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Glucometer Without Pricking

My First Year With The Apple Watch As A Health-monitoring Tool

My First Year With The Apple Watch As A Health-monitoring Tool

Apple A version of this essay was originally published at Tech.pinions, a website dedicated to informed opinions, insight and perspective on the tech industry. We all know about the market for health trackers. But in my case, the Apple Watch has become an indispensable health monitor. I have been a type 2 diabetic for about 25 years and, until March of 2015, I was able to control it by diet, exercise and oral medications. But last March, when I was on a trip, my blood-sugar readings skyrocketed, and no amount of medication or diet would help. When I got home, I went to see my doctor, and he explained that, over time with many people, oral drugs cease to work, and they have to move to insulin. I had been fighting this move for the previous five years, but under the circumstances, I needed insulin to get my blood-sugar numbers under control. But the transition to using insulin was a difficult one. Getting the right amount based on carb counting and other factors was tough. I was pricking my fingers up to seven times a day to see what my blood sugars were. As a working person who travels a lot, doing this is just a bit difficult. With this new health-monitoring device and the Apple Watch, I have one of the most effective tools I have ever used to help me deal with this disease in a highly proactive manner. Over the last year, I have been very interested in the health-monitoring category of the watch. I have checked out things like the Withings blood-pressure cuff, where the results can be shown on the Apple Watch, and a new Apple Watch band that can record an EKG and display it on the watch. So I began to search to see if perhaps there was a blood-sugar monitoring system on the market, and discovered the Dexcom 5 Continuous Glucose Monitoring system. I was aware of the com Continue reading >>

Bloodless Glucometer Uses Light To Check Blood Sugar In 20 Seconds Or Less

Bloodless Glucometer Uses Light To Check Blood Sugar In 20 Seconds Or Less

When will diabetics in the U.S. get a bloodless glucometer that will allow them to check their blood sugar without a finger prick? The short answer is, we don’t know for sure. But a company that’s wrapped up initial testing of its bloodless glucometer and closed a series B round of financing thinks it has a good shot at becoming the “first noninvasive technology with a real shot at diagnostic accuracy,” in the words of its CEO. Grove Instruments’ Optical Bridge technology uses near-infrared spectroscopy to measure a person’s real-time blood sugar in less than 20 seconds. The company’s first product is an accessory-free, battery-operated personal glucose meter used on the fingertip or earlobe. Grove is one of several companies working on a noninvasive diabetes test using spectroscopy including DIRAmed, C8 MediSensors and InLight Solutions. Challenges in developing devices using this technique have included water interference and low signal-to-noise ratio, but Grove thinks it has developed solutions to these problems. “Yes, we work in near-infrared spectroscopy space, but our methodology and our particular construct is unique within the space,” said CEO Arthur Combs. “We have strong validation that we have unique technology.” That validation has come in the form of funding through 10 SBIR grants awarded by the NIDDK NIH and a loan from the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center Accelerator Program, Combs said. It’s also come in the form of results from a large study conducted last fall to test the device’s measurements against standard blood glucose determination. The company collected nearly 4,000 data pairs; the results, which are pending publication, indicate that the device was able to meet the ISO 15197 standard for accuracy, Combs said. Over th Continue reading >>

