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Glucose Intolerance Nhs

Lactose Intolerance In Children

Lactose Intolerance In Children

Lactose intolerance is a common digestive problem where the body is unable to digest lactose, a type of sugar mainly found in milk and dairy products. Symptoms of lactose intoleranceusually develop within a few hours of consuming foodor drink that contains lactose. They may include: The severity of your symptoms and when they appear depends on the amount of lactose you've consumed. Some people may still be able to drink a small glass of milk without triggering any symptoms, while others may not even be able to have milk in their tea or coffee. The symptoms of lactose intolerance can be similar to several other conditions, so it's important to see your GP for a diagnosis before removing milk and dairy products from your diet. For example, the symptoms above can also be caused by: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) a long-term disorder that affects the digestive system milk protein intolerance an adverse reaction to the protein in milk from cows (not the same as a milk allergy ) If your GP thinksyouhave lactose intolerance,they may suggest avoiding foods and drinks containing lactose for two weeks to see if your symptoms improve. Read more about diagnosing lactose intolerance The body digests lactose using a substance called lactase. This breaks down lactose into two sugars called glucose and galactose, which can be easily absorbed into the bloodstream. People withlactose intolerancedon't produce enough lactase, so lactose stays in the digestive system where it's fermented by bacteria. This leads to the production of various gases, which cause the symptoms associated with lactose intolerance. Depending on the underlying reason why the body isn't producing enough lactase, lactose intolerance may be temporary or permanent. Most cases that develop in adults are inherited and te Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes | Impaired Glucose Tolerance | Patient

Pre-diabetes | Impaired Glucose Tolerance | Patient

You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if you have pre-diabetes you are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes . Between 1 and 3 out of every 4 people with pre-diabetes will develop diabetes within ten years. It is also thought that having pre-diabetes increases your risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). Also, people who have pre-diabetes are more likely also to have other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure, raised cholesterol levels, being overweight, etc. See separate leaflets called Cardiovascular Disease (Atheroma) and Cardiovascular Health Risk Assessment for more details. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines someone as having pre-diabetes if they have: A fasting blood glucose of less than 7 mmol/L; and A blood glucose of 7.8 mmol/L or more but less than 11.1 mmol/L after a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test. However, the glucose tolerance test is rarely used now. The most commonly used test to identify pre-diabetes is now the HbA1c blood test. The WHO has recommended that an HbA1c blood test level of 4247 mmol/mol (6.0-6.5%) indicates a high risk of diabetes. Our quiz will help you discover whether y Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Uncontrolled when printed CHISCP49: Glucose Tolerance Test for Primary Care, Revision No 1 Expiry Date: 30 th November 2018 Authors: Biochemistry Standard Clinical Guideline Group Authorised by Julia Forsyth Page 1 of 4 Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology Guidelines The diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus should not be made on the basis of a single raised plasma glucose in the absence of symptoms. In 2011 WHO recommended the use of HbA1c as a test to diagnose (rather than just monitor) diabetes. This offers an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) that eliminates the need for patients to fast and wait for 2 hours for the test to be completed. However, HbA1c is contraindicated for diagnosis of diabetes in some situations – please see the Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology guideline ‘Diagnosis of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus using HbA1c’ at All glucose values in this document refer to venous plasma glucose levels. Glucose results obtained from “near patient†testing strips should not be used in the diagnosis of DM. INDICATIONS A GTT is indicated if HbA1c is contraindicated and: a) there is impaired fasting glycaemia, (fasting plasma glucose >6.0 mmol/L, but <7.0 mmol/L) b) previous history of gestational diabetes c) there is a possible low renal threshold for glucose i.e. glycosuria and random glucose <11.1 mmol/L. CONTRAINDICATIONS None SIDE EFFECTS Occasionally nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea as the glucose drink is hyperosmolar. PREPARATION The procedure can be carried out in the Phlebotomy Department at the LRCH or RDH. No appointment is necessary but the patient should come between 08:45 and 09:30. The test can also be carried out by appointment only at the phlebotomy clinics at Ripley Hospital and Babington Hospital. So Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. IGT may precede type 2 diabetes mellitus by many years. IGT is also a risk factor for mortality.[1] Diagnosis[edit] According to the criteria of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association, impaired glucose tolerance is defined as:[2][3][4] two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/l) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. A patient is said to be under the condition of IGT when he/she has an intermediately raised glucose level after 2 hours, but less than the level that would qualify for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose may be either normal or mildly elevated. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose.[5] Treatment[edit] Main article: Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 The risk of progression to diabetes and development of cardiovascular disease is greater than for impaired fasting glucose.[6] Although some drugs can delay the onset of diabetes, lifestyle modifications play a greater role in the prevention of diabetes.[5][7] Patients identified as having an IGT may be able to prevent diabetes through a combination of increased exercise and reduction of body weight.[5] "Drug therapy can be considered when aggressive lifestyle interventions are unsuccessful."[5] See also[edit] Glucose tolerance test Impaired fasting glucose [edit] Further reading[edit] Melanie J Davies; I Peter Gray (3 February 1996). "Impaired glucose tolerance". British Medical Journal. 312 (7026): 264–65. doi:10.1136/bmj.312.7026.264. PMC 2349870 . PMID 8611769. – Editorial review Nathan, DM; Davidson Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance means that blood glucose is raised beyond normal levels Impaired glucose tolerance means that blood glucose is raised beyond normal levels, but not high enough to warrant a diabetes diagnosis . With impaired glucose tolerance you face a much greater risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Treating impaired glucose tolerance may help to prevent diabetes development and lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. Eating a healthy, balanced diet is a key way of treating impaired glucose tolerance. Other ways to lower the risk include losing weight if you are overweight, and also taking regular physical exercise . Blood glucose levels are the amount of glucose in the blood, and normal blood glucose levels range from between 4-8 mmol/L. Blood glucose levels are often higher after eating and lower first thing in the morning. How often does impaired glucose tolerance develop into diabetes? 1-3 out of every 4 people with impaired glucose tolerance will develop diabetes within a decade. What else does impaired glucose tolerance leave you at risk of? People with impaired glucose tolerance face a greater risk of cardiovascular disease, including high blood pressure , increased cholesterol levels, being overweight or obese . What defines having impaired glucose tolerance? The WHO (World Health Organisation) indicates that impaired glucose tolerance may be present if people have: Blood glucose of 7.8 mmol/L or more but less than 11.1mmol/L after a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test OGTT (see below). How common is impaired glucose tolerance? Because there are no symptoms of impaired glucose tolerance, many people have the condition and are unaware of it. Diabetes UK estimates that some seven million people in the UK have impaired glucose tole Continue reading >>

