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Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy

Pregnancy And Subsequent Glucose Intolerance In Women Of Childbearing Ageheeding The Early Warning Signs For Primary Prevention Of Cardiovascular Disease In Women

Pregnancy And Subsequent Glucose Intolerance In Women Of Childbearing Ageheeding The Early Warning Signs For Primary Prevention Of Cardiovascular Disease In Women

The increased physiologic and metabolic demands of pregnancy act as a stress test that may reveal underlying subclinical disease or provide insight into future chronic disease. Pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes (GD) and hypertensive disorders, are early warning signs for chronic disease in women decades before the menopausal transition. More than 50 years ago, OSullivan and Mahan 1 developed criteria for the diagnosis of GD, glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy, based solely on observed higher rates of progression to diabetes in women many years postdelivery. A history of GD confers a 7-fold higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus and 3-fold higher cardiometabolic risk for women. In 2011, the American Heart Association added GD history to its CVD risk assessment for women based on the strong link to overt diabetes. 2 Until recently, evidence was insufficient to determine whether a history of GD elevated CVD risk independent of its association with overt diabetes and metabolic disease. Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy May Predict Cv Future

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy May Predict Cv Future

Glucose Intolerance in Pregnancy May Predict CV Future by Crystal Phend Crystal Phend, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today Explain to interested patients that gestational diabetes is linked to future risk of diabetes and cardiovascular risk, and that these results suggest the same may be true for lesser degrees of glycemic problems in pregnancy. Note that the study was based on administrative and insurance databases without direct monitoring of clinical events or test measurements. Mild glucose intolerance in pregnancy -- even if it doesn't rise to gestational diabetes -- may modestly predict future cardiovascular risk, according to a retrospective, population-based study. Women in that category had a 19% higher risk of cardiovascular disease over the subsequent 12.3 years than those without glucose intolerance (P=0.03), according to Ravi Retnakaran, MD, and Baiju R. Shah, MD, PhD, both of the University of Toronto. As expected, those found to have gestational diabetes had an even higher future cardiovascular risk compared with normoglycemic women (adjusted hazard ratio 1.66, P<0.001), the investigators reported online in the CMAJ. Both groups of women may benefit from closer cardiovascular surveillance, they wrote. Recent research by the same group showed that even mild degrees of glucose dysregulation in pregnancy strongly predict future diabetes risk. Since many scientists believe type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease arise from a "common soil," the researchers turned their attention to future cardiovascular risk. They used administrative and universal healthcare insurance databases in Ontario to look at outcomes for women ages 20 to 49 who gave birth from 1994 through 1998, excluding those with pregestational diabetes. In the course of standard obstetric care, Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Mild Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease: A Population-based Cohort Study

Mild Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease: A Population-based Cohort Study

Mild glucose intolerance in pregnancy and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based cohort study Ravi Retnakaran , MD and Baiju R. Shah , MD PhD From the Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital (Retnakaran); the Department of Medicine, University of Toronto (Retnakaran, Shah); the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (Shah); and the Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (Shah), Toronto, Ont Correspondence to: Dr. Baiju R. Shah, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto ON M4N 3M5; fax: 416 480-6048; [email protected] This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Pregnant women commonly receive screening for gestational diabetes mellitus by use of a 50 g glucose challenge test, followed by a diagnostic oral glucose tolerance test for those whose glucose challenge test result is abnormal. Although women with gestational diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it is not known whether mild glucose intolerance during pregnancy is also associated with cardiovascular disease. Thus, we sought to determine whether pregnant women with an abnormal glucose challenge test result but without gestational diabetes have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study that included all women in Ontario aged 2049 years with live deliveries between April 1994 and March 1998. We excluded women with pregestational diabetes. The population was stratified into 3 cohorts: women with gestational diabetes (n = 13 888); women who received an antepartum oral glucose tolerance test (suggestive of an abnormal result of the glucose challenge test) but who did not have gestational diabetes (n = 71 831); and women who did not receive an oral glucose tolerance test (suggestive of Continue reading >>

Risk Of Glucose Intolerance And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus In Relation To Maternal Habitual Snoring During Early Pregnancy

Risk Of Glucose Intolerance And Gestational Diabetes Mellitus In Relation To Maternal Habitual Snoring During Early Pregnancy

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Risk of glucose intolerance and gestational diabetes mellitus in relation to maternal habitual snoring during early pregnancy Affiliation Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America Roles Formal analysis, Software, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America Roles Formal analysis, Software, Visualization, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America Roles Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America Roles Investigation, Project administration, Supervision, Writing review & editing Affiliation Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America Roles Investigation, Project administration, Supervision, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Epidemiology, Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States of America Roles Investigation, Project administration, Supervision, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Center for Perinatal Studies, Swedish Medical Center, Seattle, Washington, United States of America Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy Associated With Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy Associated With Postpartum Cardiovascular Risk

