progress,” Ruhl writes. For nerve damage, University of Utah researchers studied people with painful sensory neuropathy, or nerve damage. They found that participants who did not have diabetes but who had impaired glucose tolerance on an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT, (meaning that their glucose levels rose to between 140 mg/dl and 200 mg/dl in response to drinking a glucose-rich drink) were much more likely to have a diabetic form of neuropathy than those with lower blood glucose levels. The higher these OGTT num Continue reading >>

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

10 Things To Consider If Your Blood Sugar Is High

I just read Catherine’s piece about a series of pump and insulin failures (It’s great! Read it!), and I had to shake my head in that oh-I-so-feel-you way. I’m going on nearly two decades as a diabetic now, but Friday night was a first for me, and one of the worst blood sugar nights I have ever had. I had been trending insulin resistant for a few days — requiring on average about 22 units of insulin per day rather than the standard 14 or 15. This was not too surprising, as — well, I suppose I meant to write a piece announcing this, but it hasn’t happened yet, so here goes nothing– I’m pregnant, and the hormonal ups and downs lead to periodic changes in insulin requirements. Still, heading into Friday night, my insulin behaved like water, and I was just pumping it in with relatively little return on investment. By the evening, I had used some 25 units for the day. Now, being pregnant, hyperglycemia is my bogeyman. Hyperglycemia is bad bad bad. And not just standard, over 200 hyperglycemia. I now begin to panic when I hit 130 mg/dL. So before bed, when I began to climb to 120, 130, I bolused excessively and walked in circles, trying to bring myself back down. I stayed up for an extra hour, waiting, walking, bolusing. Finally I was closer to 100 mg/dL, and went to bed, annoyed to have had to stay awake longer than desired. To my chagrin, not an hour later, my CGM woke me up with its buzzing: HIGH. I cursed, got out of bed, measured myself. 139 mg/dL. Damn you, diabetes. Under normal, non-pregnant circumstances, I would bolus and go back to bed. Now, the risk of going up is too high, and I want to make sure I go down first. I left the bedroom, and proceeded to walk and bolus and wait and walk and bolus and wait and watch lame Netflix movies. Cursing diabetes Continue reading >>

Accu-chek Guide Blood Glucose Meter Mg / Dl Plus 10-210 Test Strips - Nip | Ebay

Accu-chek Guide Blood Glucose Meter Mg / Dl Plus 10-210 Test Strips - Nip | Ebay

Details about Accu-Chek Guide Blood Glucose Meter MG / DL Plus 10-210 Test Strips - NIP Accu-Chek Guide Blood Glucose Meter MG / DL Plus 10-210 Test Strips - NIP Please enter a quantity of $qty_dummy$ or less Please enter a quantity of 1 Purchases are limited to $qty_dummy$ per buyer Please enter quantity of 1 or more Please enter a lower number Choose quantity that is less than $qty_dummy1$ or equal to $qty_dummy$ You can only choose quantity that is equal to $qty_dummy$ See details about international shipping here. help icon for Shipping - opens a layer Items shipping internationally may be subject to customs processing depending on the item's declared value. Sellers set the item's declared value and must comply with customs declaration laws. Buyers may be subject to additional charges for customs clearance. Visit eBay's page on international trade . (amount confirmed at checkout) To be provided at checkout help icon for Shipping - opens a layer This amount includes applicable customs duties, taxes, brokerage and other fees. This amount is subject to change until you make payment. For additional information, see the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions- opens in a new window or tab This amount includes applicable customs duties, taxes, brokerage and other fees. This amount is subject to change until you make payment. If you reside in an EU member state besides UK, import VAT on this purchase is not recoverable. For additional information, see the Global Shipping Program terms and conditions- opens in a new window or tab Estimated delivery dates - opens in a new window or tab include seller's handling time, origin ZIP Code, destination ZIP Code and time of acceptance and will depend on shipping service selected and receipt of cleared payment - opens in a new Continue reading >>

I Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Bad! Is There Any Hope?

I Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Bad! Is There Any Hope?