New: Blood Sugar Monitoring Without Needle Prick

New: Blood Sugar Monitoring Without Needle Prick

Engineers at Princeton University have developed a method to test blood sugar levels by means of a laser light that is capable of reading through the epidermal layer on the palm of the hand, eliminating the need to draw blood. "We are working hard to turn engineering solutions into useful tools for people to use in their daily lives," says senior researcher and electrical engineering professor Claire Gmachl. "With this work we hope to improve the lives of many diabetes sufferers who depend on frequent blood glucose monitoring." Alert: Doctors Using Magnesium to Reverse Diabetes According to researchers, the method is safe and rather than causing damage to skin cells, the light waves are partially absorbed in the body's sugar molecules and the level of absorption provides the reading. It's also accurate, says lead study author and electrical engineering graduate student Sabbir Liakat. In order to be useful, a glucose monitor must measure blood sugar levels within 20 percent accuracy and Liakat says this method is 84 percent accurate. "It works now but we are still trying to improve it," says Liakat, referring to the next step of paring down to portable size the bulky laboratory machine, which is likely a question of eliminating the need for its elaborate cooling system. While glucose monitoring by means of light waves is not a new concept, the key to the Princeton method is their success at maneuvering infrared waves. Current proposed methods like the Grove Instruments Optical Bridge employ near-infrared waves, which are not as accurate because they interact with many acids and chemicals in the skin in addition to sugar molecules. Prick-less methods for glucose monitoring, however, are developing rapidly and could soon become a reality. One such example is the much buzze Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

Say Goodbye To Finger Pricking!

Say Goodbye To Finger Pricking!

Non-Invasive Glucose Monitoring Most diabetes patients determine their blood glucose level with an outdated, decades-old procedure: Prick a finger, put a drop of blood on a test strip, and place the test strip in a glucometer that shows the blood sugar level. That all changes now. Our patented technology works with an invisible infrared light beam that looks into your skin and counts glucose molecules. This process is fast, painless, and cost-effective. You will be able to perform an unlimited amount of measurements and learn about your blood glucose level as it changes throughout the day and overnight. DiaMonTech makes managing diabetes much easier with the help of more frequent measurements. Our device family: A desktop device for clinical settings and multiple users and a compact pocket device for the end user. The band is a glimpse into the future: A watch-like device you can wear on your wrist that measures your glucose levels continuously. Each device can also communicate with your mobile phone so you can check your information any time and take immediate action. Designed For A Better Life Diabetes is a global challenge. More than 400 million people worldwide suffer from the disease. Our goal is to make checking your blood glucose level as easy as unlocking your phone. You will be able to get measurements throughout the day without pain or extra costs. Diabetologists suggest that more frequent blood glucose measurements can lead to better overall diabetes management and less diabetes-related illnesses. Until there’s a cure for diabetes, DiaMonTech can make living with it much easier. Available in... Shoebox-sized multi-user device for diabetologists and doctors’ offices. In preclinical tests, DiaMonTech achieved the same accuracy as tests strips. Pocket-sized Continue reading >>

Check Your Blood Glucose Levels Without Having To Prick Your Finger

Check Your Blood Glucose Levels Without Having To Prick Your Finger

Diabetic? Hate having to prick your finger so you test your blood sugar levels each day? We wouldn't blame you if you did, so that's why a new gizmo developed my scientists at Cardiff University's School of Engineering has us all intrigued. Blood glucose testing without the need for blood? Tell us more... Without the need for chemicals or any sort of invasive procedure, the remote control-esque device simply sticks to the skin and determines those all important levels via the medium of microwaves. "It will help with the management of the condition," commented one of its creators, prof Adrian Porch, in an interview with the BBC. "Conventional methods of monitoring blood glucose require the extraction of blood. Our device is non-invasive - it does not require the extraction of blood apart from the initial calibration." Worried about all those microwaves floating into your system while its testing your blood? No need to worry, prof Porch is quick to point out it's entirely safe to use. "It uses microwaves, but the levels are very, very low. Nowhere near the levels used in domestic cooking," he adds. While current results have proved positive, the team behind its creation will still need to put the monitor through another five years of testing before its considered ready for the mass market. Futuristic blood sugar monitors are nothing new though - earlier in the year a team from Seoul National University came up with a graphen patch that could check said levels and inject insulin all in one plaster-sized package. Why not check out: Surgeons can now 3D print cartilage with new 'BioPen' Continue reading >>

