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Glucose Food Test Strips

Users Of Blood Glucose Meters Must Use Only The Test Strip Recommended For Use With Their Meter

Users Of Blood Glucose Meters Must Use Only The Test Strip Recommended For Use With Their Meter

Background:The US Food and Drug Administration, Abbott Diabetes Care, and LifeScan are aware of instances where incorrect results were obtained using LifeScan OneTouch® Ultra® test strips with Abbott Precision Xtra® meters. OneTouch® Ultra® test strips are not intended for use with Precision Xtra® meters, and doing so may lead to lower than expected blood glucose results. Similar problems can also occur if other brands and models of meters and strips are not used in proper combination. It is important for users to understand that if they use a test strip that is not recommended for their meter, the device may fail to give results or may generate inaccurate results. Recommendations:Users of blood glucose meters should carefully read the Owner’s Manual and only use the test strips that are specified for that meter. As an additional check, the test strip inserts identify the blood glucose meters with which they should be used. Healthcare providers and pharmacists should advise their patients to use only test strips that are compatible with their meter. Continue reading >>

Anatomy Of A Test Strip

Anatomy Of A Test Strip

Each tiny bit of plastic contains big technology Layers of Strip Science: Each test-strip brand has its own technology and design. Click HERE to download a PDF of a cross-section that shows the key parts of a sample strip. It's all too easy to overlook the humble test strip or balk at its price tag. But these stalwarts of diabetes care are more than mere pieces of plasticthey contain layer upon layer of cutting-edge science and engineering. The story of test strips is also a tale about how technology has made living with diabetes, and staying healthy, easier. Test strips have come a long way over the past few decades. When blood glucose testing first made its way from the clinic into homes in the 1980s, the technology behind strips was fundamentally different from today. Early test strips measured blood glucose by using an enzyme to convert the glucose in a drop of blood into a proportional amount of dye. The meter measured the amount of dye by shining a beam of light on the test spot and detecting how much of the light was absorbed by the dye. The process worked, but it was tedious. "These meters were difficult to operate," says Selly Saini, the worldwide director of strip products for Johnson & Johnson, who has been developing test strips for 25 years. "There were lots of steps involved. It took a lot of blood and was time consuming." Test strips underwent a dramatic change in the late '80s and early '90s when they began to feature electrochemistry, the science of turning chemical reactions into electricity. "The breakthrough was getting enzymes to create an electrochemical signal when exposed to blood," says Saini. Electrochemical test strips, the world standard today, also employ enzymes, but instead of making dye, they convert glucose into an electrical current. T Continue reading >>

Eat To Your Meter

Eat To Your Meter

Tweet Eat to your meter is a phrase used to describe the use of systematic blood glucose testing to inform the dietary choice of appropriate foods and quantities of foods for good diabetes control. Using the ‘eat to your meter’ system is of particular use to people with type 2 diabetes. If you are on insulin, the principles of eating to your meter can be applied but you must take care not to increase your risk of hypos. How to eat to your meter To get started, you will need: Take the following steps: Test your blood glucose before a meal and record the result Have your meal and record what you ate Test your blood glucose levels 2 hours after having started your meal and record the result Test your blood glucose levels 4 hours after having started your meal and record the result Also note down any other factor that may affect your blood glucose levels, this could include any activity carried out earlier in the day or after eating or any periods of stress or illness. Making sense of the results The aims of eating to your meter is in identifying the foods or meals that lead to a larger rise in your blood sugar levels after eating and the foods and meals that lead to a smaller rise after eating. This helps you to tailor your diet towards the foods that help you to meet the guideline blood glucose targets. If a meal causes a large rise in blood glucose levels at the 2 hour mark, you may wish or need to either remove this meal from your regular diet or look to reduce the size of the portion you had of it. Note that it is the rise in your sugar levels you are looking for. To find the rise, take your result 2 hours after eating and subtract from this your before meal reading. Similarly, it is also worth looking at difference between the result 4 hours after eating and your Continue reading >>

