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Glucometer Error Codes

Active Blood Glucose Meter Error Screens | Pakistan

Active Blood Glucose Meter Error Screens | Pakistan

The battery is empty or there is no battery in the meter. Insert a new battery. You will need one CR2032 type battery You have inserted the battery the wrong way round. Remove the battery and place it in the battery compartment as shown in the manual. The temperature may be too low. Ensure that the ambient temperature is +8 to +42 C (+46.4 F to +107.6 F) The meter may be defective. Contact (insert affiliate contact information here). The code chip has not been correctly inserted into the meter. Remove the code chip and re-insert it. There is no code chip in the meter. Insert the code chip that belongs to the Accu-Chek Active test strips you are currently using. You did not slide the test strip in correctly or completely. Hold the test strip so that the arrows printed on it and the green square face upwards. Without bending it, gently slide the test strip into the test strip guide in the direction of the arrows. You must feel the test strip lock into place. You slid a used test strip into the meter. You applied blood or control solution to the test strip too soon, i.e. before the drop symbol flashed on the display. Start the blood glucose test from the beginning with a new test strip. The measurement window is dirty. Clean the measurement window. Your blood glucose value may be very low. If you have typical symptoms of a very low blood glucose, immediately follow your healthcare professionals instructions for such cases. Repeat the test afterwards. You removed the test strip from the meter in order to apply blood and did not slide it back in it within 20 seconds. The test strip was bent or moved while testing was in progress. You applied too little blood or control solution to the test strip. You waited too long before applying a second drop of blood or control solution Continue reading >>

Trouble Shooting Your Glucose Meter

Trouble Shooting Your Glucose Meter

When people with diabetes can control their blood sugar (glucose), they are more likely to stay healthy. People with diabetes can use a number of tools to help them better manage their diabetes. One of these tools is a home glucose meter. Glucose meters help people with diabetes check their blood sugar at home, school, work, and play. Other blood and urine tests reveal trends in diabetes management and help identify diabetes complications. We are going to discuss the glucose meter (glucometer) and how it can help you control your diabetes. The process of monitoring one's own blood glucose with a glucose meter is often referred to as self-monitoring of blood glucose or "SMBG." To test for glucose with a typical glucose meter, place a small sample of blood on a disposable "test strip" and place the strip in the meter. The test strips are coated with chemicals that combine with glucose in blood. The meter measures how much glucose is present. Meters do this in different ways. Some measure the amount of electricity that can pass through the sample. Others measure how much light reflects from it. The meter displays the glucose level as a number. Several new models can record and store a number of test results. Some models can connect to personal computers to store test results or print them out. At least 25 different meters are commercially available. They differ in several ways including: Alternate testing sites (for example, using the forearm instead of a finger) Cost of the test strips used (Insurance companies will often cover the cost of testing strips for certain meters.contact your insurance for the best coverage.) Newer meters often have features that make them easier to use than older models. Some meters allow you to get blood from places other than your fingertip Continue reading >>

Trouble Shooting Your Glucose Meter

Trouble Shooting Your Glucose Meter

When people with diabetes can control their blood sugar (glucose), they are more likely to stay healthy. People with diabetes can use a number of tools to help them better manage their diabetes. One of these tools is a home glucose meter. Glucose meters help people with diabetes check their blood sugar at home, school, work, and play. Other blood and urine tests reveal trends in diabetes management and help identify diabetes complications. We are going to discuss the glucose meter (glucometer) and how it can help you control your diabetes. The process of monitoring one's own blood glucose with a glucose meter is often referred to as self-monitoring of blood glucose or "SMBG." To test for glucose with a typical glucose meter, place a small sample of blood on a disposable "test strip" and place the strip in the meter. The test strips are coated with chemicals that combine with glucose in blood. The meter measures how much glucose is present. Meters do this in different ways. Some measure the amount of electricity that can pass through the sample. Others measure how much light reflects from it. The meter displays the glucose level as a number. Several new models can record and store a number of test results. Some models can connect to personal computers to store test results or print them out. At least 25 different meters are commercially available. They differ in several ways including: Alternate testing sites (for example, using the forearm instead of a finger) Cost of the test strips used (Insurance companies will often cover the cost of testing strips for certain meters.contact your insurance for the best coverage.) Newer meters often have features that make them easier to use than older models. Some meters allow you to get blood from places other than your fingertip Continue reading >>

