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Glucose-ascorbate-antagonism

What Makes Us Sick?

What Makes Us Sick?

Common Lifestyle Choices That Cripple Our Immune System There are many common things people do in our society that cripple the immune system and make us more susceptible to illness. When people get sick, they often act as though they are a poor victim of a vicious assault by a pathogen. What they dont realize is that their lifestyle provided the proper environment for the pathogen to do what it was created to do. The job of any pathogen is to break down decaying matter. Our job is to avoid being decaying matter by keeping our bodies functioning and adapting at their peak potential. Here are five major choices that promote illness: When we consume sugar it feeds parasites within our bodies and depletes our system of critical immune boosting nutrients such as vitamin C, glutathione, zinc, etc. Sugar also feeds the development of abnormal tissue and cancerous growth. When sugar and starch is metabolized in our body it breaks down into a simple molecule called glucose that is used for energy production. In the 1970s, Dr. John Ely discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory. Glucose and vitamin C (ascorbate) have a very similar chemical makeup. This theory proposes that elevated glucose levels compete and effectively restrict vitamin C from entering cells. Both glucose and vitamin C depend upon the pancreatic hormone insulin and its signaling effects in order to get into cells. There is an important receptor called the Glut-1 receptor that activates in response to insulin to allow both glucose and vitamin C to enter the cell. However, glucose has a greater affinity for the insulin receptor. This means that the greater the content of circulating blood sugar the less vitamin C will enter the cell. White blood cells have more insulin pumps than any other type of c Continue reading >>

Fruit And Vitamin C - Page 3

Fruit And Vitamin C - Page 3

Limes last better in the fridge (I keep them in the crisper) than lemons. For lemons, we store them in stainless-steel box. You can also smear a drop of oil around the lemons to last a bit longer. Thanks, Prickly. I didn't know that and will try it. Lynn, I wonder if the high doses of Vitamin C are causing high BGs. Just a thought. I found this info: "Vitamin C may affect blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in people with diabetes or hypoglycemia, and in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary." I googled "vitamin C and high blood sugar" and there are a lot of sites that say Vitamin C may raise BG. You might try to eliminate or reduce your Vitamin C and see if it lowers your BGs. Just a suggestion. For every article that say Vit. C raises BG, there's another one that says it lowers it. Then there is the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory, which basically says the the higher your BG, the MORE Vit. C you need because they compete to get into the cells. So I don't know. Stopping vit. C is one of the many experiments I've tried over the years, with no change at all in my BG. I've stopped every supplement individually, stopped all supplements, taken large doses of lots of things, specific combinations of supplements...with no effect on BG. But I do feel better taking some of them. I realize it's almost a religious zeal, but I'm a strong believer in antioxidants, and Vit. C in particular...I believe it's antioxidants that have gotten me to 58 years old with, except for high BG, good health....and I think they are keeping the high BG from causing damage (the major damage from high BG is oxida Continue reading >>

5 Lifestyle Activities That Cripple Our Immune System

5 Lifestyle Activities That Cripple Our Immune System

5 Lifestyle Activities that Cripple Our Immune System Activities that Cripple Our Immune System: The human immune system is under constant attack by the forces of nature. To compound this, there are many common things people do in our society that cripple the immune system and make us more susceptible to illness. People often act as though they are a poor victim of a vicious assault by a pathogen when they get sick. What they dont often realize is that their lifestyle provided the proper environment for the pathogen to do what it was created to do. The job of any pathogen is to break down decaying matter. Our job must be to not be decaying matter, by keeping our bodies functioning and adapting at their peak potential. Our responsibility to ourselves is to use our lifestyle to strengthen our immune system so we can overcome the stressors of life.Here are five major things most individuals in our society do to promote illness. Consuming sugar feeds parasites within our body and depletes our system of critical immune boosting nutrients such as vitamin C, glutathione, zinc, etc ( 1 ). Sugar also feeds the development of abnormal tissue and cancerous growth ( 2 ). When sugar and starch is metabolized in our body it breaks down into a simple molecule called glucose that is used for energy production. In the 1970s, Dr. John Ely discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory ( 3 ). Glucose and vitamin C (ascorbate) have a very similar chemical makeup. This theory proposes that elevated glucose levels compete and effectively restrict vitamin C from entering cells. Both glucose and vitamin C depend upon the pancreatic hormone insulin and its signaling effects in order to get into cells. There is an important receptor called the Glut-1 receptor that activates in respons Continue reading >>

