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Glucose Intolerance Nhs

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. IGT may precede type 2 diabetes mellitus by many years. IGT is also a risk factor for mortality.[1] Diagnosis[edit] According to the criteria of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association, impaired glucose tolerance is defined as:[2][3][4] two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/l) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. A patient is said to be under the condition of IGT when he/she has an intermediately raised glucose level after 2 hours, but less than the level that would qualify for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose may be either normal or mildly elevated. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose.[5] Treatment[edit] Main article: Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 The risk of progression to diabetes and development of cardiovascular disease is greater than for impaired fasting glucose.[6] Although some drugs can delay the onset of diabetes, lifestyle modifications play a greater role in the prevention of diabetes.[5][7] Patients identified as having an IGT may be able to prevent diabetes through a combination of increased exercise and reduction of body weight.[5] "Drug therapy can be considered when aggressive lifestyle interventions are unsuccessful."[5] See also[edit] Glucose tolerance test Impaired fasting glucose [edit] Further reading[edit] Melanie J Davies; I Peter Gray (3 February 1996). "Impaired glucose tolerance". British Medical Journal. 312 (7026): 264–65. doi:10.1136/bmj.312.7026.264. PMC 2349870 . PMID 8611769. – Editorial review Nathan, DM; Davidson Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test In Pregnancy

Glucose Tolerance Test In Pregnancy

Reference Number: HEY-290/2015 Departments: Maternity Services Translate the page Use the headphones button (bottom left) and then select the globe to change the language of the page. Need some help choosing a language? Please refer to the Browsealoud Supported Voices and Languages resource. This leaflet has been produced to give you general information. Most of your questions should be answered by this leaflet. It is not intended to replace the discussion between you and the healthcare team, but may act as a starting point for discussion. If after reading it you have any concerns or require further explanation, please discuss this with a member of the healthcare team. What is a glucose tolerance test? A Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) is a blood test that is used to diagnose gestational diabetes which can develop during pregnancy. The test measures your body’s ability to maintain a normal blood glucose (sugar) level. Why do I need a glucose tolerance test? In pregnancy, women who will be offered a GTT will have been identified as having one of the following: A raised body mass index (BMI) over 30kg/m². BMI is a measurement of your weight in kilograms and your height in metres. (A healthy BMI is below 25kg/m².) A previous baby over 4.5kg (9lbs 14oz). Confirmed gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy. Family origin (South Asian, Black African, Black Caribbean and Middle Eastern). First degree relative that has diabetes (mother/father/brother/sister). Can there be any complications or risks? We would like to reassure you that there is no risk to you or your baby when undertaking the GTT. How do I prepare for the glucose tolerance test? Please read the information leaflet. Share the information it contains with your partner and family (if you wish) so that they can b Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Hollyoaks Medical Centre - Library - Behind The Headlines - Powered By Nhs Choices

Hollyoaks Medical Centre - Library - Behind The Headlines - Powered By Nhs Choices

Scientists may have uncovered a key reason why obese people have a raised risk of health complications such as type 2 diabetes, BBC News has said. According to... Scientists may have uncovered a key reason why obese people have a raised risk of health complications such as type 2 diabetes, BBC News has said. According to the news service, the link is due to pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a protein released from fat cells. The results of the study suggest that insulin resistance in obesity, and hence the increased likelihood of diabetes, may be partly caused by PEDF. Obese mice, which were resistant to insulin and had elevated blood glucose levels, also had elevated levels of PEDF. When PEDF was injected into lean mice, it also reduced their sensitivity to the effects of insulin, as might be seen in type 2 diabetes. This is worthy research, which has attempted to understand the possible biological mechanisms that link obesity and the increased risk of diabetes. However, as this is only an animal study, the situation may differ in humans. More research is needed to clarify whether this might have future treatment implications, such as techniques to block the action of PEDF and increase insulin sensitivity. For the general population, a healthy diet and lifestyle with regular exercise remains the best way to avoid obesity and the risk of complications such as type 2 diabetes. The research was carried out by Seamus Crowe and colleagues of Monash University, Australia and other institutions in Australia and the US. The studies were supported by research grants from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the Diabetes Australia Research Trust. Individual researchers also received scholarships and fellowship support. The study was publishe Continue reading >>