Meter Error Messages

Meter Error Messages

IMPORTANT: If you get repeated error messages and are experiencing symptoms of hypo or hyperglycemia, contact your healthcare professional immediately or dial 9-1-1 This could happen for the following reasons: If this message appears at the moment the test strip is inserted, the test strip may be wet or damaged. If the message appears during a test, the test strip may have been removed too early. Retest using a new test strip. If this message appears after the 1-2-3 countdown instead of a result, it may indicate you applied more blood after testing began. This could happen for the following reasons: The blood sample was put on the test strip before inserting the test strip. The correct steps are to first, insert the test strip into the meter, wait for the fill screen to appear, and then bring the bottom of the strip to the drop on the finger. The blood was "dropped" on the strip rather than touching the end of the strip to the edge of the blood drop to siphon it up in the strip. The lancet (needle) is dull and not puncturing deep enough. The lancing device needs to be set to a higher setting for a deeper puncture which will produce more blood. The higher the number setting, the deeper the puncture. The strip was pulled away from the blood sample before the test window was filled. The strip was close to or pushed against the skin on the finger, which can block the siphon door on the end of the strip. This has to be clear for pulling the blood up. This could happen for the following reasons: The test strip may have been improperly stored (e.g., hot, humid conditions) or may be expired. The test strip may have been mishandled by vigorous bending or shaking. Retest using a new test strip. Parts of the test strip may have become covered in grease, oil, or lotion. Retest usi Continue reading >>

Alphatrak

Alphatrak

AlphaTRAK Blood Glucose Monitoring System is a system of diagnostic tools used to measure the levels of glucose in the blood of diabetic dogs and cats. The system consists of the AlphaTRAK 2 meter, easy-wicking test strips, lancing device, lancets and control test solution. What is the difference between AlphaTRAK and AlphaTRAK 2 is the name of the blood glucose meter included in the AlphaTRAK Blood Glucose Monitoring System. AlphaTRAK 2 is the second generation and most current AlphaTRAK meter and the only one in production. AlphaTRAK 2 is the blood glucose monitor used and prescribed the most among veterinarians. AlphaTRAK is calibrated for dogs and cats and accounts for the differences in the blood makeup of different species. Results are accurate, easy to obtain from the comfort of home and available quickly. Sometimes, pet owners choose to use human blood glucose meters instead of a pet glucometer. Human meters are created and calibrated for measuring the concentration of glucose in a human's blood. When a human blood glucose meter is used for a dog or cat, it assumes human blood composition to calculate glucose levels. This can result in underestimation of blood glucose concentrations and inaccurate readings. The AlphaTRAK 2 meter, AlphaTRAK Starter Kit and AlphaTRAK supplies, such as lancets and test strips, are available for purchase from your veterinarian or one of these authorized online retailers: We can also help you find a veterinarian near you . What are the differences between a human and a pet glucose meter? Blood glucose meters intended for human use are calibrated to detect glucose in human blood. The way glucose is distributed in human blood differs greatly from the way it is distributed in the blood of dogs and cats. Human meters do not account for Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

How To Use The Assure Platinum Blood Glucose Meter

How To Use The Assure Platinum Blood Glucose Meter

The Assure Platinum Blood Glucose Monitor is one of the most effective auto-code meters available on the market for home and facility testing. Designed for multi-resident use, the Platinum is a top choice in long term care facilities for diabetes management. Using the Assure Platinum to test Blood Glucose Levels Remove a test strip from the bottle and replace the cap immediately. Insert the new test strip into the top of the meter, contact bars first. Verify the strip and flashing blood drop indicator are displayed. Lance the fingertip or alternate site and apply a drop of blood to the strip. Make sure the blood is applied within 20 seconds of lancing. The meter will show a ""7"" and count down. If no ""7"" appears replace the strip and restart procedure. After 7 seconds the result will show on the screen. Turn the meter upside-down and press the test strip release button The meter will automatically power down when the strip is removed. Using the Assure Platinum to Perform a Control Solution Test Insert a new test strip as if performing a blood glucose test. Ensure test strip and flashing blood drop indicator are displayed. Press the forward or back button to enter control solution mode. A control solution bottle indicator should be shown. Mix the control solution and discard the first drop. Place the second drop of control solution on the clean bottle cap. Bring the test strip in the meter to the solution. Check the result against the acceptable ranges on the test strip bottle. Do not use the system of the results are out of range. Repeat with new strip and second control solution. Understanding the Assure Platinum Glucose Monitor Messages ""PCS"" or a Bell-shaped icon signals the need for a control solution test. ""LO"" Displays if the result is below 20 mg/dL ""HI"" Continue reading >>