I failed the 1 hour glucose BAD! Is there any hope? I failed the 1 hour glucose test by 41 points! I am going in to take the 3 hour test tomorrow... has anyone failed the 1 hour that bad and ended up NOT having GD? As of right now I have no hope. @Jorgensen4 Failed mine too (162). 3hr isn't until next week though. Hopefully we only failed due to holiday poor eating habits but that it's really not GD! @Jorgensen4 Just took mine and am nevrous about the results, which isn't helping mysleeping either. Oh I hope all of us pass the 3 hour! I am so nervous! I am now taking it on Friday so I will have to wait until at least Monday for the results! Let me know how both of you do! Good luck! @Jorgensen4 My one hour was 184, doctor isn't even doing the 3 hour he said I have GD for certain. I just started checking my blood sugar 4 Xs a day. They are trying diet control for now. I went and saw a GD dietitian and started eating the way she recommended. I am so hungry all the time and NO Sugar. It is hard.... But, I keep telling myself only a few months and it is for my baby. Good Luck, I hope you pass your 3 hour! @Jorgensen4 With my DD I failed the 1 hr with a 174 but passed the 3 hr. Still waiting to find out this time around. I hate the 3 hr test. HATE IT!! I'm going in for my 3 hour this morning. I really hope I pass!!! @MissRachael555 What's considered really high? Mine was 160... It's supposed to be 120 right? This stinks! I go tomorrow for my 3 hour as well. ;( failed mine too. on my way to take 3 hour. doctor said i shouldnt have eaten before test, but the nurse said i could!! i hope we all pass @Jorgensen4 I failed my one hour by 11 points and went on to pass my three hour. Good luck! @Jorgensen4 Hey there, I'd have to say that you have nothing to worry about. At Kaiser, w Continue reading >>

Same Day, Affordable Glucose Test In Richardson, Tx | Request A Test

Same Day, Affordable Glucose Test In Richardson, Tx | Request A Test

Notice: An order must be placed with Request A Test prior to arriving at the lab listed above Same day and Affordable Glucose Test , Locations Nationwide Whether you're monitoring your diabetes or evaluating your general health, Request A Test offers an affordable and convenient Glucose Test in Richardson, TX. This test measures the amount of glucose or sugar in the blood. Ordering your own testing is a great way to take charge of your health. We offer this same day test with results as soon as one business day. No appointment is necessary. Simply order your test, go to your local lab and see your results online. In addition to this test, Request A Test provides a variety of Glucose testing options in Richardson with affordable, upfront pricing and no hidden fees or additional charges. For more savings, we provide a number of discounted testing packages that bundle popular lab tests together. Many of them like the Diabetes Panel , the Lipid and Glucose Test , Comprehensive Metabolic Panel and Know Your Numbers include the Glucose Test. Be sure to check out our monthly testing specials for additional discounts. Request A Test works with two of the largest CLIA certified labs in the US, to make sure our clients have access to the most up to date lab testing technology available with prompt and accurate results. We provide the same lab tests that are ordered every day by doctors and hospitals. Check our location finder at to choose a convenient location inRichardson, TXfor your Glucose Test. There are a number of companies which offer online lab testing. When choosing who to give your business to, there are some things you should consider. Request A Test follows all HIPAA guidelines to keep you private medical information secure. Test results are accessible only through y Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

The glucose tolerance test is a medical test in which glucose is given and blood samples taken afterward to determine how quickly it is cleared from the blood.[1] The test is usually used to test for diabetes, insulin resistance, impaired beta cell function,[2] and sometimes reactive hypoglycemia and acromegaly, or rarer disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. In the most commonly performed version of the test, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a standard dose of glucose is ingested by mouth and blood levels are checked two hours later.[3] Many variations of the GTT have been devised over the years for various purposes, with different standard doses of glucose, different routes of administration, different intervals and durations of sampling, and various substances measured in addition to blood glucose. History[edit] The glucose tolerance test was first described in 1923 by Jerome W. Conn.[4] The test was based on the previous work in 1913 by A. T. B. Jacobson in determining that carbohydrate ingestion results in blood glucose fluctuations,[5] and the premise (named the Staub-Traugott Phenomenon after its first observers H. Staub in 1921 and K. Traugott in 1922) that a normal patient fed glucose will rapidly return to normal levels of blood glucose after an initial spike, and will see improved reaction to subsequent glucose feedings.[6][7] Testing[edit] Since the 1970s, the World Health Organization and other organizations interested in diabetes agreed on a standard dose and duration. Preparation[edit] The patient is instructed not to restrict carbohydrate intake in the days or weeks before the test.[citation needed] The test should not be done during an illness, as results may not reflect the patient's glucose metabolism when healthy. A full adult dose should not be Continue reading >>

