diabetestalk.net

Glucosamine And Type 1 Diabetes

Glucosamine Is Ok To Take With Diabetes Medication: You Docs

Glucosamine Is Ok To Take With Diabetes Medication: You Docs

Glucosamine is OK to take with diabetes medication: You Docs I've been trying to get my dad to take glucosamine sulfate to help his arthritis. He is a diabetic and is concerned that the supplement may interfere with his diabetes medicine. Should he worry? Probably not. He may be thinking of research done years ago indicating that glucosamine sulfate, which often is recommended to ease pain from osteoarthritis (the most common type), affected blood sugar levels in people with diabetes and might interfere with diabetes medications. However, studies done later found the opposite: The supplement didn't raise blood sugar, nor is there any evidence that glucosamine makes insulin less efficient in humans. More recently, there were a couple of scary reports that glucosamine knocked out insulin-producing pancreas cells. That study was done in rodents that were given five to 10 times the recommended dose. Glucosamine can take four to eight weeks to work, and it doesn't help everyone, but we see no reason why your dad can't give it a try, as long as he monitors his blood sugar. And he should talk to his doc -- as he would before taking any supplement -- to determine whether the usual glucosamine dose -- about 1,500 milligrams a day-- is OK for him. Health tip of the week: Bone health is for men, too Memo to all the guys out there (and the women who love you): Quit walking to the kitchen every time those bone-health commercials come on. All the talk about osteoporosis is not for women only. Twelve million men have bones that are getting thinner and brittler each day. Fortunately, we've got some irresistible ways to keep yours safe, strong and young. How about a beer? Ah, now you're paying attention! The bone-saving secret in brewskies is silicon, a chemical that stimulates collage Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Glucosamine-chondroitin Supplementation On Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusa Placebo-controlled, Double-blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial

The Effect Of Glucosamine-chondroitin Supplementation On Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusa Placebo-controlled, Double-blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial

Background With increasing use of glucosamine-containing supplements for the treatment of osteoarthritis, there is increasing concern in the medical community about possible toxic effects. The present study was undertaken to determine whether glucosamine supplementation altered hemoglobin A1c concentrations in patients with well-controlled diabetes mellitus. Objective To evaluate possible effects of glucosamine supplementation on glycemic control in a selected population of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design Placebo-controlled, double-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Setting Outpatient, diabetes monitoring clinic. Patients Patients were typically elderly patients, evenly divided between men and women. Most of the patients were being treated with 1 or 2 drugs for glycemic control. Intervention In daily doses for 90 days, patients received either placebo or a combination of 1500 mg of glucosamine hydrochloride with 1200 mg of chondroitin sulfate (Cosamin DS; Nutramax Laboratories Inc, Edgewood, Md). Main Outcome Measure Hemoglobin A1c levels before and after 90 days of therapy. Results There were 4 withdrawals from the glucosamine-treated group. Three were related to comorbidities (myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation) and 1 to a possible adverse reaction (excessive flatus). No other patient reported any adverse effects of glucosamine therapy, and no patient had any change in their diabetes management. Mean hemoglobin A1c concentrations were not significantly different between groups prior to glucosamine therapy. Posttreatment hemoglobin A1c concentrations were not significantly different between groups, nor were there any significant differences within groups before and after treatment. Conclusion This study demonstrate Continue reading >>

Glucosamine-like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes

Glucosamine-like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes

Glucosamine-Like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes A glucosamine-like dietary supplement has been found to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes mellitus, according to University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers. In studies on mice, Dr. Michael Demetriou and colleagues with the UC Irvine Center for Immunology found that N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc), which is similar but more effective than the widely available glucosamine, inhibited the growth and function of abnormal T-cells that incorrectly direct the immune system to attack specific tissues in the body, such as brain myelin in MS and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas [beta cells] in diabetes. Study results appear on the online version of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. This finding shows the potential of using a dietary supplement to help treat autoimmune diseases, said Demetriou, an assistant professor of neurology, and microbiology and molecular genetics. Most importantly, we understand how this sugar-based supplement inhibits the cells that attack the body, making metabolic therapy a rational approach to prevent or treat these debilitating diseases. The UC Irvine study defines how metabolic therapy with the sugar GlcNAc and other related nutrients modifies the growth and autoimmune activity of T-cells. Virtually all proteins on the surface of cells, including T-cells, are modified with complex sugars of variable lengths and composition. Recent studies have shown that changes in these sugars are often associated with T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmune disease. In mouse models of both MS and type 1 diabetes, Demetriou and colleagues found that GlcNAc prevented this hyperactivity and autoimmune response by increasi Continue reading >>

