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Glucose Challenge Test

Relationship Between 1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Results And Perinatal Outcomes

Relationship Between 1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Results And Perinatal Outcomes

Go to: Abstract To estimate the relationship between 1-hour 50 gm glucose challenge test (GCT) values and perinatal outcomes. Methods This was a secondary analysis of data from a multicenter treatment trial of mild gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women with GCT 135199 mg/dL completed a 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Mild GDM was defined as fasting glucose less than 95 mg/dL and two or more abnormal OGTT values: 1-hour 180 mg/dL or more; 2-hour 155 mg/dL or more; 3-hour 140 mg/dL or more. Our study included untreated women with GCT 135–139 mg/dL, GCT 140–199 mg/dL, and a comparison group with GCT less than 120 mg/dL. Primary outcomes included a perinatal composite (stillbirth, neonatal death, hypoglycemia, hyperbilirubinemia, neonatal hyperinsulinemia, and birth trauma), large for gestational age (LGA, birth weight above the 90th percentile based on gender and race specific norms) and macrosomia (greater than 4,000gm). There were 436 women with GCT less than120 mg/dL and 1,403 with GCT 135 mg/dL or more (GCT 135–139, n=135; 140–199, n=1,268). The composite perinatal outcome occurred in 25.6% of those with GCT less than 120 mg/dL compared with 21.1% for GCT 135–139 mg/dL, and 35.3% for GCT 140–199 mg/dL. Rates of LGA by group were 6.6%, 6.8% and 12.4%, respectively. Rates of macrosomia by group were 7.8%, 6.1% and 12.1%, respectively. Compared with GCT less than 120 mg/dL, the adjusted odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) for GCT values of 140–199 mg/dL were 1.48 (1.14–1.93) for the composite outcome, 1.97 (1.29–3.11) for LGA, and 1.61(1.07–2.49) for macrosomia. For GCT values 135–139 mg/dL, adjusted ORs and 95% CIs were 0.75 (0.45–1.21), 1.04 (0.44–2.24) and 0.75 (0.30–1.66), respectively. The subcategories with GC Continue reading >>

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

If you have PCOS and you’re getting ready to have an oral glucose tolerance test, you may be wondering how to prepare for the test and what the results may mean. The test can help your health care provider figure out whether you have a high risk of developing diabetes and whether lifestyle changes and medications such as Metformin might be helpful in treating your PCOS. What is Glucose? Glucose is a type of sugar and the main source of energy used by your body. The glucose that your body uses for energy comes from many kinds of foods called carbohydrates, such as cereal, bread, rice, pasta, and other grains, not just sugary foods. Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables all contain carbohydrates as well. Your body uses the glucose it needs and then stores the rest as “glycogen” in your liver and muscles. What is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)? An OGTT is a way to measure your body’s ability to use glucose. Your pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) makes a hormone called insulin, which helps your body use the glucose in your blood. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or if your body is unable to use the insulin it makes, you may have a high blood glucose level. The OGTT involves fasting overnight and then having your blood checked early in the morning. You will then drink a special glucose drink and have your blood tested again after 2 hours. Sometimes blood sugar levels are also checked at other times such as 1 hour, 3 hours, or 4 hours after the glucose drink. What if my blood glucose level is high? If the OGTT shows that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your health care provider may tell you that you have “impaired glucose tolerance”. This often means that you are at risk for developing diabetes. Rarely, diabetes Continue reading >>

1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Or Gct (plasma, Serum) During Pregnancy

1-hour Glucose Challenge Test Or Gct (plasma, Serum) During Pregnancy

What is the 1-Hour Glucose Challenge Test GCT? The 1-hour glucose challenge test or GCT measures the effect of a glucose solution on blood glucose levels. Patients are brought into the lab where one blood sample is taken 1-hour after a glucose solution is consumed. The glucose solution typically contains 50 grams of glucose but may also contain 75 or 100 grams. The 1-hour glucose challenge test is a screening test done to identify who may be at risk of diabetes. It does not usually diagnose diabetes but done to identify those who require additional testing. Pregnant women take the 1-hour glucose tolerance test as a screening tool for gestational diabetes. If the test results are below 130 mg/dl (or below 140 mg/dl) then no additional testing is required. If the test is above 130 mg (135 or 140 mg) then a 3-hour glucose tolerance test or GTT is ordered. The 3-hour glucose tolerance test uses a 100 gram glucose solution. If non-fasting glucose levels are greater than 126 mg/dL or normal daily glucose levels are greater than 200 mg/dL, glucose tolerance testing is not necessary as these measurements indicate diabetes. Normal Value Range Adult Non-Pregnant and Pregnant: Below 130 to 140 mg/dL or 7.2 to 7.8 mmol/L < Laboratory Values During Pregnancy Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

