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Glucometers Comparison

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Glucometers Used In Hospitals And In Outpatient Settings With The Laboratory Reference Method In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Mumbai

Comparison Of Glucometers Used In Hospitals And In Outpatient Settings With The Laboratory Reference Method In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Mumbai

Go to: Diabetes Mellitus is a non-communicable disease reaching epidemic proportions globally. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes show a direct relationship between the glycemic control and the risk of systemic complications. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) promotes self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to allow diabetic patients to achieve and maintain specific glycemic goals. ADA recommends that all insulin-treated patients perform SMBG to (a) achieve and maintain glycemic control, (b) prevent and detect hypoglycemia, (c) adjust changes in lifestyle. SMBG is also used in establishing the need for insulin therapy in gestational diabetes mellitus. With the introduction of glucometers, there has been an ongoing, competition-driven development in both meter and strip technology, which has allowed for greater accuracy and reliability of results. However, despite the advances in technology, there is significant variation among these monitoring devices, which has necessitated the development of performance guidelines by organizations such as the ADA[1,2] and the International Standardization Organization (ISO). The ISO guidelines recommend that the accuracy criteria for values <100 mg/dl to ±10 mg/dl and ±20% for values ≥100 mg/dl. However, the ADA recommends a ±5% variation for all values.[3,4] Glucometers which are available in hospital settings are different from the portable glucometers used by patients at home and are not available in the open market due to marketing policies. The methods used for the estimation of blood glucose levels are similar in both the hospital based and out-patient glucometers. However the hospital based glucometers are modified taking into consideration various other parameters such as pH, oxygenation, temperature, humidity, hematoc Continue reading >>

A Comparison Of Five Glucometers In South Africa

A Comparison Of Five Glucometers In South Africa

JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. A comparison of five glucometers in South Africa Essack Y. ; Hoffman M. ; Rensburg M. ; Van Wyk J. ; Meyer C.S. ; Erasmus R. (2009) Objective: To assess the accuracy and precision of five currently available blood glucose meters in South Africa Background: Since the introduction of glucometers, there has been an ongoing, competition-driven development in both meter and strip technology, which has allowed for greater accuracy and reliability of results. Despite the advances in technology, there is significant variation amongst these glucometers necessitating a proper evaluation before use. Methods: Glucose levels in capillary blood samples from 115 patients attending the diabetic clinic at Tygerberg Hospital were measured with each meter, and compared with the laboratory reference method. Results: The coefficients of variation (CVs) (imprecision) of most meters were acceptable at less than 5%, with a bias ranging from 1.7 to 6.8%. None of the glucometers satisfied the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendation of less than 5% bias. Conclusions: The study highlights the need for an objective and independent comparison of all glucometers in South Africa, as the variability observed can impact on patient care. Please refer to this item in SUNScholar by using the following persistent URL: Continue reading >>

Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Corresponding author: Division of Science, School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, UK. Tel: +44 1382 308494. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Kimberley A. Bennett, Lucy M. Turner, Sebastian Millward, Simon E. W. Moss, Ailsa J. Hall; Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals, Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Glucose is an important metabolic fuel and circulating levels are tightly regulated in most mammals, but can drop when body fuel reserves become critically low. Glucose is mobilized rapidly from liver and muscle during stress in response to increased circulating cortisol. Blood glucose levels can thus be of value in conservation as an indicator of nutritional status and may be a useful, rapid assessment marker for acute or chronic stress. However, seals show unusual glucose regulation: circulating levels are high and insulin sensitivity is limited. Accurate blood glucose measurement is therefore vital to enable meaningful health and physiological assessments in captive, wild or rehabilitated seals and to explore its utility as a marker of conservation relevance in these animals. Point-of-care devices are simple, portable, relatively cheap and use less blood compared with t Continue reading >>

Why Is The Glucometer Reading High Compared To The Lab Test Reading?

Why Is The Glucometer Reading High Compared To The Lab Test Reading?