Gluten Sensitivity - Coeliac Uk

Gluten Sensitivity - Coeliac Uk

Some people have gut symptoms when eating foods with ingredients containing gluten , ie wheat, barley and rye, even if they dont have coeliac disease. This is sometimes called non coeliac gluten sensitivity. The symptoms of non coeliac gluten sensitivity may be similar to those experienced by many people with coeliac disease, but it is not clear how the immune system might be involved and there does not appear to be damage to the lining of the gut. What is the difference between the conditions? Coeliac disease is a well defined, serious illness where the bodys immune system attacks itself when gluten is eaten. This causes damage to the lining of the gut and means that the body cannot properly absorb nutrients from food. Coeliac disease is not a food allergy or intolerance , it is an autoimmune disease . Wheat allergy is a reaction to proteins found in wheat, triggered by the immune system and usually occurs within seconds or minutes of eating. Non coeliac gluten sensitivity is when symptoms similar to coeliac disease are experienced, but there are no associated antibodies and no damage to the lining of the gut. Research into non coeliac gluten sensitivity Non coeliac gluten sensitivity is something that is being recognised as a problem in many countries across the world. This is a new area and there is a need for more research to understand the condition and who is at risk. The exact role of the immune system in non coeliac gluten sensitivity is unclear and further research is needed. There are no specific diagnostic tests for non coeliac gluten sensitivity. Some researchers define non coeliac gluten sensitivity as an improvement in symptoms when following a gluten-free diet . However, it is difficult to rule out the possibility of a placebo effect . There is also some Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test In Pregnancy

Glucose Tolerance Test In Pregnancy

Reference Number: HEY-290/2015 Departments: Maternity Services Translate the page Use the headphones button (bottom left) and then select the globe to change the language of the page. Need some help choosing a language? Please refer to the Browsealoud Supported Voices and Languages resource. This leaflet has been produced to give you general information. Most of your questions should be answered by this leaflet. It is not intended to replace the discussion between you and the healthcare team, but may act as a starting point for discussion. If after reading it you have any concerns or require further explanation, please discuss this with a member of the healthcare team. What is a glucose tolerance test? A Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) is a blood test that is used to diagnose gestational diabetes which can develop during pregnancy. The test measures your body’s ability to maintain a normal blood glucose (sugar) level. Why do I need a glucose tolerance test? In pregnancy, women who will be offered a GTT will have been identified as having one of the following: A raised body mass index (BMI) over 30kg/m². BMI is a measurement of your weight in kilograms and your height in metres. (A healthy BMI is below 25kg/m².) A previous baby over 4.5kg (9lbs 14oz). Confirmed gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy. Family origin (South Asian, Black African, Black Caribbean and Middle Eastern). First degree relative that has diabetes (mother/father/brother/sister). Can there be any complications or risks? We would like to reassure you that there is no risk to you or your baby when undertaking the GTT. How do I prepare for the glucose tolerance test? Please read the information leaflet. Share the information it contains with your partner and family (if you wish) so that they can b Continue reading >>