Nutritionist | Vancouver | Tahlia Sage

Nutritionist | Vancouver | Tahlia Sage

Todays post is especially applicable because the holiday is a challenging time for you to make healthy choices. Sugary treats are must haves during the holiday season. Just to name a few of my favourites: ginger bread men, apple pie, pumpkin pie, and hot chocolate. The last thing we want is getting sick by the end of the holiday season and feeling our favourite outfits getting tighter. Today I want to show you why sugar can dampen your immune system and give you some of my favourite ways to take care of my sweet tooth without depriving myself from all the things I love. By the way, this is also the second installment of immune boosting tips. Click here to read the previous post. Without delving into the science right away, Im sure your observant eyes already spot the similarity between these two molecules. Vitamin C and glucose (sugar) molecules are structurally similar. And scientists agree with you. Sugar competes with vitamin C absorption because of this similarity (Dr. John Ely 1970 Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism Theory). Vitamin C is a natural anti-inflammatory. It helps us get over colds and infections faster because it protects our white blood cell from the oxidative damage caused by fighting pathogens and bacteria in the body. Theres a greater need for vitamin C when our body is expose to stress and pathogens. When our bodys ability to absorb vitamin C is blocked by sugar, our immune system is dampened as well. Sugar also makes our body lose minerals magnesium and chromium. These 2 minerals are essential for regulating blood sugar and keeping sugar craving under control (Journal of Lab and Clinc Med). Hope these 2 tips can help you stay on track this holiday season. A big part is having the support you need and willing to take the first step to take care of yours Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Vs. Sugar: A Battle Royal

Vitamin C Vs. Sugar: A Battle Royal

At the first hintof a cold coming on a quick reaction might be to buy a carton of OJ and start downing it. Or to get an immunity boosting smoothie. Why? Vitamin C, of course. We all know that vitamin C is essential for proper immune function . But did you know that vitamin C is derived from glucose in most non-human animals, so sugar and vitamin C are very similar in structure? Because due to their similarity in structure vitamin C and glucose use the same pathway to pass into cells (assisted by insulin), and if theyre both present in the bloodstream at the same time they compete to get in the door. And guess who gets preferential treatment? Sugar, of course. I mean, if theres a cookie and and orange in front of your face, which do you want more? But seriously, sugar at least means momentary sustenance to keep a cell alive, so sugar gets preferential treatment. Where does this leave vitamin C? Im assuming floating around, looking for a home, and if it cant find one it will eventually be excreted by the body . Continue reading >>

Pauling Therapy Exceptions

Pauling Therapy Exceptions

Contact Us About Us Change Autoship Stop Autoship Update Credit Card or Account Info Site Map Dosages must be adequate and maintained for symptom relief. Ascorbic acid is the only form recommended and used in Tower products. (For example, a calcium ascorbate form would provide too much calcium at the dosages recommended by Linus Pauling and could contribute to arterial wall calcium deposits. We have had reports of failure using calcium ascorbate.) Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) 6,000 to 18,000 mg daily. Pauling recommended 6,000 to 18,000 mg of pure ascorbic acid daily. Generally, the higher the dosage of vitamin C the more rapid the response. Bowel tolerance (See Vitamin C - Titrating to Tolerance ) ranges from 4 to 20 grams daily. Our experience is that as much as 8,000 mg may be required for six months to substantially lower total cholesterol. Per Pauling's book, How to Live Longer and Feel Better (1986), it is acceptable to add some baking soda to make swallowing easier. Keep in mind that drug store vitamin C contains additional additives that can be toxic at the levels that Pauling recommended. Tower's Pauling therapy formulas contain no fillers, binders or preservatives and are completely safe at high levels. Lysine 5,000 - 6,000 mg daily. We know of one 70-year-old man whose 50% blockage was reversed on as little as 2,500 mg of lysine daily for one month, though on video Linus Pauling recommends supplementing with a minimum of 5 g to 6 g (5,000 mg to 6,000 mg) of lysine for advanced disease (2 jars). "First and foremost, and I regret this perhaps was not emphasized enough in the book Stop Americas #1 Killer, heart patients must address all chronic dental toxicity, especially root canals and advanced periodontal disease. A blow dryer on a stream of (toxic) water has n Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Antagonism With Sugar? Is It Real?