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Glucose intolerance in pregnancy associated with postpartum cardiovascular risk Women who have gestational glucose intolerance (a condition less severe than gestational diabetes) exhibit multiple cardiovascular risk factors as early as three months after birth, according to a new study. Women who have gestational glucose intolerance (a condition less severe than gestational diabetes) exhibit multiple cardiovascular risk factors as early as three months after birth, according to a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Researchers in this study sought to evaluate the relationship between gestational glucose intolerance and postpartum risk of metabolic syndrome (defined as the clustering of several cardiometabolic risk factors including obesity, hypertension and low HDL cholesterol). Metabolic syndrome, like gestational diabetes itself, is associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Researchers followed 487 women who underwent oral glucose tolerance testing during pregnancy. Each subject was classified as either having normal glucose tolerance, gestational glucose intolerance or gestational diabetes. At three months postpartum, researchers evaluated each subject's cardiometabolic characteristics, such as blood pressure, weight, waist measurement and lipid levels. Findings support that even mild glucose intolerance during pregnancy predicts an increased likelihood of the metabolic syndrome at 3 months postpartum. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors as early as three months postpartum indicates that these risk factors may be longstanding and contribute to the long-ter Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy.

Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy.

I know that other helpful members have said this already, but I will too. Ask your doctor for a referral to see either a Registered Dietitian or a Certified Diabetes Educator in your area for menu planning. This health professional will help set up a plan for appropriate weekly weight gain for the remaining weeks of your pregnancy; but this eating plan will also include the correct amount of carbohydrates each day and these carbs will be distributed into meals and snacks correctly. Usually the dietitian will try to get you scheduled for an appointment in 1 week or so. Until this meeting, reset your SP program for weight maintenance; then the dietitian can adjust your calorie needs as necessary. Turn on your SP meal plans--for these are designed with a healthy amount of carbohydrates, fat and protein. And the food is distributed correctly into meals and snaks. Let me know if you need the steps to do this. You may also want to join our sister site: Your doctor should give you a list of mix-and-match foods, if you ask for one. Also consider joining Spark's sister site BabyFit. The nutrition advice given on SP isn't tailored for pregnant women, so you're safer using that site for the next few months. Since you have the added complication of diabetes, you want to be *really* careful and not enact any dietary changes that haven't been approved by a trusted professional. However, some things are fairly universal. Look at the macronutrients in the foods you eat and mix and match them until you create meals that satisfy all your needs. For most people, a good meal is made up of high-quality carbs, lean protein and some quality fats. This is true whether or not you have diabetes, but diabetics have to be particularly careful with portion sizes. Invest in a food scale and plenty Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy - Test, Treatment & Symptoms

Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy - Test, Treatment & Symptoms

Guide to Glucose Intolerance During Pregnancy Glucose intolerance during pregnancy is actually referred to as Gestational Diabetes. It is what women experience while they are pregnant whether they had prior diabetes issues or not. It is fairly common. For those that are not aware of what glucose intolerance means during pregnancy, well it's pretty much a sign of high blood sugars that starts or is initially found while you are pregnant. The cause of glucose intolerance during pregnancy is basically your pregnancy hormones which can at time block the hormone insulin from performing its duties. As a results, when this happens, glucose levels can increase in your blood. Not everyone is at risk, but here are some of the risk factors that may improve the chances of you developing gestational diabetes. If you are over the age of twenty-five or have a family history of diabetes you are at great risk. Also, if you have previously given birth to a baby that weighed 9lbs or more at birth, have high sugar levels in your urine, deal with high blood pressure, contain too much amniotic fluids or you yourself were overweight during or before pregnancy. In most cases, there are very mild or even no symptoms of glucose intolerance and tend not to be life threatening to women. Most women go through their pregnancy without even knowing they have gestational diabetes unless their doctors finds it during a test. Also, after birth the blood sugars levels of the mothers goes back to normal shortly. Symptoms of glucose intolerance may be found on our site using the left hand menu. Treatment of glucose intolerance during pregnancy revolves around the goal of keeping your blood sugar levels within the required limits for the duration of the pregnancy. This ensure that the baby is growing health Continue reading >>