Glucosamine And Diabetes Connection

Glucosamine And Diabetes Connection

You are here: Home / diabetes greenberth / Glucosamine And Diabetes Connection Specimen Type: EDTA Plasma. How to Get Rid of Painful Cracked Lips. Glucosamine And Diabetes Connection diabetes Pocket Guide: Full illustrated (English Edition) eBook: HC-HealthComm: Amazon. Chronic wounds are a common complication in patients with diabetes that often lead to amputation. News colitis type 1 diabetes vitiligo Graves disease Take the Quiz: Diabetes. into cells where it is stored and later used for energy.There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2 [1]. Choose a variety of foods that are high in nutrition and low in empty calories. Treating Diabetic Hypoglycemia :: Diabetes Type 1 Type 2 The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days. Friel Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus* During Pregnancy A MEDICAL EDUCATION BLOG. Make balancing your blood sugar simple even when youre offline. Research has shown that both pre-gestational diabetes and gestational diabetes contribute to the high prevalence of diabetes in First Nations populations. Diabetes Type 2 Nursing Diagnosis Uncontrolled DIABETES TYPE 2 NURSING DIAGNOSIS ] and heart related illnesses.Diabetes Type 2 Nursing treat diabetic emergencies Okra For Diabetes :: Okra For Diabetes Water is important nutrient of life and have many benefits for your organism. Join us for an educational diagnosis and treatment of type 2 diabetes. Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes :: Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes : Diabetes Care Center Salinas Ca ; Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes Diabetes Rates By Country Diabetes Care Plan ::The 3 Step Trick that Reverses Diabetes Permanently in As Little as 11 Days.[ DIABETES RATES BY COUNTRY Call (770) 754-1600 for appointments. The campaign Continue reading >>

Glucosamine: Does It Affect Blood Sugar?

Glucosamine: Does It Affect Blood Sugar?

Even though glucosamine is technically a type of sugar, it doesn't appear to affect blood sugar levels or insulin sensitivity. Some early research had suggested that glucosamine might worsen insulin resistance, which can contribute to increases in blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. But later studies refuted these findings. Glucosamine is one of the most popular dietary supplements sold in the United States, although study results have been mixed regarding its ability to reduce osteoarthritis pain. Although glucosamine doesn't appear to affect glucose levels or insulin sensitivity, it can interact with other medications you might be taking — such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), a blood thinner. As is important with any dietary supplement, talk to your doctor before you add glucosamine to your daily regimen. Continue reading >>

Glucosamine-like Supplement May Inhibit Diabetes

Glucosamine-like Supplement May Inhibit Diabetes

Glucosamine-like supplement may inhibit diabetes Researchers at the University of California Irvine found that a supplement that chemically resembles glucosamine may suppress the damaging autoimmune response that occurs when one develops type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. This finding shows the potential of using a dietary supplement to help treat autoimmune diseases, said Dr. Michael Demetriou, the studys lead researcher. Most importantly, we understand how this sugar-based supplement inhibits the cells that attack the body, making metabolic therapy a rational approach to prevent or treat these debilitating diseases. In mice given MS or diabetes, the scientists found that the supplement prevented the autoimmune hyperactivity that happens in response to the development of the diseases. The findings suggest that there are viable metabolic therapies to treating these illnesses. Those interested in increasing their glucosamine intake may want to consider taking dietary supplements, like those offered by Dr. Newtons Naturals. Nutranetics Glucosamine Sulfate from Dr. Newtons Naturals contains naturally-occurring nutrients found in the shells of shrimp. Regular use may help promote healthy joints and cartilage maintenance, and absorbs quickly into the system thanks to its Advanced Delivery Enzymes. View products related to Health Concerns . Continue reading >>