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

What tests can I use to check my blood sugar level? There are 2 blood tests that can help you manage your diabetes. One of these tests is called an A1C test, which reflects your blood sugar (or blood glucose) control over the past 2-3 months. Testing your A1C level every 3 months is the best way for you and your doctor to understand how well your blood sugar levels are controlled. Your A1C goal will be determined by your doctor, but it is generally less than 7%. The other test is called SMBG, or self-monitoring of blood glucose. Using a blood glucose monitor to do SMBG testing can help you improve control of your blood sugar levels. The results you get from an SMBG test can help you make appropriate adjustments to your medicine, diet and/or level of physical activity. Every person who has diabetes should have a blood glucose monitor (also called a home blood sugar meter, a glucometer, or a glucose meter) and know how to use it. Your doctor may prescribe a blood glucose monitor. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved meters that work without pricking your finger. But these meters cannot replace regular glucose meters. They are used to get additional readings between regular testing. What supplies do I need? You will need a glucose meter, alcohol pads, sterile finger lancets and sterile test strips. Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for these supplies. How do I pick a glucose meter? Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for your glucose meter. If so, your plan may only pay for a certain meter. If your insurance plan doesn’t pay for glucose meters, ask your doctor which meters he or she recommends. Shop around and compare costs. Consider what features are important to you. For example, some meters are Continue reading >>

Elpis Genesis - Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitor For Diabetics

Elpis Genesis - Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitor For Diabetics

A portable non-invasive blood glucose monitor - a finger placed in the sensor starts the test. In just 60 seconds, the test results are known and all data is recorded via Bluetooth onto your smartphone or tablet using our App. The Genesis can be used by multiple users and provides data on the following parameters: Hemoglobin Measurement (Hb) BENEFITS OF USING THE ELPIS GENESIS Painless Testing - No pain! The Genesis are non-invasive 100% pain-free blood glucose monitors that allow a user to monitor blood glucose levels WITHOUT the need to prick a finger. Safe and Accurate Testing - The Genesis tests for 5 parameters versus a strip monitor, which only provides only a blood glucose level. Compared to a hospital-grade automated biochemistry analyzer, the Genesis scored 88.4% accurate, which is higher than the traditional strip glucose meter's 85% accuracy and the non-invasive standard of 80% accuracy. Smart Testing - The Elpis Genesis App technology helps a user to fully manage his or her health lifestyle. Five health management indexes are displayed every time a test is complete. The App allows current and historical data to be stored for retrieval later. There is no need for the user to worry about forgetting or losing what was recorded yesterday. Economical Testing - The Genesis offers unlimited testing without the need for costly supplies (strips, lancets and alcohol swabs) so a user can test as often as desired without having to worry about the cost. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

A blood glucose meter is a small device that quickly measures and displays your blood glucose level. It's a great tool to help you self-monitor and manage your blood glucose. It gives you immediate results to make sure you're staying within your target range and allows you to quickly treat or react to low blood glucose levels if you're insulin dependent. Want to know how we get our review results? Check out how we test blood glucose meters. Blood glucose meter reviews Here we'll tell you: See our article for general information about diabetes. To check your blood glucose levels you'll need a blood glucose meter, lancet (finger-pricking) device and blood glucose testing strips. The process of taking a reading is quite simple. Generally all you'll need to do is: Insert the testing strip into the blood glucose meter Draw blood by inserting the lancet, loading and pricking your finger Place blood on the testing strip Take the reading You'll receive a reading in mmol/L (millimoles per litre of blood) – this is the international standard for measuring blood glucose levels. Depending on your type of diabetes and medication, you might need to check your levels at various times throughout the day (usually before meals, two hours after meals, before bed and before driving or exercise), but your health care professional will guide you on how often and when you should be checking your glucose levels. Once again your optimal blood glucose level/range will be determined by your doctor or health care professional. They determine this range by taking into consideration: the type of diabetes you have your age how long you've had diabetes the medication you take any other health conditions you have With each drop of blood your meter will give a different reading depending on when you'v Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Home Testing Your Cat’s Bg