Many users have responded with details about the difference. I’ll focus on a different aspect. The actual number does not matter much. I believe different labs will give out different readings for the blood glucose levels for the same blood sample. Dont worry too much about the actual number - focus on whether it is normal, high or low. Avoid lows, and minimise highs to ensure a good HbA1c (a 3 month average). I see a lot of people focussing on the number and getting stressed out - “my blood glucose is 150, I am worried”, etc. Stop worrying about the actual number - the number keeps fluctuating through out the day. What matters is a long term average and good HbA1c. I feel many people take the blood glucose reading like an exam score. High means failure; and within range means success. It is nothing like that - given the inaccuracies in the instrument and the fluctuations through out the day, dont feel stressed with a number above normal. Also, correlate the blood glucose readings with your HbA1c. If you are having a HbA1c reading of < 7 with a 140 mgdL fasting blood glucose level as measured by the glucometer; that’s fine. As long as the meter shows < 140 mgdL, you are good. You need to be concerned only if the reading is consistently above this. Continue reading >>

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

Comparison between glucometer and chemical analyzer for measuring blood glucose of diabetic patients strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 842. strict warning: Declaration of content_handler_field::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field.inc on line 208. strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589. strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 25. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135. strict warning: Non- Continue reading >>

(pdf) Comparison Of Glucometers Used In Hospitals And In Outpatient Settings With The Laboratory Reference Method In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Mumbai

(pdf) Comparison Of Glucometers Used In Hospitals And In Outpatient Settings With The Laboratory Reference Method In A Tertiary Care Hospital In Mumbai

Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism / 2013 / Vol 17 / Supplement 3 Diabetes Mellitus is a noncommunicable disease reaching epidemic proportions globally. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes show a direct relationship between the glycemic control and the risk of systemic complications. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) promotes selfmonitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) to allow diabetic patients to achieve and ADA recommends that all insulintreated patients perform SMBG to (a) achieve and maintain glycemic control, (b) prevent and detect hypoglycemia, (c) adjust changes in lifestyle. SMBG is also used in establishing the need for insulin therapy in gestational diabetes mellitus. With the introduction of glucometers, there has been an ongoing, competitiondriven development in both meter and strip technology, which has allowed for greater accuracy and reliability of results. However, despite the advances in technology, there is signicant variation among these monitoring devices, which has necessitated the development of performance guidelines by organizations such as the ADA[1,2] and the International Standardization Organization (ISO). The ISO guidelines recommend that the accuracy criteria for values <100 mg/dl to 10 mg/dl and 20% for values 100 mg/dl. However, the ADA recommends Corresponding Author: Dr. Girish M. Parmar, Department of Endocrinology, P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Medical Research Centre, Veer Savarkar Marg, Mahim, Mumbai 400 016, Maharashtra, India. Email: [email protected], [email protected] Comparison of glucometers used in hospitals and in outpatient settings with the laboratory reference method in a tertiary care hospital in Mumbai Aarti Ullal, Girish M. Parmar, Phulrenu H. Chauhan Department of Endocrinology, P.D. Hinduj Continue reading >>

Evaluation Of The Appropriateness Of Using Glucometers For Measuring The Blood Glucose Levels In Mice

Evaluation Of The Appropriateness Of Using Glucometers For Measuring The Blood Glucose Levels In Mice

Glucometers are also widely used in diabetes research conducted using animal models. However, the appropriateness of measuring blood glucose levels using glucometers in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the consistency between the blood glucose levels measured by 11 models of glucometers and plasma glucose levels measured by a laboratory biochemical test in blood samples collected by retro-orbital sinus puncture or tail-tip amputation. In both blood samples obtained by retro-orbital sinus puncture and those obtained by tail-tip amputation, 10 of the 11 models of glucometers yielded higher glucose values, while 1 yielded lower glucose values, than the plasma glucose values yielded by the laboratory test, the differences being in direct proportion to the plasma glucose values. Most glucometers recorded higher blood glucose levels after glucose loading and lower blood glucose levels after insulin loading in retro-orbital sinus blood as compared to tail vein blood. Our data suggest that the blood glucose levels measured by glucometers in mice tended to be higher than the plasma glucose levels yielded by the biochemical test under the hyperglycemic state, and that differences in the measured levels were observed according to the blood collection method depending on the glycemia status. Blood glucose is an essential parameter in the study of metabolism and diabetes. Blood glucose levels measured by laboratory biochemical testing are used for the diagnosis of diabetes and for therapeutic monitoring of diabetic patients1,2. Glucometers are used for strict self-monitoring of blood glucose levels (SMBG) by the patients themselves in intensive diabetes treatment. Experiments in animal models are critical to investigate the significances of the physiologica Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