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

4 December 2012why Is My Blood Glucose So High When I Wake Up?

It doesn't seem fair, does it? You haven't eaten anything all night and you still wake up with high blood glucose! What is going on and how can you lower it? For those of you with diabetes, this post is for you! Basics Your body strives to keep blood glucose (BG) within a safe range, but with diabetes the balance is disturbed. The insulin your pancreas produces might not be sufficient to cover your BG lowering needs. As well, the insulin it does produce might not be handled properly by target body cells. And to make matters worse, your liver might be on glucose production overdrive. All of this results in your body's failure to control BG overnight as well as after meals or snacks. For more basic information about diabetes, please be sure to read my article, Diabetes Basics at MyNetDiary's library. Dawn Phenomenon Due to normal daily changes in our body's release of hormones during sleep and wake cycles, BG typically starts to rise in the very early morning – starting about 3 AM - and continues to rise as the morning progresses. For folks without diabetes, insulin production simply increases and takes care of the rising BG. However, for folks with diabetes, unless there is medication on board to cover this early morning rise, BG will eventually rise out of target range by the time they wake up. The classic pattern is to see BG within target range at both bedtime and during the middle of the night, and then see a high fasting BG. If you have noticed that your fasting BG is creeping up over time and is no longer within target range despite sticking to a carb controlled eating plan and taking your diabetes medication as prescribed, then it might be time to talk with your doctor about your diabetes medication. The type, dose, and/or timing might need to be adjusted to bet Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Pregnancy is a wondrous and exciting time. It’s a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives. Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women don’t develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.) Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth. Maternal hyperglycemia can stimulate fetal hyperinsulinemia, and lead to neonatal hypoglycemia when the glucose supply (umbilical cord) is cut. Because of all these increased risks, home deliveries are not typically recommended for women with any form of diabetes. As many as two thirds of all women with diabetes have unplanned pregnancies and most women don’t realize that they’re pregnant until six or more weeks into the pregnancy. That’s why it’s critically important for women who have diabetes to use contraception and achieve tight blood sugar control prior to conception. Many health-care providers suggest at least three to six months of stable blood sugar control prior to attempting to conceive. Hemoglobin A1c should be within 1 percentage point above the lab normal, which means striving for a HbA1c of less than 7 percent. Women using or Continue reading >>

I Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Bad! Is There Any Hope?

I Failed The 1 Hour Glucose Bad! Is There Any Hope?

I failed the 1 hour glucose BAD! Is there any hope? I failed the 1 hour glucose test by 41 points! I am going in to take the 3 hour test tomorrow... has anyone failed the 1 hour that bad and ended up NOT having GD? As of right now I have no hope. @Jorgensen4 Failed mine too (162). 3hr isn't until next week though. Hopefully we only failed due to holiday poor eating habits but that it's really not GD! @Jorgensen4 Just took mine and am nevrous about the results, which isn't helping mysleeping either. Oh I hope all of us pass the 3 hour! I am so nervous! I am now taking it on Friday so I will have to wait until at least Monday for the results! Let me know how both of you do! Good luck! @Jorgensen4 My one hour was 184, doctor isn't even doing the 3 hour he said I have GD for certain. I just started checking my blood sugar 4 Xs a day. They are trying diet control for now. I went and saw a GD dietitian and started eating the way she recommended. I am so hungry all the time and NO Sugar. It is hard.... But, I keep telling myself only a few months and it is for my baby. Good Luck, I hope you pass your 3 hour! @Jorgensen4 With my DD I failed the 1 hr with a 174 but passed the 3 hr. Still waiting to find out this time around. I hate the 3 hr test. HATE IT!! I'm going in for my 3 hour this morning. I really hope I pass!!! @MissRachael555 What's considered really high? Mine was 160... It's supposed to be 120 right? This stinks! I go tomorrow for my 3 hour as well. ;( failed mine too. on my way to take 3 hour. doctor said i shouldnt have eaten before test, but the nurse said i could!! i hope we all pass @Jorgensen4 I failed my one hour by 11 points and went on to pass my three hour. Good luck! @Jorgensen4 Hey there, I'd have to say that you have nothing to worry about. At Kaiser, w Continue reading >>

Patient Information On Fasting Samples And Glucose Testing

Patient Information On Fasting Samples And Glucose Testing

Patient Information on Fasting Samples and Glucose Testing Appointment Line: (210) 916-9900 | Information Desk: (210) 916-7500, 6500, 4141, 3400 Patient Information on Fasting Samples and Glucose Testing Fasting you should not eat or drink anything other than water for eight (8) hours before the test. Common tests that may require a fasting sample are glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides. Check with your provider or contact the laboratory at 210-916-5758 if you are unsure if you need to fast. Glucose Test may be measured on a fasting basis, randomly (anytime), post prandial (after a meal) or as part of an oral glucose tolerance test. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test is a series of glucose tests. A fasting sample is collected and then the patient drinks a standard amount of a glucose solution which is followed by one or more additional glucose tests performed at set intervals to measure the glucose levels over time. The test can take up to three (3) hours. YOU CAN NOT EAT DURING THE TEST. Post Prandial Glucose Test a fasting glucose sample is drawn and then an additional glucose test is drawn after a specified amount of time following a meal. Typically two (2) hours after eating. You are about to leave the Brooke Army Medical Center Web Site. This hyperlink does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army, or Brooke Army Medical Center of this Web site or the information, products or services contained therein. For other than authorized activities such as military exchanges and Morale, Welfare and Recreation sites, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Army, and Brooke Army Medical Center do not exercise any editorial control over the information you may find at these locations. Such links are provided consistent with the stated purpose of this DoD Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

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