Home Testing Your Cat’s Bg

Information provided about specific medical procedures or conditions is for educational purposes to allow for educated, on-going discussion with your vet and is not intended to replace veterinary advice. Diabetic Cat Care Buying a glucometer to home test your cat's BG truly is the MOST valuable weapon you have when it comes to fighting the war against FD, and the chance of reversing your cat's diabetes. While it may seem intimidating at first, it is an essential, non-negotiable requirement when it comes to TR. Without testing, you literally are "shooting blind"; meaning you have no idea if your cat even needs insulin or not. If your cat isn't yet on a low carb diet, "shooting blind" is almost guaranteed to be the number one reason behind unfortunate but preventable clinical hypos. By switching to a low carb wet diet following the Detox Process you'll make sure your cat is kept safe from clinical hypo if they've already started insulin. Once the detox process is over, the liver wakes up from being sucker punched by a high carb diet, and immediately the worry of clinical hypo is taken right off the table for otherwise healthy cats. Members on forum can help you understand which form of detox is most appropriate for your cat. Another very common situation when new members arrive at DCC is their cats are on pretty hefty prescribed doses of insulin, sometimes 6 to 7.0 units of insulin (or more) per shot. This tends to occur due to the belief most vets have that insulin lasts at least 12 hours in cats (which it doesn't). Home testing your cat's BG will confirm this to be true more often than not. In addition, the faith the veterinary community at large puts on a Fructosamine blood test is misplaced and is an indication the vet might not have a lot of experience when it comes Continue reading >>

Now, Keep A Check On Your Diabetes Without A Prick

Now, Keep A Check On Your Diabetes Without A Prick

Diabetics who are unhappy with the frequent pricks on the fingers to monitor glucose levels will find the new Flash Glucose Monitoring system (FGMS) device a painless way to manage the condition. On Wednesday, India became the first country globally where the professional version of wearable FGMS was launched. FGMS consists of a small, round sensor — slightly larger than Rs10 coin. The sensor, held in place with a self-adhesive pad, is placed on the back of the upper arm where it remains for 14 days. HT photo After this period, the patient is required to go back to the doctor, who uses a flash glucose monitoring reader to scan the sensor and download the glucose results that are stored in it — in as quickly as five seconds. “The beauty of device isn’t just that it does away with the finger pricks, but also the fact that it reads the glucose levels 24 hours a day for 14 days,” said Dr Shashank Joshi, endocrinologist, diabetologist and president of Association of Physicians of India. “It gives the doctor valuable insight into the pattern of sugar levels in the patient and accordingly design the care that a patient may need,” added Dr Joshi. The device records glucose levels every 15 minutes, capturing up to 130 glucose reading over the 14 days, thus giving a doctor comprehensive data of the patient. “The other glucose monitoring tools that are available right now provides glucose information for only points in real time glucose readings. Even when testing 6 times a day can miss high sugar attacks or low sugar attacks,” said Dr Joshi. The FGMS device has been manufactured by a pharmaceutical company in the United Kingdom. The device is currently available with endocrinologists and diabetologists in India. The reader, however, stays with the doctor, which Continue reading >>

What Makes Glucoshine™ Special?

What Makes Glucoshine™ Special?