One of the most frequent questions we get from our customers who purchase the iHealth Align Portable Glucometer or the iHealth Smart Wireless Glucometer is: How accurate are iHealths meters compared to other glucose meters on the market? Unfortunately, there is not a straightforward answer to this question, as no two meters will give you the same readings and a difference of even 20-30 points may be in the range of error. iHealth glucometers meet the most up-to-date FDA regulations and ISO standards, which state that over-the-counter home-use meters must be accurate within +/-15% compared to a formal lab measurement. This means that a person with a glucose level of 100 can read as low as 85 or as high as 115 and still be within the range of accuracy. According to the FDA and several clinical studies, many factors can determine the accuracy of your meter, including: interfering substances (Vitamin C, Tylenol, etc.) how well you perform the test. For example, you should wash and dry your hands before testing and closely follow the instructions for operating your meter. altitude, temperature, and humidity (High altitude, low and high temperatures, and humidity can cause unpredictable effects on glucose results). Check the meter manual and test strip package insert for more information. store and handle the meter and strips according to manufacturers instructions. It is important to store test strip vials closed and to make sure that you are not using expired strips to check your blood sugar. Rather than comparing meters to other meters to gauge accuracy, the FDA recommends using the three ways below to ensure that your meter is working properly: Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Compare Smart Glucometers With Our Interactive Tool

Compare Smart Glucometers With Our Interactive Tool

Compare smart glucometers with our interactive tool Non-invasive glucose monitoring is considered to be the holy grail of diabetes treatment.Many companies have tried and failed and diabetes patients still have no accurate alternatives totracking glucose bypiercing the skin.Diabetics usually do thisseveral times daily in order tomake decisions on diet, exercise and medication.Many diabetics still resort to loggingtheir results using pen and paper. While we are waiting for someone to come up with non-invasive glucose monitoring system, there are more high tech solutions fortracking a persons blood sugar levels. Disclaimer:Manufacturers may update tech specs of their devices over time. While we cannot guarantee that the information on Gadgets & Wearables tech specs pages is 100% correct, we promise to review this content regularly and do our best to bring you the most precise information. To be absolutely sure of tech specs of a particular device, we recommend checking the manufacturers website. Please note, Gadgets & Wearables may be compensated for certain links in the tech specs, but the price is the same for you. See our affiliate disclosure page for more details. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

How accurate is your blood glucose meter? A major study found that almost half of meters do not meet the minimum required standards: For blood sugars over 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 20%. For example, if your blood sugar is 200 mg (11 mmol), the meter must read between 160 (8.8 mmol) and 240 (13.3 mmol) at least 95% of the time. For blood sugars under 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 15 mg. For example, if your blood sugar is 60 mg (3.3 mmol), the meter must read between 45 (2.5 mmol) and 75 (4.2 mmol) at least 95% of the time. There is a new proposal that would require all results to be within 15%. But how do you know if your meter is meeting this standard? Today, there is no systematic verification of meter accuracy after it gets approved for sale. And as you will see below, many meters are sub-standard. This puts people relying on these tools in unnecessary danger. If you’re going to take a shot of insulin, a number that’s 15% off is a really big deal. Taking too much insulin can result in severe low blood sugars, hospitalization and even death. Comparison of Meter Accuracy The chart below is from System Accuracy Evaluation of 43 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose according to DIN EN ISO 15197 by Dr. Guido Freckmann and others published in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2012. Between 2009 and 2011, over a hundred people were recruited to test each of the meters listed below. The test strips were taken from at least seven different vials of one manufacturing lot. Over at least ten days, the patients tested their blood sugar with the meter and then a second sample was taken for analysis in a lab. Before using this data, it is important to know the limitations: The study only looked Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

These 10 meters varied in age and wear.Some were old, some were new one wasmy own personalmeter that I used to calibrate my CGM and make mission-criticaldecisions each day.All of them passed their respective control solution tests, so its safe to assume that they werein good working order. I tried to match the testing method employed by Chris (author of the original post ) as closely as possible. Eightrounds of testing were performed over the course of 24 hours according to the following procedure: Order of meters was randomized for each round. Tests were performed only when CGM readings were stable (i.e. no insulin on board and CGM showing a slope of ~0 mg/dL/min). I didnt do anything special to stabilize my blood glucose just tested as I went about a normal day. The test strips used for each meter all came from their own unique vials. Before and after completing the eight testing rounds, the meters were checked using their respective control solutions. They all passed the control solution tests. Unlike Chris, I didnt have an alarming spread in my results for any round. The overallbetween-meter variability (% Error, or %CV for you stats folks) was only 6%. In plain English:My treatment decisions wouldnt have varied much at all, regardless of the meter I was using. One unit of rapid-acting insulin brings my BG down by ~80 mg/dL, and I correct whenever Im over 100 mg/dL. Ill usually correct down to 70-110 mg/dL, depending on my plans for the next couplehours (big meal = correct to 70; workout = correct to 110). Iwasrelieved to see that even if I tooka correction bolus for the maximum BG of each round, I still would have been brought down to a desirableblood glucose level. For example, take Round 1. The highest reading I saw was 182 md/dL, and Id take 1 unit for that. Ev Continue reading >>

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