How To Test For Glucose Intolerance

How To Test For Glucose Intolerance

Gestational diabetes represents a serious health risk to both mothers and babies, so early recognition is crucial. Noreen Dunnachie describes the correct way to administer the oral glucose intolerance test. Gestational diabetes represents a serious health risk to both mothers and babies, so early recognition is crucial. Noreen Dunnachie describes the correct way to administer the oral glucose intolerance test. The definition and, therefore, recognition and treatment of gestational diabetes have changed somewhat over the years (McCance et al, 2010). Current literature describes the condition as varying degrees of glucose/carbohydrate intolerance that is first diagnosed during pregnancy, usually resolving after birth. In addition, it is now noted that glucose intolerance in pregnancy may represent undiagnosed type 2 diabetes or, rarely, type 1 diabetes (Bothamley and Boyle, 2009). Since untreated gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) can increase the risks of fetal macrosomia, birth trauma to mother and baby, the need for induction of labour or CS, perinatal death, transient neonatal morbidity and even childhood obesity and diabetes (NICE, 2008), appropriate diagnosis and timely treatment are paramount. Although controversy remains around the most appropriate techniques for screening and diagnosing GDM, the benefit of using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is acknowledged by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) (2010), which recognises the significant relationship between maternal glucose levels and pregnancy outcomes. Since the majority of women with GDM are asymptomatic (Robson and Waugh, 2008), it is important to identify and recognise the risk factors as advised by both SIGN (2010) and NICE (2008), which include a booking BMI of greater than 30, Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test (GTT) diagnoses diabetes in pregnancy by checking how well your body regulates your blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, or GD, is a common pregnancy complication. It's thought to affect one pregnant woman in six. Although GD is common, testing for it is not routine. Your midwife will offer you the test only if she thinks there's a chance you could develop GD. Usually, you'll have the test when you’re between 24 weeks and 28 weeks pregnant. You could have the test earlier than this, usually at 16 weeks, depending on your medical history and where you live in the UK. For example, your midwife will offer the GTT sooner if you’ve had GD before. Why do I need a GTT? GD doesn’t often cause obvious symptoms, which is why testing is important. If GD isn’t recognised and treated it may put your health and your baby's health at risk. GD happens when your body fails to make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that keeps your blood sugar levels stable. It also helps your body to store sugar for when you need it later. During pregnancy, your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby’s needs, especially when he's growing rapidly. If your body can't make enough insulin, you may end up with too much sugar in your blood, resulting in GD. Having too much sugar in your blood may mean that your baby grows large. This increases your chances of having an induced labour, and a caesarean birth. GD, especially if it's not controlled, even raises the risk of a baby being stillborn. That's why it's so important to follow the advice of your midwife or doctor if you're diagnosed with GD. Am I at risk of developing GD? You’re more likely to develop GD if: Your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or above. You have previo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition in which a woman without diabetes develops high blood sugar levels during pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes generally results in few symptoms;[2] however, it does increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, depression, and requiring a Caesarean section.[2] Babies born to mothers with poorly treated gestational diabetes are at increased risk of being too large, having low blood sugar after birth, and jaundice.[2] If untreated, it can also result in a stillbirth.[2] Long term, children are at higher risk of being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes.[2] Gestational diabetes is caused by not enough insulin in the setting of insulin resistance.[2] Risk factors include being overweight, previously having gestational diabetes, a family history of type 2 diabetes, and having polycystic ovarian syndrome.[2] Diagnosis is by blood tests.[2] For those at normal risk screening is recommended between 24 and 28 weeks gestation.[2][3] For those at high risk testing may occur at the first prenatal visit.[2] Prevention is by maintaining a healthy weight and exercising before pregnancy.[2] Gestational diabetes is a treated with a diabetic diet, exercise, and possibly insulin injections.[2] Most women are able to manage their blood sugar with a diet and exercise.[3] Blood sugar testing among those who are affected is often recommended four times a day.[3] Breastfeeding is recommended as soon as possible after birth.[2] Gestational diabetes affects 3–9% of pregnancies, depending on the population studied.[3] It is especially common during the last three months of pregnancy.[2] It affects 1% of those under the age of 20 and 13% of those over the age of 44.[3] A number of ethnic groups including Asians, American Indians, Indigenous Australians, and Pacific Continue reading >>