Shaking Over Your Next Finger Prick? Using our photoplethysmography (PPG) technology, GlucoShine™ will measure and monitor your blood glucose levels without pricking your finger! GlucoShine™ is currently undergoing development, and we need your support to bring this device to you. Great news. Our development campaign is LIVE on Give.Asia! Every contribution will go a long way. Founder Alan Chan being interviewed by Dennis, the development staff of Give.Asia. Alan gives a succinct explanation of what GlucoShine™ is and how we’re going to utilise the generous support we’ve received. Satisfied With Pricking Yourself Every Day? The good thing about current finger pricking methods is that it allows diabetics to perform self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). The bad thing is despite the advancements, it will never erase the foundation of piercing one’s skin to extract blood. The thought of having a lancet piercing our skin and extracting our blood regularly can be daunting: the pain, the complexity, the possible adverse events, not to mention the hefty costs. Finger pricking is also very inconvenient for diabetics at work, especially when donned in suits and blouses. Studies have shown that the problems associated with current SMBG have been hindering compliance, hence quality of life and healthcare outcomes, in diabetics. On top of that, the trauma of finger pricking is also an impediment for pre-diabetics to monitor their blood glucose levels. With over 400 million diabetics in the world and growing, it is a burgeoning concern. Glucose Monitoring Should Be Painlessly Easy GlucoShine™ is a non-invasive self-measuring concept currently being developed by Alan Chan and his team of committed professionals, in an effort to relieve diabetic patients from the pain Continue reading >>

Abbott's Flash Glucose Monitor To Be Made Available On Nhs

Abbott's Flash Glucose Monitor To Be Made Available On Nhs

Abbott's FreeStyle Libre – a flash glucose monitor that allows diabetes patients to track their blood sugar without pricking – will be reimbursed by the NHS from 1 November, subject to local health economy approval. The device's starter pack previously cost around £170, with readers for the sensors costing as much as £60, but will now be available for reimbursement via the NHS across England and Wales, NHS Scotland and Health and Social Care in Northern Ireland for people with type 1 and 2 diabetes who are intensively-using insulin. The system uses a sensor the size of a £2 coin, worn on the back of the upper arm, to automatically read glucose levels. Clinical studies and real-world evidence have suggested that FreeStyle Libre users scan their glucose levels an average of at least 15 times per day, and that these higher rates of self-monitoring are strongly associated with improved glucose measures. Chris Askew, Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, said: “Today’s announcement is fantastic news: Not since the transition from urine testing to finger-prick testing has there been such potential to transform the lives of people living with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes through technology. “Flash glucose monitoring can free people living with diabetes from the pain and rigour of frequent finger-prick testing, and puts them in greater control of their condition. In doing so, it has the potential to help prevent a host of devastating long-term complications. Today’s decision is testament to the commitment of campaigners, clinicians and policy makers to making this technology available." He added: “The challenge now will be that everyone who could benefit from this technology is able to access it where they live; Diabetes UK will be looking to local decision makers to e Continue reading >>

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Needle-free Diabetes? European Medtech Inventions Which Painlessly Measure Blood Glucose!

Will the daily routine of finger pricking to monitor blood glucose levels finally come to an end for the millions worldwide living with diabetes? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disease that affects over 422 million people worldwide. It is the major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attack and stroke. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers it an epidemic and predicts it will become the 7th biggest cause of death worldwide by 2030. To monitor blood glucose levels, millions of diabetics have to test their blood sugar close to 10 times a day by pricking their finger with a lancet to obtain a small blood sample. But some companies in Europe are trying to find a pain-free alternative that removes the need for needles – here are three startups revolutionizing blood sugar testing. GlucoSense (London, UK) GlucoSense is a spin-out of the University of Leeds funded by NetScientific that is developing a non-invasive device based on photonics technology. Its basic component is a nano-engineered silica glass with ions that fluoresce in the infrared region when stimulated by a low power laser. When the glass is in contact with the user’s skin, the reflected fluorescence signal varies based on the concentration of glucose in their blood and one can acquire the glucose concentration measurement in less than 30 seconds. NovioSense (Nijmegen, the Netherlands) NovioSense is a Dutch startup working on an implantable glucose sensor that uses tear fluid to measure glucose levels. The device consists of a 15 mm-long metal coil coated with a hydrophilic gel. Its flexible form allows the device to bend to conform to the surface of the lower eye lid, where the sensor is placed. The coil moves to the correct place in the eye and the gel coating swells to increase conta Continue reading >>

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