Challenging The Glucose Challenge Test

Challenging The Glucose Challenge Test

Huynh, Jenny; Ratnaike, Sujiva; Bartalotta, Catherine; Permezel, Michael; Houlihan, Christine The occurrence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy is associated with adverse outcomes for both the baby and the mother. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is the gold standard for widespread diagnostic screening of GDM. A number of options for initial screening tests (assessing the need for OGTT) have been investigated with the goal of reducing the numbers of patients undergoing an OGTT. Any universal screening protocol needs to consider the risk of missing the diagnosis, patient comfort, and laboratory costs. Currently, the Australian Diabetes in Pregnancy Society (ADIPS) recommends initial screening for GDM with the glucose challenge test (GCT). Other groups have suggested that fasting plasma glucose (FPG) should be used as the initial screening test. Recently, the International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Group (IADPSG) recommended use of new diagnostic criteria for GDM using a one-step OGTT. This retrospective study was designed to determine the number of patients with GDM who would be missed with the use of GCT/OGTT or FPG/OGTT compared with patients having OGTT alone without an initial screening, and also to assess the performance of GCT for diagnosis of GDM using the new IADPSG criteria. A search of the Austin Pathology database was conducted between 2005 and 2007, and it identified 8486 episodes of GCT and OGTT (2291 GCT only, 416 GCT, then OGTT and 5473 OGTT alone). Test characteristics were assessed for simulated GCT/OGTT (where the 1-hour OGTT value was considered equivalent to the 1-hour GCT value) and for simulated FPG/OGTT (which investigated different FPG values to indicate need for OGTT). With the OGTT one-step procedure Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Why do I need a glucose screening test during pregnancy? Most healthcare practitioners routinely recommend a glucose screening test (also called a glucose challenge test or GCT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to check for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a high blood sugar condition that some women get during pregnancy. Between 2 and 5 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, making it one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. And because the condition rarely causes any symptoms, testing is the only way to find out whether you have it. Like any screening test, the GCT won't give you a diagnosis. Instead, it's designed to identify as many women as possible who may have a problem and need more testing to find out. So a positive result doesn't mean that you have gestational diabetes. In fact, only about a third of women who test positive on the glucose screen actually have the condition. If you test positive on the screening, you'll need to take the glucose tolerance test (GTT) – a longer, more definitive test that tells you for sure whether you have gestational diabetes. Your practitioner may want you to be screened earlier than 24 weeks if a routine urine test shows a lot of sugar in your urine or if you're considered high risk. If the results are normal, you'll be screened again at 24 to 28 weeks. Of course, if you were diagnosed with diabetes before pregnancy, you won't need to be screened. Instead, you'll continue to work with your practitioner to manage your condition during pregnancy. How is the glucose screening test done? When you arrive for the test, you're given a sugar solution that contains 50 grams of glucose. The stuff tastes like a very sweet soda pop (it comes in cola, orange, or lime flavor), and you have to Continue reading >>

Reference Values During Pregnancy

Reference Values During Pregnancy

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Single Glucose Challenge Test Procedure For Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Jammu Cohort Study.

Single Glucose Challenge Test Procedure For Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Jammu Cohort Study.

Single glucose challenge test procedure for diagnosis of gestational diabetes mellitus: a Jammu cohort study. To elucidate an evidence based Single Glucose Challenge test to diagnose Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM). This study included 500 pregnant women in 16-32 weeks of gestation. They underwent 75g Oral Glucose Challenge test irrespective of the last meal timing and 2 hr venous blood was drawn. After 3 days they underwent 75g OGTT in the fasting state and their 2 hr blood was drawn. Plasma glucose was estimated in both samples by GOD-POD method. GDM was diagnosed with 2hr Plasma glucose (PG) > or = 7.8 mmol/l (> or = 140 mg/dl) based on WHO criteria. The data was analysed by computer software Microsoft excel for windows and epi-info version 6.0, CDC, Atlanta, GA. Among 500 women, 55(11%) were diagnosed as GDM by WHO criteria. It was observed that there was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) between 2 hr PG of GCT and 2 hr PG of WHO recommended method. This Single Glucose Challenge test procedure is cost-effective, evidence based and patient friendly approach to diagnosis Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Continue reading >>

Rcpa - Glucose Challenge Test

Rcpa - Glucose Challenge Test

The non-fasting patient drinks 50 g (or 75 g) glucose in a flavoured drink over ten minutes. One hour after commencing the drink, a specimen of blood is taken for plasma glucose. The preferred specimen is 5 mL blood in a fluoride oxalate tube. Collection in plain or lithium heparin tubes is satisfactory if the specimen is delivered promptly to the laboratory. All pregnant women should be screened for gestational diabetes at 26-28 weeks. Patients at high risk for gestational diabetes (eg, previous large baby) should have a formal glucose tolerance test, rather than a glucose challenge test. A level of 7.8 mmol/L (or 8.0 mmol/L for 75g) has been suggested for Australia. Patients with a glucose of 7.8 mmol/L or more (or 8.0 mmol/L for 75 g) should undergo formal glucose tolerance testing. To identify the women most at risk of developing gestational Diabetes mellitus. If absorption of glucose from the gut is normal, women with a level below the cutoff have a low risk of gestational diabetes; whereas those at or above the cutoff are at higher risk, and should have an oral glucose tolerance test for definitive diagnosis. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