Pgdc59 Biomarker Identifies Pregnancy-induced Glucose Intolerance

Pgdc59 Biomarker Identifies Pregnancy-induced Glucose Intolerance

pGDC59 Biomarker Identifies Pregnancy-Induced Glucose Intolerance pGDC59 Biomarker Identifies Pregnancy-Induced Glucose Intolerance One biomarker measurement during pregnancy can identify glucose intolerance with high sensitivity and specificity. HealthDay News One measurement of plasma glycated CD59 (pGCD59) in pregnancy can predict glucose intolerance, according to a study published online in Diabetes Care. Pamela Ghosh, PhD, from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues conducted a case-control study of 1,000 plasma samples from women receiving standard prenatal care. Five hundred women had a normal glucose challenge test (GCT) for screening of gestational diabetes (GDM), and 500 had a failed GCT and had a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test (control subjects and case patients, respectively). The researchers found that the median pGCD59 value was 8.5-fold higher in case patients and 10-fold higher in GDM patients compared with controls: 0.33, 2.79, and 3.23, respectively (P <.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92. The prevalence of large for gestational age (LGA) was 4.3% and 13.5^ in the lowest and highest quartiles of pGCD59, respectively. "One pGCD59 measurement during weeks 24 to 28 identifies pregnancy-induced glucose intolerance with high sensitivity and specificity and can potentially identify the risk for LGA," the authors write. Two authors disclosed a financial interest in Mellitus, which is developing diagnostic tools for diabetes. Continue reading >>

Mild Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy May Signal Future Cvd Risk

Mild Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy May Signal Future Cvd Risk

Mild Glucose Intolerance in Pregnancy May Signal Future CVD Risk August 24, 2009 (Toronto, Ontario) Mildly abnormal plasma glucose in pregnancy--below the threshold for gestational diabetes--may identify young women at greater risk for future CVD, a study suggests [1]. Pregnant women with mild glucose impairment had a 19% greater risk of CVD in 12 years of follow-up compared with women with normal glucose, in a large population-based study of women in Ontario. Gestational diabetes--diabetes that develops during pregnancy and goes away after delivery--was linked with a 66% increased risk of future CVD, which was expected, Dr Baiju R Shah (Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, ON) told heartwire . The study now extends the increased CVD risk to pregnant women with milder glucose abnormalities who might in the past have been told, "Don't worry about it, you're fine," Shah said. It suggests that "any glucose abnormalities in pregnancy are importantly linked with cardiovascular disease even in young women, and [clinicians] need to pay attention," he added. "Perhaps these women need more aggressive screening postpregnancy--for diabetes, cholesterol, and blood pressure," although further study is needed to confirm this, he said. The study is published online August 24, 2009 in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Since cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among Canadian women, it is important to identify predictors of vascular risk in this population, the authors write. Women with gestational diabetes are at increased risk for later type 2 diabetes and CVD, but new evidence suggests that even milder glucose impairment during pregnancy might predict future cardiac risk, Shah said. To test the hypothesis that the CVD risk associated with gest Continue reading >>

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

Diet For Prediabetes In Pregnancy

If you are pregnant you will likely be tested during your second trimester for a condition known as gestational diabetes, which is a form of diabetes that occurs only during pregnancy. However, the test may have borderline results. You may be labeled as prediabetic. Following a healthy diet is one way to prevent prediabetes from developing into diabetes, and also helps maintain the health of you and your baby. Video of the Day A label of prediabetes means someone you are "almost" diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, prediabetes is the state in which your blood glucose levels are higher than they should be, but are not consistently high enough to be labeled diabetic. The glucose tolerance test taken during your pregnancy involves drinking a sweet beverage and having blood tested for glucose levels after certain intervals of time. If you have borderline results you may be advised to change your diet to prevent a full case of gestational diabetes from forming. Managing blood sugar levels during pregnancy involves two things: watching what you eat, and watching how much you eat. Portion size is important, according to the American Diabetes Association. However, the types of foods you eat have an impact as well. If you have prediabetes you may need to limit the amount of carbohydrates you eat, and you should focus on foods that are high in nutrition and low in calories. While every woman’s needs are different based on height, weight and general activity level, following a general guideline can help you keep blood glucose levels in check. If you have gestational diabetes you should limit your starchy or sweet carbohydrates to only about half of your daily caloric intake, according to Medline Plus. Carbohydrates include such foods as fruits and vegetable Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Future Risk Of Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes

Glucose Intolerance In Pregnancy And Future Risk Of Pre-diabetes Or Diabetes

Glucose Intolerance in Pregnancy and Future Risk of Pre-Diabetes or Diabetes 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 4Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1Leadership Sinai Centre for Diabetes, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2Division of Endocrinology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 3Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 4Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada 5Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Corresponding author: Dr. Ravi Retnakaran, [email protected] Received 2008 May 28; Accepted 2008 Jun 25. Copyright 2008, American Diabetes Association Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. OBJECTIVEThe purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that any degree of abnormal glucose homeostasis detected on antepartum screening for gestat Continue reading >>

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