Food Intolerance - Nhs.uk

Food Intolerance - Nhs.uk

Afood intolerance isdifficulty digesting certain foods and having an unpleasant physical reaction to them. Itcausessymptoms, such as bloating and stomach pain,which usually come on a few hours after consuming the food. The number of people who believe they have a food intolerance has risen dramatically over recent years, but it'shard to know how many people are truly affected. Many people assumethey have afood intolerance when the true cause of their symptoms is something else. What are the symptoms of food intolerance? In general, people who have afood intolerance tend to experience: tummy pain , bloating, windand/or diarrhoea These symptoms usually come on a few hours after eating the food. It can be difficult to know for sure whether you have a food intolerance as these are very generalsymptoms, typical of many other conditions too. There are no tests for food intolerances. The only way to know if you have one is to monitor your symptoms and the food you eat. See what happens when you cut out the suspected food for a while, and then reintroduce it back into your diet. any symptoms you have after eating these foods Once you have a good idea which foods may be causing your symptoms, you can try excluding them from your diet one at a time and observing the effect this has. try cutting out the suspected food from your diet for two to six weeks and see if your symptoms improve reintroduce the food to see if symptoms return you may find you can tolerate a certain level, and you only get symptoms if you have more than this amount Consider seeing a dietitian to make sure you're receiving all your recommended daily nutrients while you do this trial. Find a registered dietitian . Never restrict your child's dietunless this has been advisedby adietitian oryour doctor. If you r Continue reading >>

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, is a condition that develops before someone gets type 2 diabetes. It’s also known as impaired fasting glucose or glucose intolerance. It basically means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but they’re not quite high enough to be considered diabetes. During the prediabetes phase, your pancreas usually still produces enough insulin in response to ingested carbohydrates. The insulin is less effective at removing the sugar from the bloodstream, though, so your blood sugar remains high. This condition is called insulin resistance. If you have prediabetes, you should know you’re not alone. In 2015, it was estimated that 84.1 million people age 18 and older had the condition. That’s 1 in 3 Americans. Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you’ll definitely develop diabetes. It is a warning of what could lie ahead, however. People with prediabetes have a 5 to 15-fold higher risk for type 2 diabetes than someone with normal blood sugar levels. Those chances increase if you don’t make any healthy changes to your diet or activity habits. “Prediabetes is not pre-problem,” says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Someone with insulin resistance in its early stages can develop type 2 diabetes if it continues long enough. Only 10 percent of people with prediabetes even know they have it because they don’t display any symptoms. “Often, people consider these symptoms part of their normal day, so they’re ignored,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and co-author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Any of these risk factors can increase your chances of developing prediabetes: being inacti Continue reading >>

Can You Be Allergic To Sugar?

Can You Be Allergic To Sugar?

Sugar is found in many parts of our diets, both in natural and manufactured foods. Cells in the body use sugar for energy, so an adverse reaction to sugar can cause serious complications. There are steps that people can take to avoid sugar and the complications of intolerance, and seeing a doctor is always recommended. Here are some key points about allergies. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. The symptoms of an allergy may vary from person to person. A severe allergy to something mixed in with sugar-containing foods can be cause for concern due to anaphylaxis . Sugar intolerance to certain sugars is not a true allergy. A person with a food allergy or intolerance will often manage it by keeping a food journal. An allergy can be confused with intolerance, but there are some distinct signs and symptoms. Symptoms of a food allergy vary from person to person and can even change depending on the type of food consumed. Symptoms such as clogged sinuses, headaches, and hives may indicate an allergic reaction. People who are allergic to certain components within food tend to experience symptoms after consuming them. Severe allergies can cause a serious reaction known as anaphylaxis. These reactions can come on quickly and may be fatal if left untreated. Symptoms of a severe anaphylactic response to an allergen can include: swelling of the lips, mouth, tongue, or throat shortness of breath or being unable to breathe properly People with severe allergies should carry antihistamine medications or epinephrine pens on them at all times. Anyone who experiences new signs of an allergic reaction should contact their doctor or allergist. Symptoms of anaphylaxis require medical attention immediately, even if the person has already taken antihistamine medicati Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