Vitamin C Antagonism With Sugar? Is It Real?

The discussion of the Linus Pauling vitamin C/lysine invention for chronic scurvy Vitamin C antagonism with Sugar? Is it real? Postby ofonorow Thu May 15, 2014 11:32 am Also Owen, I was wondering if you can shed some lite on the confusion about vitamin c,and sugar. There is some debate as to being consumed at the same time because both use the same pathway in the body. This doesn't make sense to me because fruit contain both vit,c and sugar. Can you clear this up for me? I agree with you. I originally accepted the idea by Ely and in many books of a GLUT receptor - Insulin mediated glucose pathway - being dominant. In a nutshell, I no longer believe the glucose pathway is the primary way vitamin C enters cells. I do believe that the partially oxidized DHA form (vitamin C that becomes oxidized in the blood) can enter cells through the GLUT, and for most humans with low vitamin C intake this could be an important secondary pathway to recover and regenerate ascorbate. But I believe the SVCT (may have initials wrong - sodium transport) is the way reduced ascorbic acid enters cells. I agree with you that it is the only explanation that makes sense given ascorbate's role in reducing glutathione, etc. We discuss this at length at the forum. Do I need to take Cardio C away from any sugar intake, which would be very hard as sugar is in almost everything. In my opinion heart and cancer patients should reduce carbs (and thus sugars). Biochemist Sherry Lewin wrote that carbs in the diet taken with vitamin C will work to break down vitamin C in the gut, making it less bioavailable but that proteins (amino acids) chelate with ascorbate, making it more bioavailable. We didn't know this when we designed Cardio-C - but lysine chelating with C may explain the success. In any event, I wou Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Til You Poop | Contrast

Vitamin C Til You Poop | Contrast

August 26, 2013 brandonadams Leave a comment Go to comments I got in a fight with a nasty cold this week. I survived it and want to share what Ive learned. Everyone knows that the best medicine for a cold is lots and lots of orange juice. You need to keep fluids moving through you to help flush things out and orange juice gives you the vitamin C you need to fight the cold. But does it really help? Well, you have to factor in the fructose content of orange juice. Eating straight oranges includes fiber that slows the release of fructose into your body, but fruit juice doesnt slow the sugar dump so your body gets overwhelmed with fructose. When that happens, your body has to waste energy processing and cleaning up the fructose, and furthermore, fructose itselfr educes your immune systems ability to eat invaders by over 41 percent. It takes more than five hours for your immune system to return to normal. One of the more damaging food components to our immune system is sugar. In one study, the ingestion of 100 gram (roughly 3-1/2 ounces) portions of carbohydrate as glucose, fructose, sucrose, honey, and pasteurized orange juice all significantly reduced the ability of white blood cells (neutrophils) to engulf and destroy bacteria. -Low Immune Function , see also Sugar SupressesImmuneSystem | Marks Daily Apple And if youre eating carbs high in glucose, like toast, then youre also inhibiting the vitamin C from entering your cells. In the 1970s, Dr. John Ely discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory. Glucose and vitamin C (ascorbate) have a very similar chemical makeup. This theory proposes that elevated glucose levels compete and effectively restrict vitamin C from entering cells. Both glucose and vitamin C depend upon the pancreatic hormone insulin and its sig Continue reading >>

Insulin Stimulates Vitamin C Recycling And Ascorbate Accumulation In Osteoblastic Cells