Food Intolerance - Nhs.uk

Food Intolerance - Nhs.uk

Afood intolerance isdifficulty digesting certain foods and having an unpleasant physical reaction to them. Itcausessymptoms, such as bloating and stomach pain,which usually come on a few hours after consuming the food. The number of people who believe they have a food intolerance has risen dramatically over recent years, but it'shard to know how many people are truly affected. Many people assumethey have afood intolerance when the true cause of their symptoms is something else. What are the symptoms of food intolerance? In general, people who have afood intolerance tend to experience: tummy pain , bloating, windand/or diarrhoea These symptoms usually come on a few hours after eating the food. It can be difficult to know for sure whether you have a food intolerance as these are very generalsymptoms, typical of many other conditions too. There are no tests for food intolerances. The only way to know if you have one is to monitor your symptoms and the food you eat. See what happens when you cut out the suspected food for a while, and then reintroduce it back into your diet. any symptoms you have after eating these foods Once you have a good idea which foods may be causing your symptoms, you can try excluding them from your diet one at a time and observing the effect this has. try cutting out the suspected food from your diet for two to six weeks and see if your symptoms improve reintroduce the food to see if symptoms return you may find you can tolerate a certain level, and you only get symptoms if you have more than this amount Consider seeing a dietitian to make sure you're receiving all your recommended daily nutrients while you do this trial. Find a registered dietitian . Never restrict your child's dietunless this has been advisedby adietitian oryour doctor. If you r Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 Diabetes - Getting Diagnosed - Nhs.uk

Type 2 diabetes is often diagnosed following blood or urine tests for something else. However, you should see your GP straight away if you have any symptoms of diabetes . To find out if you have type 2 diabetes, you usually have to go through the following steps: Your GP will check your urine and arrange a blood test to check your blood sugar levels. It usually takes about 1 to 2 days for the results to come back. If you have diabetes, your GP will ask you to come in again so they can explain the test results and what will happen next. What your GP will discuss with you during your appointment depends on the diagnosis and the treatment they recommend. what high blood sugar means for your health your lifestyle for example, alcohol and smoking Your GP will do their best to discuss the diagnosis with you, but this first appointment might only be 10 to 15 minutes. If you have questions about your diagnosis It's usually difficult to take in everything the GP tells you during the appointment. Talk to family and friends about what the GP told you, and write down any questions you have. Then make another GP appointment and take your list of questions with you. There's also a lot of information on diabetes available. Usually, the following things happen after your diagnosis: Your GP will prescribe medication . It might take time for you to get used to the medication and to find the right doses for you. Continue reading >>

Hollyoaks Medical Centre - Library - Behind The Headlines - Powered By Nhs Choices

Hollyoaks Medical Centre - Library - Behind The Headlines - Powered By Nhs Choices

Do artificial sweeteners raise diabetes risk? "Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes, claim scientists," reports The Guardian. But before you go clearing your fridge of diet colas, the research in question extensive as it was was mainly in mice "Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes, claim scientists," reports The Guardian. But before you go clearing your fridge of diet colas, the research in question extensive as it was was mainly in mice. The researchers' experiments suggest artificial sweeteners, particularly saccharin, change the bacteria thatnormally live in the gut and help to digest nutrients. These changes could reduce the body's ability to deal with sugar, leading to glucose intolerance, which can be an early warning sign of type 2 diabetes . Assessments in human volunteers suggested the findings might also apply to people. But human studiesso far arelimited. The researchers only directly tested the effect of saccharin in an uncontrolled study onjust seven healthy adults overthe course of aweek. It is far too early to claim with any confidence that artificial sweeteners could be contributing to the diabetes "epidemic". In the interim, if you are trying to reduce yoursugar intake to control your weight or diabetes, you can always try to do so without using artificial sweeteners. For example, drinking tap water is a far cheaper alternative to diet drinks. This study was carried out by researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science and other research centres in Israel. It was funded by the Weizmann Institute and the Nancy and Stephen Grand Israel National Center for Personalized Medicine, as well as grants from various research funders globally. The study was published in the peer-reviewed medical journal Nature. The Guardian covered this study well, Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test (GTT) diagnoses diabetes in pregnancy by checking how well your body regulates your blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, or GD, is a common pregnancy complication. It's thought to affect one pregnant woman in six. Although GD is common, testing for it is not routine. Your midwife will offer you the test only if she thinks there's a chance you could develop GD. Usually, you'll have the test when you’re between 24 weeks and 28 weeks pregnant. You could have the test earlier than this, usually at 16 weeks, depending on your medical history and where you live in the UK. For example, your midwife will offer the GTT sooner if you’ve had GD before. Why do I need a GTT? GD doesn’t often cause obvious symptoms, which is why testing is important. If GD isn’t recognised and treated it may put your health and your baby's health at risk. GD happens when your body fails to make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that keeps your blood sugar levels stable. It also helps your body to store sugar for when you need it later. During pregnancy, your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby’s needs, especially when he's growing rapidly. If your body can't make enough insulin, you may end up with too much sugar in your blood, resulting in GD. Having too much sugar in your blood may mean that your baby grows large. This increases your chances of having an induced labour, and a caesarean birth. GD, especially if it's not controlled, even raises the risk of a baby being stillborn. That's why it's so important to follow the advice of your midwife or doctor if you're diagnosed with GD. Am I at risk of developing GD? You’re more likely to develop GD if: Your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or above. You have previo Continue reading >>