The glucose tolerance test is a medical test in which glucose is given and blood samples taken afterward to determine how quickly it is cleared from the blood.[1] The test is usually used to test for diabetes, insulin resistance, impaired beta cell function,[2] and sometimes reactive hypoglycemia and acromegaly, or rarer disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. In the most commonly performed version of the test, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a standard dose of glucose is ingested by mouth and blood levels are checked two hours later.[3] Many variations of the GTT have been devised over the years for various purposes, with different standard doses of glucose, different routes of administration, different intervals and durations of sampling, and various substances measured in addition to blood glucose. History[edit] The glucose tolerance test was first described in 1923 by Jerome W. Conn.[4] The test was based on the previous work in 1913 by A. T. B. Jacobson in determining that carbohydrate ingestion results in blood glucose fluctuations,[5] and the premise (named the Staub-Traugott Phenomenon after its first observers H. Staub in 1921 and K. Traugott in 1922) that a normal patient fed glucose will rapidly return to normal levels of blood glucose after an initial spike, and will see improved reaction to subsequent glucose feedings.[6][7] Testing[edit] Since the 1970s, the World Health Organization and other organizations interested in diabetes agreed on a standard dose and duration. Preparation[edit] The patient is instructed not to restrict carbohydrate intake in the days or weeks before the test.[citation needed] The test should not be done during an illness, as results may not reflect the patient's glucose metabolism when healthy. A full adult dose should not be Continue reading >>

The One Hour Glucose Screening (glucose Challenge Test)

The One Hour Glucose Screening (glucose Challenge Test)

This test is also commonly referred to as Kolodex, or Glucola testing. This is a screening test for gestational diabetes, a blood test done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. The mother is given a sugar drink (Kolodex or Glucola are the name brands) and blood is taken one hour later. If the test is normal and you don't have other risk factors then no further testing is usually needed. If the screening test is abnormal, then a more prolonged test is needed to rule out gestational diabetes. Why it's important: Like any screening test, this one won't give you a diagnosis mdash it's designed to identify as many women as possible who may have a problem and need more testing to find out. So a positive result doesn't mean that you have gestational diabetes. In fact, only about a third of women who test positive on the glucose screen actually have the condition. To find out if you're one of them, you'll have to undergo a longer, more definitive exam called a glucose tolerance test (GTT). Between 2 and 5 percent of expectant mothers develop gestational diabetes, making it one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. And because the condition rarely causes any symptoms, testing is the only way to find out if you have it. For more information, see Diabetes in Pregnancy. Your practitioner may want you to be screened earlier than 24 weeks if a routine urine test shows a high amount of sugar in the urine or if you're considered at high risk. If the results are normal, you'll be screened again at 24 to 28 weeks. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test - Non-pregnant

Glucose Tolerance Test - Non-pregnant

The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then be asked to drink a liquid containing a certain amount of glucose (usually 75 grams). Your blood will be taken again every 30 to 60 minutes after you drink the solution. The test may take up to 3 hours. A similar test is the intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance test (IGTT). It is rarely used, and is never used to diagnose diabetes. In one version of the IGTT, glucose is injected into your vein for 3 minutes. Blood insulin levels are measured before the injection, and again at 1 and 3 minutes after the injection. The timing may vary. This IGTT is almost always used for research purposes only. Continue reading >>

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

All You Need To Know About The Glucose Tolerance Test

Most of the food people eat is turned directly into glucose when digested, and the body uses it as energy. The pancreas is responsible for making the hormone insulin which helps to get glucose into the cells of the body. Diabetes is a long-term disease that occurs due to the pancreas not producing enough insulin or the body being unable to use the insulin it produces effectively. The body is unable to process food properly to use for energy. Glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to severe health problems. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and is also known as juvenile diabetes. With type 1 diabetes the body does not produce insulin. According to The American Diabetes Association, only 5 percent of people with diabetes have type 1. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. In people with type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin properly, which is known as insulin resistance. The pancreas responds by making more insulin to cover the deficiency but is not able to keep blood glucose at normal levels. As glucose builds up in the blood, the body's cells do not receive the energy they need. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Glucose tolerance test: Testing for diabetes A simple blood test can often detect diabetes. If the test produces borderline results, a glucose tolerance test may help with the final diagnosis. In a healthy person, glucose levels will rise after eating a meal and return to normal once the glucose is used or stored by the body. A glucose tolerance test can help to work out the difference between normal glucose levels and the levels seen in diabetes and prediabetes. The glucose tolerance test is used to measure t Continue reading >>

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