How To Read The Results Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

How To Read The Results Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

1 Review the digital screen on the test meter after you’ve added a drop of blood to the test strip. After analyzing the blood, the meter will automatically display the blood glucose result -- it's as simple as that. 2 Compare the displayed number with your blood sugar guidelines. The American Diabetes Association recommends that a person’s blood sugar ranges from 70 to 130 before a meal or less than 180 after a meal. However, your doctor might provide a more individualized range based on your lifestyle and health status. 3 Consult your instruction manual if an error displays on the screen. Error codes and symbols differ from one meter to the next. You might see an error if you improperly inserted the test strips or dropped too much or too little blood onto the test strip. Continue reading >>

How To Test Foods For Sugars

How To Test Foods For Sugars

A lot of foods contain sugar whether it they are carbohydrates which are made from sugars, or whether they are tinned foods which contain a lot of added sugar in order to preserve them. Almost everything contains sugar to some extent and it is very hard to avoid getting it in your diet. Of course this isn't entirely a bad thing – the body needs a certain amount of sugar in order to run healthily and that is where it gets its energy from in order run the brain, to boost our immune system, and to enable us to move around and do all those things that exert energy. However at the same time this makes it all too easy for us to overdose on sugar and to get more than we should in our diet, and this is particularly a problem for those who need to control their sugar intake more closely – such as those on diets or those who suffer from diabetes. Sugar in too high quantities for anyone can actually cause diabetes, and it can also give us a sugar high that leaves us exhausted straight after. It can make children hyper, it causes weight gain and it damages our teeth – all of which means it's important to control your intake. Fortunately there are ways to control the sugar in your diet and to test for sugar in food. Of course one easy way to do this is to look on the back of labels and these should give you some indication as to the amount of sugar in the item. However if you're unsure then you can also conduct your own tests to find out how much sugar content is in your food. To do this you will need glucose test strips, and these will help you to get a more accurate reading relatively quickly of any food item. How to Use Glucose Test Strips • First of all, fill a cup up with water and mark it 'negative control'. • Now make seven different labels and mark these on 7 more Continue reading >>

How Sweet It Is! Measuring Glucose In Your Food

How Sweet It Is! Measuring Glucose In Your Food

Difficulty Time Required Average (6-10 days) Prerequisites None Material Availability A Sugar Metabolism Kit containing most of the specialty supplies needed for this project is available from our partner Home Science Tools. Cost Average ($40 - $80) Safety No issues Abstract You know that sugar makes food sweet, but did you know that there are different kinds of sugar? Sucrose is the granulated sugar that you usually use for baking. Another kind of sugar, which is found in honey and in many fruits, is glucose. In this science project, you will measure the concentration of glucose in a variety of foods. You will use special test strips that change color in response to glucose to measure the glucose concentration in different foods. Objective To measure the concentration of glucose in a variety of common fruits and juices. Credits David Whyte, PhD, Science Buddies Cite This Page MLA Style Science Buddies Staff. "How Sweet It Is! Measuring Glucose in Your Food" Science Buddies. Science Buddies, 16 Oct. 2017. Web. 30 Dec. 2017 Continue reading >>

Is My Diet Soda Really Sugar-free? Check Its Sugar!

Is My Diet Soda Really Sugar-free? Check Its Sugar!

back to Overview You ordered Diet Coke but is that what arrived? It tastes ... funny. But you're not sure. Do your lips feel sticky? Or is that your imagination? Sugar-free or sugar-bomb? Sometimes it’s hard to tell! Living with diabetes, the difference between the Diet Coke we ordered and the regular Coke we’re served isn’t just a few extra calories. It can mean smooth sailing with our blood sugars or a day spent struggling to recover from the mix-up. Most of the time I can tell the difference between the two, but sometimes the mix is so awful that I just don’t know. Has it ever happened to you? Have you ever had a drink that you suspected might not be diet, but just weren’t sure? The little things we try Being a victim of the Diet Coke order gone wrong, a.k.a “The Sugar Bomb,” is a hard lesson to swallow. So I’ve built safety checks into my drink orders, and sometimes they help. Some examples: I always take a sip of my Diet Coke before pulling away from the drive-thru window (if it’s not diet or if it tastes weird, I still have time to ask them about it). Whenever possible I try to watch the server or attendant fill my drink cup, to make sure it’s positioned under the proper fountain nozzle. This one is hard, though, because perspective and angles can make it really difficult to tell. I annunciate like crazy. “I’d like a large DIIIIIIIIIIIIIIEEEEEEEEEEETTTTTT Coke, please.” And there’s nothing like being at a place where I can fill my own drink. Plus, unlimited refills? Yes, please! The awkward ask There are times, though, when it’s not possible to avoid a conversation with the server or employee. I hate being a high-maintenance patron – but not as much as I hate going thirsty or running high blood sugars. So I politely ask them to doub Continue reading >>

Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strip Lawsuit

Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strip Lawsuit

Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strip Lawsuit Nova Diabetes Care and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have recalled about 62 million Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips because they can show incorrect, abnormally high blood-sugar readings. People with diabetes who use the strips are at risk of severe, life-threatening insulin dosing errors. What You Can Do & How a Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strip Lawsuit Can Help The Schmidt Firm, PLLC is currently accepting defective blood-sugar test strip induced injury cases in all 50 states. If you or somebody you know was injured by the recalled Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips, you should contact our lawyers immediately for a free case consultation. Please use the form below to contact our Defective Medical Device Litigation Group or call us toll-free 24 hours a day at (866) 920-0753. UPDATE: Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips Recalled The FDA has announced a Class 1 recall of 21 lots of Nova Max Blood Glucose Test Strips . The test strips were manufactured from December 2011 until April 2013 and sold in stores, online, and in hospitals. The FDA believes that the products were contaminated with a chemical during manufacturing. Approximately 62 million of the following blood-sugar test strips were recalled: FDA Safety Warning for Defective Blood Sugar Test Strips The FDA stated the following reason for the test-strip recall: The test strips under recall may report a false, abnormally high blood glucose result. Under certain conditions, a false, abnormally high blood glucose level could result in an insulin dosing error, requiring the user to seek immediate medical attention. Nova Diabetes Care announced a Nova Max Glucose Test Strip Recall on July 26, 2013. They recommended that customers who use, distribute, or sell the Continue reading >>

How To Test Foods For Sugars

How To Test Foods For Sugars

The precise amount of sugar in food can be determined from the nutrition fact label found on packaged food or from USDA food charts. However, you can also determine the amount of sugar in foods by performing an easy science experiment. Doctors use glucose test strips to screen patients for diabetes. The test strip changes color to indicate the presence and amount of glucose in a liquid, typically urine. By mixing food and water, you can use the resulting liquid and a test strip to test a food for sugar, according to Science Buddies. Video of the Day Choose a food item that has a light-colored juice. Dark-colored juice will make it difficult to see the color change in the test strip. For example, apricots would be a better choice than blueberries. Place a glucose test strip on a piece of white paper towel. The paper towel provides a neutral background to view the color change as well as being able to blot excess liquid. Mash 1 tsp. of the test food in the bowl along with 1 tsp. of water. Mash the food completely using a fork. If the food absorbs all of the water, add an additional 1 tsp. of water. Pour the test liquid through a coffee filter to filter out any food particles. If you are testing a fruit juice without pulp, omit this step. Draw up some of the test liquid using the medicine dropper. Add 2 drops of the liquid to the test spot on the glucose test strip. The test spot will be a raised white square. Do not add too much liquid or the test spot may dissolve. Wait 30 seconds before reading the test strip. Compare the resulting color to the color chart on the side of the test strip bottle. The exact color change will depend on the type and brand of urine test strip. One common brand, for example, will change from blue for zero glucose through to olive green for 500 Continue reading >>

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

7 Blood Sugar Testing Mistakes To Avoid

1 / 8 Understand Diabetes Testing If you have diabetes, it's imperative that you learn to effectively self-test your blood sugar to keep your glucose levels in check. For example, results from a study of more than 5,000 people living with diabetes showed that even those people who don't take medication for diabetes have better blood sugar control if they test regularly. The study participants' risk of early kidney damage, strokes, and death from diabetes-related causes was also reduced by one-third. Of course, the accuracy of your results is tied to the accuracy of your checking — and to your understanding of what all the numbers mean. "The most important point to me is that people are learning something from checking their blood sugar," says Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition for the American Diabetes Association. "Don't just look at those numbers, write them down, and move on. If you have diabetes, take an active role in your health." To get the most useful readings, learn these common blood sugar testing mistakes and how to avoid them. Continue reading >>