Lactose Intolerance In Children

Lactose Intolerance In Children

Lactose intolerance is a common digestive problem where the body is unable to digest lactose, a type of sugar mainly found in milk and dairy products. Symptoms of lactose intoleranceusually develop within a few hours of consuming foodor drink that contains lactose. They may include: The severity of your symptoms and when they appear depends on the amount of lactose you've consumed. Some people may still be able to drink a small glass of milk without triggering any symptoms, while others may not even be able to have milk in their tea or coffee. The symptoms of lactose intolerance can be similar to several other conditions, so it's important to see your GP for a diagnosis before removing milk and dairy products from your diet. For example, the symptoms above can also be caused by: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) a long-term disorder that affects the digestive system milk protein intolerance an adverse reaction to the protein in milk from cows (not the same as a milk allergy ) If your GP thinksyouhave lactose intolerance,they may suggest avoiding foods and drinks containing lactose for two weeks to see if your symptoms improve. Read more about diagnosing lactose intolerance The body digests lactose using a substance called lactase. This breaks down lactose into two sugars called glucose and galactose, which can be easily absorbed into the bloodstream. People withlactose intolerancedon't produce enough lactase, so lactose stays in the digestive system where it's fermented by bacteria. This leads to the production of various gases, which cause the symptoms associated with lactose intolerance. Depending on the underlying reason why the body isn't producing enough lactase, lactose intolerance may be temporary or permanent. Most cases that develop in adults are inherited and te Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Basildon And Thurrock Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust - Blood Tests

Basildon And Thurrock Hospitals Nhs Foundation Trust - Blood Tests

All of our blood test centres are listed below, along with special arrangements for children's blood tests. There are 3 main centres and 13 outreach centres. Each centre has full details of opening times and booking requirements.All blood test centres are closed on Bank Holidays. St. Andrews Centre, Billericay 16-17 years old. Please book an appointment. Basildon Hospital and Orsett Hospital 11-17 years old. Please book Basildon Hospitalchildrens outpatient department (near the maternity unit). IMPORTANT: For all under 11 years childrens tests please call 01268 524900 ext 8167 to book an appointment. 9.20am-4.30pm Urgent and routine blood tests 11am-4.30 pm Urgent and routine blood tests Basildon University Hospital, Nethermayne, Basildon, Essex, SS16 5NL Basildon Hospital offers blood tests by pre-bookedappointment only - there is no walk-in facility. You can book a blood test appointment by clicking on the book online button below. You will be asked to specify your blood test requirements (such as glucose tolerance test, INR/Warfarin), and will then be shown the dates and times available. On your first booking you will be asked to register, and will receive an automatic email confirmation of your appointment. If you are unable to access the online booking system, you can book a blood test appointment by calling01702 746 065. Orsett Hospital, Rowley Road, Orsett, Essex, RM16 3EU Orsett Hospital offers blood test appointments. You can book a blood test appointment by clicking on the book online button below. You will be asked to specify your blood test requirements (such as glucose tolerance test, INR/Warfarin), and will then be shown the dates and times available. On your first booking you will be asked to register, and will receive an automatic email confirmation of Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Glucose Tolerance Test For Primary Care