Newstat | Glucosamine Study Finds No Link To Diabetes

Newstat | Glucosamine Study Finds No Link To Diabetes

Glucosamine study finds no link to diabetes A short-term study on the supplement glucosamine-chondroitin sulfate (Glu-CS) in dogs found no link to diabetes mellitus or to an increase in serum fructosamine. The researchers gave 12 healthy adult dogs Glu-CS supplements and a placebo orally for 21 days each. They found that the supplements did not significantly change the serum fructosamine levels of the dogs. The study cites some concern among veterinarians that glucosamine supplements can either affect glycemic control in diabetic patients, or may even cause diabetes mellitus. However, none of the dogs in the study developed diabetes mellitus, and the changes noted in serum fructosamine concentration after the supplements were given did not differ significantly from the effects of the placebo. Joe Bartges, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, DACVN, is professor of medicine and nutrition at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. Bartges said that he recommends glucosamine supplements, especially in larger dogs that are prone to osteoarthritis. He said he has not personally seen any problems with diabetic dogs taking glucosamine, but there is some concern. The concern is it has not been proven yet in dogs or humans, he said. The only study in humans was over 90 days (rather than 21 days) and did not find a problem with glucosamine administration. That study , from 2003, looked at glucosamine-chondroitin supplement use in human patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. It set out to find whether the supplements would affect glycemic control in these patients, and after 90 days it did not. Oral glucosamine supplementation does not result in clinically significant alterations in glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, the human study concludes. Bartges Continue reading >>

Glucosamine: The New Metformin? | Interview With Dr. Michael Ristow (part Ii)

Glucosamine: The New Metformin? | Interview With Dr. Michael Ristow (part Ii)

Last week when we heard from Dr. Ristow , he turned the outdated notion of the free radical theory of aging on its head, and demonstrated that antioxidants like vitamin A and vitamin C arent all theyre cracked up to be. But if those supplements cant help us, what can? Perhaps, says Ristow, the answer can be found in the mitohormetic effects of an inexpensive over-the-counter compound, one with enough promise that it may someday rival metformin as the darling of the anti-aging set. So weve discussed this effect called hormesis, where substances that are toxic at high doses can actually be helpful in low doses. Theres a related word that pops up a lot in your research, mitohormesiswhat is that? Its an abbreviation of mitochondrial hormesis, and it essentially translates this hormesis principle, which normally applies to compounds and drugs, to whatever comes out the mitochondria. So mitochondria send out signals that promote health and lifespan at low doses, and at higher doses these signals do the opposite. The most well-established signal from the mitochondria is reactive oxygen species, but there are also other signals, small peptides that some groups have started working on like humanin and MOTS-c. And then there are metabolites, like beta hydroxybutyrate, which is produced a lot by the mitochondria if youre on a ketogenic diet. Beta hydroxybutyrate also has mitohormetic effects, so it signals to other compartments of the cell and promotes health. Does free radical production become a problem as mitochondria get older and start producing more free radicals? While older mitochondria do produce more free radicals, its unclear whether that really accelerates aging. I think it does at very high, artificial doses. For example, one very artificial mouse model showed that m Continue reading >>

Glucosamine-like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes

Glucosamine-like Supplement Inhibits Multiple Sclerosis, Type 1 Diabetes

A glucosamine-like dietary supplement has been found to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes mellitus, according to University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers. A glucosamine-like dietary supplement has been found to suppress the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes mellitus, according to University of California, Irvine health sciences researchers. In studies on mice, Dr. Michael Demetriou and colleagues with the UC Irvine Center for Immunology found that N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), which is similar but more effective than the widely available glucosamine, inhibited the growth and function of abnormal T-cells that incorrectly direct the immune system to attack specific tissues in the body, such as brain myelin in MS and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas in diabetes. Study results appear on the online version of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. This finding shows the potential of using a dietary supplement to help treat autoimmune diseases, said Demetriou, an assistant professor of neurology, and microbiology and molecular genetics. Most importantly, we understand how this sugar-based supplement inhibits the cells that attack the body, making metabolic therapy a rational approach to prevent or treat these debilitating diseases. The UC Irvine study defines how metabolic therapy with the sugar GlcNAc and other related nutrients modifies the growth and autoimmune activitiy of T-cells. Virtually all proteins on the surface of cells, including T-cells, are modified with complex sugars of variable lengths and composition. Recent studies have shown that changes in these sugars are often associated with T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmune disease. In mouse mo Continue reading >>

Is Glucosamine Safe For Me?

Is Glucosamine Safe For Me?