Insulin Stimulates Vitamin C Recycling And Ascorbate Accumulation In Osteoblastic Cells

Insulin modulates the differentiation and synthetic activity of osteoblasts, but its mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Because ascorbate also influences osteoblast differentiation and is a cofactor for collagen synthesis, we examined the effects of insulin on the transport and metabolism of vitamin C in osteoblastic cells. UMR-106 rat osteoblast-like cells accumulated ascorbate intracellularly when incubated with dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA; oxidized vitamin C). Insulin increased the intracellular concentration of ascorbate derived from DHAA and also increased the initial rates of uptake of DHAA and 2-deoxyglucose, but not that of ascorbate. A half-maximal effect on DHAA uptake was observed with approximately 100 pm insulin, whereas insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) was less potent. Preincubation with insulin for 612 h was required for stimulation, similar to the period needed for increased expression of facilitative hexose transporters (GLUT). DHAA uptake was inhibited by the GLUT antagonist cytochalasin B as well as by the GLUT substrates d-glucose and 2-deoxyglucose, whereas l-glucose and fructose had no effect. We conclude that insulin and IGF-I stimulate osteoblastic uptake of DHAA through facilitative hexose transporters. The relative potency of insulin in stimulating DHAA uptake is consistent with mediation by insulin receptors. DHAA is reduced to ascorbate within osteoblasts, maintaining a high intracellular concentration of ascorbate available for collagen synthesis. Impaired uptake of DHAA may contribute to the osteopenia associated with type I diabetes. In addition, cytotoxic levels of DHAA may accumulate in the extracellular fluid due to decreased transport activity and competitive inhibition by elevated concentrations of glucose. INSULIN and Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Glucose And Vitamin C Plays A Huge Role In Health

The Relationship Between Glucose And Vitamin C Plays A Huge Role In Health

Vitamin C is made naturally in almost all living animals except humans, primates and guinea pigs. Dogs and cats produce their own vitamin C from ingested food that have metabolized into glucose. Humans must consume vitamin C from its food sources, or they risk severe health problems. There is an intimate relationship between glucose and vitamin C that has a dramatic impact on immunity and overall cellular health. Most animals and plants are able to synthesize their own vitamin C. This is done through a biochemical pathway that depends on 4 key enzymes which convert glucose to vitamin C. In mammals, the glucose is extracted from stored sugar (glycogen) and the transformation into vitamin C is produced in the liver. Humans lack the L-gulonolactone oxidase enzyme that is critical for the last step of vitamin C synthesis. Humans require a good amount of vitamin C in order to build healthy tissue collagen and promote strong immune function. When low levels of vitamin C are present, the body makes due by recycling the oxidized version of vitamin C. This redox cycling is performed by the master anti-oxidant glutathione. As long as enough glutathione is present, the vitamin C redox cycle can continue. In the 1970's, Dr. John Ely discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory. Glucose and vitamin C (ascorbate) have a very similar chemical makeup. This theory proposes that elevated glucose levels compete and effectively restrict vitamin C from entering cells. Both glucose and vitamin C depend upon the pancreatic hormone insulin and its signaling effects in order to get into cells. The GLUT-1 Receptor There is an important receptor called the Glut-1 receptor that activates in response to insulin to allow both glucose and vitamin C to enter the cell. However, glucose has Continue reading >>

Ascorbic Acid And Other Modern Analogs Of The Germ Theory - John T. A. Ely, Ph.d.

Ascorbic Acid And Other Modern Analogs Of The Germ Theory - John T. A. Ely, Ph.d.

The Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol. 14, 3rd Quarter 1999 Ascorbic Acid and Other Modern Analogs of the Germ Theory On the Cost of Traditional Opposition to Modernization in Clinical Medicine The Modus of Opposition. There is an almost universally held view that medicine is and should be a prestigious profession. Sadly, in recent decades, significant erosion of this view has occurred. The general nature of the erosion and other published laments are cited here. There is preponderant agreement among scientists and the lay public that medicine has an obligation to know what is known (i.e. that given modalities have been reported in the literature by competent authors to be far superior to corresponding treatments of choice, but their adoption has been opposed without reason). Work by Hoffer and Pauling led to a fundamental principle of orthomolecular medicine which involves the adjustment of levels of molecules that are normally in the body which can both prevent and cure disease with little toxicity or side effects compared to xenobiotic drugs. The theme detailed in this paper was developed by Pauling,1 Klenner (p.63),2 Shute (pp. 77-83, Appendices),3 Coca (pp.185-9)4 and others (hereinafter called Pauling et al.) who: (1) cite evidence they claim proves that virtually every disease can be treated with far greater safety and efficacy5,6 i.e. with less Morbidity & Mortality (M&M) and far less cost, with rejected modalities (frequently orthomolecular) alone, or adjunctively to standard care in some cases; (2) report that mainstream medicine has either ignored or actively opposed adoption of these modalities by falsely condemning them without investigation or proper clinical trial; (3) claim that these actions have doomed most US citizens to disease-filled lives and Continue reading >>

5 Simple Sugar Swaps To Help Boost Your Immunity

5 Simple Sugar Swaps To Help Boost Your Immunity

Sugar has been on my mind a lot lately. Im spending more time in Malaysia at the moment and the locals here (Im technically one too ) just LOVE sugar. Its in just about every food, and there are cake shops everywhere. Even Starbucks has far more varieties of cake available than in the UK. I have to confess that I had been over-indulging too, and I know from past experience that if I keep that up for too long, it lowers my immunity. No surprises, I came down with a cold. The great news is that my diet as a whole is based on clean and nutrient-dense foods, and I knew exactly what to do to get back on track. As a result, my cold only lasted a day and a half and as I write you, Im happily feeling back on top once again. But how exactly does too much sugar affect your immunity? One of the major ways in which sugar affects our immunity is through its impact on Vitamin C. Many of us are already aware that Vitamin C, also known as ascorbate, plays a role in our immunity. We often talk about taking Vitamin C when we get a cold, for example. Vitamin C is used by our body to help our immune cells (white blood cells) to multiply, and it is these cells that ingest and neutralize pathogenic bacteria and viruses, keeping us healthy, through a process known as phagocytosis. In 1972, Dr. John Ely identified that the level of availability of Vitamin C in our cells determines the rate and intensity of our immune cells to respond when needed, and discovered the Glucose-Ascorbate-Antagonism (GAA) theory. You see, in order for both glucose and Vitamin C to enter our cells, they use what are known as receptors. Because they are chemically configured so similarly, they both use the same receptor the GLUT-1 receptor. This receptor is activated in response to insulin, which is released when our Continue reading >>

Vitamin C Foundation

Vitamin C Foundation

"For three days I have been listeningto talks about the value of large intakes of vitamin C and othernatural substances, and I have not heard a single mention of the nameLinus Pauling. Has not the time come when we should admit that Paulingwas right all along" Carlos Krumdieck MD tostanding ovation at 1992 New York Academy of Sciences symposium inArlington, VA Linus Pauling, PhD,A Decade After His Last Interview, His Reputation Continues toGrow... "On August 19, 1994, Linus Pauling,PhD died of cancer at age 93 at his home in Big Sur, California.The only person to win two unshared Nobel prizes (for Chemistry in 1954and Peace in 1962), Pauling, during the last 25 years of his life,became a vocal and uniquely effective advocate for vitamin C andnutritional medicine. He has been given credit by many people for almost single handedlymaking vitamin C the most popular and widely used nutritionalsupplement in the world and for helping to significantly advance thefields of clinical nutrition, primary prevention, and "orthomolecular"medicine (a term he coined)." My name is Pauline (Sarah) Sowders. I am 62 years old and had quadrupleheart bypass surgery March 2002. Had incredibly difficult timerecuperating. Disagreed with my doctor on treatment regarding statindrugs. My problems with statins were muscle cramps, severe joint pain,stomach pain, depression and nerve problems which finally caused me totake a medical leave from my job this past March. Some time ago afriend recommended taking the following supplements instead ofprescription drugs: Sept 1st of this year I found the following statement on a web site(can't remember where but thank GOD!). "Try this - guaranteed to lower cholesterolat least 18% in six weeks." 6000 mg.Vitamin C, 6000 mg L-Lysine, 200 mg CoQ10. I began taking Continue reading >>