Uncontrolled when printed CHISCP49: Glucose Tolerance Test for Primary Care, Revision No 1 Expiry Date: 30 th November 2018 Authors: Biochemistry Standard Clinical Guideline Group Authorised by Julia Forsyth Page 1 of 4 Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology Guidelines The diagnosis of Diabetes Mellitus should not be made on the basis of a single raised plasma glucose in the absence of symptoms. In 2011 WHO recommended the use of HbA1c as a test to diagnose (rather than just monitor) diabetes. This offers an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test (GTT) that eliminates the need for patients to fast and wait for 2 hours for the test to be completed. However, HbA1c is contraindicated for diagnosis of diabetes in some situations – please see the Southern Derbyshire Shared Care Pathology guideline ‘Diagnosis of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus using HbA1c’ at All glucose values in this document refer to venous plasma glucose levels. Glucose results obtained from “near patient†testing strips should not be used in the diagnosis of DM. INDICATIONS A GTT is indicated if HbA1c is contraindicated and: a) there is impaired fasting glycaemia, (fasting plasma glucose >6.0 mmol/L, but <7.0 mmol/L) b) previous history of gestational diabetes c) there is a possible low renal threshold for glucose i.e. glycosuria and random glucose <11.1 mmol/L. CONTRAINDICATIONS None SIDE EFFECTS Occasionally nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea as the glucose drink is hyperosmolar. PREPARATION The procedure can be carried out in the Phlebotomy Department at the LRCH or RDH. No appointment is necessary but the patient should come between 08:45 and 09:30. The test can also be carried out by appointment only at the phlebotomy clinics at Ripley Hospital and Babington Hospital. So Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Sugar Intolerance

Sugar Intolerance

Gastrointestinal discomfort can result from a number of issues including types foods ingested, volume of food, functional issues and speed at which food goes through the intestinal tract. Sugar intolerance and malabsorption has been found to be an issue for some individuals causing gastrointestinal distress, flatulence, bloating, diarrhea, fatigue and anemia. There are many different types of sugars and it is important to pin point which one is the culprit if you suspect intolerance or malabsorption. The different types of sugars found in the diet are found in single form as galactose, glucose and fructose which in different combinations form disaccharides called: sucrose, lactose and maltose. Glucose is usually present as starch and cellulose and is responsible for maintaining our blood sugar which the brain highly depends on. Fructose is also known as fruit sugar and is the sweetest of the sugars. Galactose is mostly found in milk products. Sugar Malabsorption (not to be confused with intolerance) is the inability in some people to break down sugars in the small intestine. It results in sugars being broken down into gases by bacteria in the large intestine, causing bloating, pain, diarrhea and flatulence. The inability to absorb sugars properly can lead to other nutrients being malabsorbed such as calcium and iron. Some studies have even associated fructose malabsorption with early stages of depression and mood disorders. It has also been found to be a trigger for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms (such as bloating, diarrhea, constipation, pain, gas). Fructose Malabsorption: Malabsorption of fructose is caused by the inability of the small intestine to absorb fructose appropriately due to a deficiency of the fructose carrier in the enterocytes. This causes the Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

“Pre-diabetes label ‘worthless’, researchers claim,” reports the BBC. The headline is based on an opinion piece published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) by John Yudkin and Victor Montori, both of whom are professors of medicine. They argue that diagnosing people with “prediabetes” puts people at risk of unnecessary medicalisation and creates an unsustainable burden on healthcare systems. The piece is part of an ongoing BMJ series called “Too much medicine”, which is examining what is known as over-medicalising – treating “problems” that don’t actually require treatment. They argue that money would be better spent changing food, education, health and economic policies. This is an opinion piece. Although the authors support their opinions with studies, other evidence available could contradict their views. What is meant by ‘prediabetes’? Prediabetes is used to describe people at risk of diabetes because they have impaired glucose metabolism, but who do not meet the criteria for diabetes and often have no noticeable symptoms. It is a term that was introduced by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), but has not been accepted by other health organisations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO). It may be defined as: impaired glucose tolerance above normal glucose blood concentration after fasting above normal glycated haemoglobin (a marker of average blood glucose concentration) Supporters of the term’s usage argue that it allows doctors to identify high-risk patients, so they can be treated in order to prevent diabetes from occurring. What objections do the authors have about the use of the term? The authors point out that there has been little support for the ADA’s prediabetes label from other expert groups, including WHO, the Continue reading >>

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