I am 71 years old, and I have type 2 diabetes. Last year I developed joint problems in both shoulders. Doctors have prescribed physical therapy, which has helped some but not very much. The supplement glucosamine has helped several people I know who have similar shoulder problems. However, these people don't have diabetes. I want to try the supplement, but I have read that glucosamine may contribute to insulin resistance. Elwin Beck, Rio Vista, California Craig Williams, PharmD, responds: Glucosamine is definitely safe to try. While there are anecdotal reports of patients with diabetes experiencing slight elevations in blood glucose with either glucosamine hydrochloride or glucosamine sulfate, in the few human studies that have been carefully done, no effect can be detected. These studies are often based on glycated hemoglobin (hemoglobin with glucose attached to itnot a direct measure of glucose levels), and the studies pool the results from many patients, so it is always possible that some individual patients may experience slight changes in blood glucose. Monitoring would obviously be prudent. But again, we consider it safe to try in patients with diabetes. However, glucosamine being safe doesn't mean that it's effective. Controlled clinical trials have not found a significant positive effect, but some individual patients do seem to experience a benefit. Glucosamine is important for the repair and maintenance of healthy cartilage in joints, but taking it in an oral form may not get it to where it needs to be in an amount that will do any real good. Much of it is broken down in the stomach and digestive tract. Even short trials where similar compounds are injected directly into arthritic joints have not found a significant benefit, and a large study published in the Continue reading >>

Study Suggests Glucosamine Sulfate May Promote Development Of Insulin Resistance

Study Suggests Glucosamine Sulfate May Promote Development Of Insulin Resistance

Study Suggests Glucosamine Sulfate May Promote Development of Insulin Resistance New York (MedscapeWire) Apr 18 A research study presented at the annual Experimental Biology scientific meetings in San Diego, California, cautioned that consumption of the popular dietary supplement glucosamine sulfate may actually increase the risk of developing insulin resistance and may worsen control of diabetes in patients with this disease. Glucosamine sulfate is widely used to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis and other chronic joint conditions. "Somewhat to our surprise, we found that taking glucosamine sulfate supplements may promote insulin resistance. Our data, from a preliminary 15 subject study, suggest that taking glucosamine sulfate could decrease the metabolic actions of insulin, already a potential concern in obese patients or people with high risk factors such as high blood pressure, genetic predisposition to diabetes or heart disease. Our data also suggest that glucosamine sulfate may aggravate blood sugar control in diabetic patients," said Anthony L. Almada, MSc, president and chief scientific officer of IMAGINutrition, sister company of MetaResponse Sciences, one of the institutions that conducted the study. The double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized 12-week study involved 15 patients and was conducted by scientists at Los Angeles College of Chiropractic in addition to those at MetaResponse Sciences. Since injections of glucosamine produce an "acute" form of type II diabetes in animals the scientists wondered if this would occur in humans taking glucosamine sulfate orally. Previous clinical studies have measured only blood glucose but not blood insulin, the hormone from the pancreas that is underproduced or "under-effective" in diabetics. Almada added, "We reco Continue reading >>

Review The Effect Of Glucosamine On Glucose Metabolism In Humans: A Systematic Review Of The Literature

Review The Effect Of Glucosamine On Glucose Metabolism In Humans: A Systematic Review Of The Literature

Summary Objective Glucosamine is commonly used for the treatment of osteoarthritis. It is available as an over the counter preparation and also as a prescription pharmaceutical. There is concern from animal experiments that glucosamine may alter glucose metabolism through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway. The objective of this systematic review is to determine if exogenous glucosamine adversely affects glucose metabolism in humans. This review does not separate out the effects on glucose metabolism of the various glucosamine preparations. An English-language literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and EBM Reviews (1950–February 2009) was conducted. The bibliographies of selected papers were manually searched for additional references. Two reviewers independently analyzed studies for quality and content using a standardized data extraction form. Eleven studies were included. Six studies were randomized controlled trials and the remaining five were prospective studies with or without controls. Four of the studies found decreased insulin sensitivity or increased fasting glucose in subjects taking glucosamine. Three of these were clinical studies using oral glucosamine. Studies that included subjects with baseline impaired glucose tolerance or insulin resistance were more likely to detect an effect on glucose metabolism than studies without such subjects. Conclusion Clinical studies, including three using oral glucosamine, have provided mixed evidence about the effect of exogenous glucosamine on glucose metabolism in humans. Therefore, more studies are needed, particularly including subjects at high risk for impairments in glucose homeostasis, before a definite conclusion can be made. Fig. 1. Study selection for systematic review. Fig. 2. Association between subject chara Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes (mellitus) Causes, Symptoms And Complications