Chapter 9: Health Nuremberg, Vitamins Are Gene Therapy, Glucose/ascorbate Antagonism And Other Random Thoughts

Chapter 9: Health Nuremberg, Vitamins Are Gene Therapy, Glucose/ascorbate Antagonism And Other Random Thoughts

Owen Richard Fonorow 2005 The Vitamin C Foundation There is a new tactic in the war of ideas between traditional and innovative medicine. The latest media propaganda blames incurable chronic disease on faulty genes, as if there are no treatments for genetic defects. What the public isnt being told is that megadose vitamins are often the best answer to problem genes. While reading the medical news, one may notice the flood of stories crediting medical science with discovering a gene responsible for various medical conditions. The subliminal message seems to be that there is nothing that can be done right now; however, modern medicine is on the case. The apparent aim of these stories is to divert the publics attention from medical sciences inability to find cures for these various medical conditions. Unbeknownst to those behind the media hype, high-dose vitamins can compensate for bad genes, and some vitamins already are known for their ability to repair damagedDNA. Our genetics and the vitamins we require daily for health are closely related. Genes contain the instructions that our body needs to make us physically who we are. Vitamins help genes carry out these instructions. Our genes create proteins (technically, genes in our DNA contain a blueprint for a protein, and the nucleic acid RNA uses the genes blueprint to make various proteins). Of the 50,000 or so proteins the human body produces, the vast majority are enzymes. Enzymes control the chemical reactions within the body. Vitamins are usually specialized molecules called co-enzymes, which regulate various enzyme reactions. Generally, co-enzymes are not destroyed during reactions with their target enzymes. Small amounts of co-enzymes are usually sufficient for health. Vitamins may affect both the rate at which pro Continue reading >>

Ascorbic Acid Participates In A General Mechanism For Concerted Glucose Transportinhibition And Lactate Transport Stimulation.

Ascorbic Acid Participates In A General Mechanism For Concerted Glucose Transportinhibition And Lactate Transport Stimulation.

1. Pflugers Arch. 2008 Nov;457(2):519-28. doi: 10.1007/s00424-008-0526-1. Epub 2008 May 28. Ascorbic acid participates in a general mechanism for concerted glucose transportinhibition and lactate transport stimulation. Castro MA(1), Angulo C, Brauchi S, Nualart F, Concha II. (1)Instituto de Bioqumica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile. In this paper, we present a novel function for ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is animportant water-soluble antioxidant and cofactor in various enzyme systems. Wehave previously demonstrated that an increase in neuronal intracellular ascorbic acid is able to inhibit glucose transport in cortical and hippocampal neurons.Because of the presence of sodium-dependent vitamin C transporters, ascorbic acidis highly concentrated in brain, testis, lung, and adrenal glands. In this work, we explored how ascorbic acid affects glucose and lactate uptake in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Using immunofluorescence and reverse transcriptase-polymerasechain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, the expression of glucose and ascorbic acidtransporters in non-neuronal cells was studied. Like neurons, HEK293 cellsexpressed GLUT1, GLUT3, and SVCT2. With radioisotope-based methods, onlyintracellular ascorbic acid, but not extracellular, inhibits 2-deoxyglucosetransport in HEK293 cells. As monocarboxylates such as pyruvate and lactate, are important metabolic sources, we analyzed the ascorbic acid effect on lactatetransport in cultured neurons and HEK293 cells. Intracellular ascorbic acid wasable to stimulate lactate transport in both cell types. Extracellular ascorbicacid did not affect this transport. Our data show that ascorbic acid inhibitsglucose transport and stimulates lactate transport in neuronal and non-neuronalcells. Mammalian Continue reading >>

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