Testing Glucose Levels

Testing Glucose Levels

Grade Level: 6th – 8th; Type: Chemistry Objective: Determine which foods and drinks contain the most glucose. This can be helpful for people with diabetes so that they know which foods to eat when they experience low blood sugar symptoms. Download Project Add to Collection Which foods contain the most glucose? Which foods are best for a diabetic to eat or drink when her blood sugar is too low? When people with diabetes experience low blood sugar symptoms, they are supposed to eat something high in glucose (a type of sugar) right away. But which foods are high in glucose? This science experiment lets you figure out the answer. Materials: Eight different foods Scale (e.g., triple beam balance from your school science lab) Cup Water Glucose test strip (e.g., Diastix) Stopwatch, or watch with a second hand Glucose tablet Experimental Procedure Choose eight different foods and drinks to test for glucose. For example, you might decide to test orange juice, an apple, honey, lemon juice, a tomato, soda, ketchup, and sugar water. Use a triple beam balance or other scale to make sure that you have exactly 5 grams of each food or drink. Set the small portions of food and drink out on the table. Make a hypothesis about which foods you think will be highest in glucose and which will contain the least amount of glucose. Record your hypotheses in the chart below. Create a negative control by dipping a test strip into a cup of tap water. Wait thirty seconds, and observe the test strip. There should be no change. Create a positive control by dipping a test strip into a glucose solution. Make this solution by adding a glucose pill to a cup of water that has a mass of 5 grams. Test each of the liquids using a different test strip. Do this by simply dipping the test strip into the liquid Continue reading >>

Printed Materials For Blood Glucose Test Strips

Printed Materials For Blood Glucose Test Strips

DuPont printed materials for blood glucose test strips align with the world’s most stringent accuracy standards, meeting the needs of patients and biomedical manufacturers worldwide. DuPont supplies leading biomedical manufacturers around the globe with functional electrode inks for enzyme-based amperometric glucose blood concentration measurement. Both biomedical manufacturers and patients depend on DuPont’s strict adherence to quality, consistency, accuracy and stable performance, which guarantees traceable quality control, high-volume product consistency, and well-defined electrochemical activity. These elements, in combination with DuPont’s comprehensive application support, ensure the successful implementation of advanced enzyme blood measurement systems. Continue reading >>

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tips for cutting costs of blood glucose test strips Answers from Peggy Moreland, R.N., C.D.E. In the U.S., you can try these tips to reduce the cost of test strips: Check with insurance or Medicare. Your insurance or Medicare will help to cover the cost of test strips if you have a prescription. Check with them, they may have a contract with a different meter company and you may be paying more than you have to for your test strips. Check with your blood glucose meter company. Many companies have programs or discount cards to help with the cost of testing supplies. The number should be on the back of your meter. Ask your store. Some chains have non-branded meters and testing supplies at a lower cost than branded meters. Patient assistance and outreach programs. Ask your health care provider about resources that may be available to you. Moreland P (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 8, 2018. Your Medicare coverage: Blood sugar (glucose) test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Tsai A. 4 ways to save on test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Everything you need to know about diabetes test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Test Strips

Blood Glucose Test Strips

Another Shared Diabetic Supply Harboring Bacterial Contamination Author: Sharon Geaghan, MD // Date: JAN.1.2018 // Source: Clinical Laboratory News When you or a family member are admitted to the hospital, you expect that the room will be cleaned and disinfected thoroughly. You do not expect to find half-used tissue paper boxes or leftover bandages from the previous patient. To the contrary, patients expect that hospitals will take all necessary precautions to avoid spreading disease, including disposing of patients medications when they are discharged from a facility. Perhaps the only exception to the current practice of single-use, single-patient hospital supplies is blood glucose test strips. Hospitals and other institutions often procure blood glucose test strips in 25- or 50-count vials and bring them from patient to patient and room to room for testing purposes. Testing sites range from acute care hospitals, outpatient clinics, skilled nursing facilities and long term care facilities to prisons, shelters, surgery centers, schools, and camps. Regardless of testing site, this practice of multi-strip vial use has come into focus as yet another potential source of contamination for patients undergoing blood glucose testing, along with the well-documented risks of sharing blood glucose meters and capillary puncture devices (1). CDC and FDA Guidance on Shared Diabetic Supplies The position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on shared diabetic supplies is clear: Unused supplies such as blood glucose test strips taken to a patients bedside should not be used for another patient because of possible inadvertent contamination (2). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates these test strips as medical devices. In the home testing market, FDA advises con Continue reading >>

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