Type 1 Diabetes (mellitus) Causes, Symptoms And Complications

Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes/Diabetes mellitus which means pancreas not producing insulin or sufficient insulin. This insulin is a hormone, which allows glucose (Sugar) to enter the cells to produce energy. Type 1 Diabetes- Which is affected by different factors, such as hereditary and some viruses. Even though type 1 diabetes usually comes during childhood or teenage and it can develop in adults. There is the only way to survive with types 1 diabetes is injecting the insulin under the skin, it can be delivered to the cells by the insulin pump. So, it regulates the high blood glucose levels. A healthy diet and exercise is can also an important part of managing a type 1 diabetes. Excessive dosing of insulin will down blood sugar levels, which give more complications. Also read: Diabetes - Type 1 and Type 2 Causes and Reason Herbanutrin How untreated type 1 diabetes affects human body: Untreated diabetes can cause severe complications such as coma, and long-term complication like heart disease, stroke, eye damage, foot ulcer and kidney failure. About 1.25 million Americans have type 1 diabetes. Every year newly 40,000 people are affects by types 1 and diagnosed in the United States. The American diabetes associated is dedicated to the research-need to educate and advise the people who are affected by diabetes. Do you have these diabetes signs and symptoms? There are some classic symptoms of type 1 diabetes, which increases in short time of period. The exact cause of type 1diabetes is strange. Typically, the bodys own immune system, which is used the fight against harmful bacteria and viruses, which destroys the insulin-producing cells (islet or islets) in the pancreas. The pancreas secretes insulin into the blood. Insulin circulates, allowing glucose Continue reading >>

Prolonged Use Of Glucosamine Linked To Greater Risk Of Developing Diabetes

Prolonged Use Of Glucosamine Linked To Greater Risk Of Developing Diabetes

Prolonged use of glucosamine linked to greater risk of developing diabetes High doses or prolonged use of glucosamine causes the death of pancreatic cells and could increase the risk of developing diabetes, according to a team of researchers at Universit- Laval's Faculty of Pharmacy. Details of this discovery were recently published on the website of the Journal of Endocrinology. In vitro tests conducted by Professor Fr-d-ric Picard and his team revealed that glucosamine exposure causes a significant increase in mortality in insulin-producing pancreatic cells, a phenomenon tied to the development of diabetes . Cell death rate increases with glucosamine dose and exposure time. "In our experiments, we used doses five to ten times higher than that recommended by most manufacturers, or 1,500 mg/day," stressed Professor Picard. "Previous studies showed that a significant proportion of glucosamine users up the dose hoping to increase the effects," he explained. Tattoo sensor: A needleless glucose monitor for diabetes patients Picard and his team have shown that glucosamine triggers a mechanism intended to lower very high blood sugar levels. However, this reaction negatively affects SIRT1, a protein critical to cell survival. A high concentration of glucosamine diminishes the level of SIRT1, leading to cell death in the tissues where this protein is abundant, such as the pancreas. Individuals who use large amounts of glucosamine, those who consume it for long periods, and those with little SIRT1 in their cells are therefore believed to be at greater risk of developing diabetes. In a number of mammal species, SIRT1 level diminishes with age. This phenomenon has not been shown in humans but if it were the case, the elderly-who constitute the target market for glucosamine-would Continue reading >>

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine Supplements: Good For Joints But Possibly Risky For Diabetes

Glucosamine is a popular dietary supplement used by many who suffer from joint pain. Most dietary supplements make claims that aren’t backed by scientific research, but NIH reports that daily doses of glucosamine can lower pain. As a result, the supplements are recommended by many physicians. However, glucosamine is a sugar that uses some glucose processing pathways. It is processed mainly through the “Hexosamine Biosynthetic Pathway,” which is involved in both glucose transport and the development of insulin resistance-the main cause of type 2 diabetes.[1] Does that mean that these pills can be dangerous? A person with diabetes does not produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar levels in the body. Without the right amount of insulin (which is what we mean by “insulin resistance”), glucose can not be properly absorbed and used, leading to too little or too much sugar circulating in the body.[1] More research is needed to determine whether glucosamine supplements can cause diabetes in healthy adults, but meanwhile, if you are already at risk for diabetes or have diabetes, you may want to think twice before taking glucosamine. Glucosamine is already used in laboratory settings and animal studies to induce insulin resistance for the purpose of studying the condition and drugs to treat it, so clearly scientists are confident it has that effect. We also know from animal studies that glucosamine interferes with the liver’s ability to control glucose production, glucose uptake by surrounding tissue, and insulin production in pancreatic beta-cell.[2] A study of healthy men and women taking 1500mg of glucosamine a day for six weeks, published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, concluded that adults who already have poor insulin sensitivity will inc Continue reading >>

More in diabetes