“Pre-diabetes label ‘worthless’, researchers claim,” reports the BBC. The headline is based on an opinion piece published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) by John Yudkin and Victor Montori, both of whom are professors of medicine. They argue that diagnosing people with “prediabetes” puts people at risk of unnecessary medicalisation and creates an unsustainable burden on healthcare systems. The piece is part of an ongoing BMJ series called “Too much medicine”, which is examining what is known as over-medicalising – treating “problems” that don’t actually require treatment. They argue that money would be better spent changing food, education, health and economic policies. This is an opinion piece. Although the authors support their opinions with studies, other evidence available could contradict their views. What is meant by ‘prediabetes’? Prediabetes is used to describe people at risk of diabetes because they have impaired glucose metabolism, but who do not meet the criteria for diabetes and often have no noticeable symptoms. It is a term that was introduced by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), but has not been accepted by other health organisations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO). It may be defined as: impaired glucose tolerance above normal glucose blood concentration after fasting above normal glycated haemoglobin (a marker of average blood glucose concentration) Supporters of the term’s usage argue that it allows doctors to identify high-risk patients, so they can be treated in order to prevent diabetes from occurring. What objections do the authors have about the use of the term? The authors point out that there has been little support for the ADA’s prediabetes label from other expert groups, including WHO, the Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, you should see your GP straight away if you have any symptoms of diabetes . To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again so they can explain the test results and what will happen next. What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. what high blood sugar means for your health your lifestyle for example, alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you, but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It's usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you, and write down any questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There's also a lot of information on diabetes available. Usually, the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication . It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right doses for you. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

To diagnose diabetes mellitus, gestational diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. If there are other clinical reasons for investigating glucose loading e.g. reactive hypoglycaemia or excessive growth hormone secretion then please contact the duty biochemist for alternative tests and protocols. Precautions & Contraindications for the Test: The test can be performed at the patient's surgery. It is important that the patient should have had normal meals during the last 3 days prior to the test and should not have been dieting. The test should be performed in the morning after an overnight fast [8 - 14 hours]. The patient should be sitting quietly and must not smoke during the test procedure. False results may occur if the patient has recently been ill or has had prolonged bed rest. Water drinking is permitted during the period of fasting and during the test procedure. For very young children: 2 x 0.25mL minicollect fluoride-oxalate tubes 1x bottle of POLYCAL [manufactured by Nutricia Clinical Care] - 113 mL of Polycal is equivalent to 75g of anhydrous glucose. Prepare the drink for the patient in advance as described below and keep in the fridge. Make 113 mL of Polycal up to 200 mL with drinking water and mix. Weigh the patient (children over 43 kg will require the full adult dose) 2.6 mL of Polycal is required for each kilogram body weight up to a maximum volume of 113 mL of Polycal For example: a 30 kg child would require 30 x 2.6 = 78 mL of Polycal Dilute the volume of Polycal required for body weight with an equal volume of water and mix. Take blood into a grey top fluoride-oxalate tube and label with specimen time and as "FASTING" as well as the usual patient identification requirements. Give the patient the prepared Polycal drink. Note the clock time. The drink sho Continue reading >>

4 Signs You Might Be Allergic To Sugar

4 Signs You Might Be Allergic To Sugar

You've heard it before: Sugar is bad for you. But Trevor Noah is taking it one step further—he says he has a sugar allergy. “I’m addicted to sugar, and allergic to it,” The Daily Show host says in a new interview with Us Weekly. “My skin turns red and puffy.” It sounds extreme but experts say you can actually be allergic or, more commonly, intolerant to sugar. “Sugar as a substance has a real impact on people, psychologically and physically,” New York City registered dietitian Jessica Cording tells SELF. However, people are usually intolerant to certain types of sugars, like fructose, sucrose, or lactose, rather than all sugars, certified dietitian-nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz, R.D., CEO of NY Nutrition Group, tells SELF. People with an actual sugar allergy may have immediate reactions like cramping, diarrhea, skin rash, or an itchy mouth, Moskovitz says, while those with an intolerance may just have gastrointestinal symptoms or fatigue. But it’s not always just sugar that’s the issue. “If someone describes a sugar intolerance, it's most likely an underlying issue that is being exacerbated by consuming foods with sugar,” says registered dietitian nutritionist Beth Warren, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Living a Real Life With Real Food. Instead, the problem may be a microbial imbalance in the gut with an overgrowth of yeast. Since yeast feeds on sugars, it could exacerbate the problem, causing symptoms like skin rashes and puffiness, she says. Unfortunately, it’s not just a matter of avoiding sweets: Natural sugars, like those found in fruits, can also cause problems for people with a sugar intolerance, provided they’re allergic to all sugars. “Any sugar, whether natural or added, will prompt the same issue,” Warren says. I Continue reading >>

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