Error E-9 On Accu-chek Aviva

Error E-9 On Accu-chek Aviva

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I keep getting this error message on my meter when trying to test and cant find my booklet. Does anyone know what this means? If i am not mistaken, the e-9 error are the batteries getting low. You'll probably find the manual on-line : The battery is almost out of power. Change the battery now. See Chapter 5, Changing the Battery. Oh thanx buddy, I just bought 100 strips off Amazon so I was worried and don't want to go through the hassle. I haven't replaced the battery since I got the meter so I guess its time. Phew... now I feel better. Is your ACCU-CHEK Aviva working now? Did you replace the battery? I'm using that monitor also. Oh thanx buddy, I just bought 100 strips off Amazon so I was worried and don't want to go through the hassle. I haven't replaced the battery since I got the meter so I guess its time. Phew... now I feel better. Let me start by saying that I'm not meter bashing here but........I received an Aviva in the mail. I've tried to use it several times and keep getting a code error (don't remember the number). According to the website, the code means that my bg is too low to check. Funny thing is, when I checked with my US, my readings were in the 90-120 range. I've thought of sending it back but I'm not sure I would feel safe using this particular meter. I'm gonna stick with my One Touch meters. That's exactly what I did, and now mine works... I'm using a Performa Nano here in OZ. This error just popped up for me on Sunday evening....to tell me that my battery was dead...and then the unit shut down. No warning. Just the beep and off. Before I'm told, "you should buy back up b Continue reading >>

Error Code 0 True Metrix Meter

Error Code 0 True Metrix Meter

this is what the pharmacy give my mom for her testing, since she is on medicare. she has been having a terrible time with it. More than 50% of the time, she get's an E-0 message on the meter. I've searched the internet, with no luck as to what Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy There should have been an instruction booklet in the box. If you no longer have it, call the manufacturer (e-mail) and ask for an instruction manual. "Invalid hematocrit"? That's an odd error message. It doesn't say what's wrong (high or low/ not enough sample blood, meter problem? to me, it implies something wrong with the blood sample), if it's your fault or the meter's fault, or if you need to be concerned. Medicare pays for all different types of strips. I use a Bayer Contour USB meter and the only time I ever get an error message is when I put too little blood on the strip. does your mom use a Medicare Advantage Plan or does she use original Medicare. You can call them and they will tell you what strips they cover. She should not use a meter that is difficult to use. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. Continue reading >>

No-coding Strategies For Glucose Monitors: Miscoding And Other User Errors: Importance Of Ongoing Education For Proper Blood Glucose Monitoring Procedures

No-coding Strategies For Glucose Monitors: Miscoding And Other User Errors: Importance Of Ongoing Education For Proper Blood Glucose Monitoring Procedures

Copyright 2008 Diabetes Technology Society This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. This article reviews the literature to date and reports on a new study that documented the frequency of manual code-requiring blood glucose (BG) meters that were miscoded at the time of the patient's initial appointment in a hospital-based outpatient diabetes education program. Between January 1 and May 31, 2007, the type of BG meter and the accuracy of the patient's meter code (if required) and procedure for checking BG were checked during the initial appointment with the outpatient diabetes educator. If indicated, reeducation regarding the procedure for the BG meter code entry and/or BG test was provided. Of the 65 patients who brought their meter requiring manual entry of a code number or code chip to the initial appointment, 16 (25%) were miscoded at the time of the appointment. Two additional problems, one of dead batteries and one of improperly stored test strips, were identified and corrected at the first appointment. These findings underscore the importance of checking the patient's BG meter code (if required) and procedure for testing BG at each encounter with a health care professional or providing the patient with a meter that does not require manual entry of a code number or chip to match the container of test strips (i.e., an autocode meter). Keywords: autocode, autocoded blood glucose meter, blood glucose, blood glucose meter, manual code, miscoded meter, patient education, user error Persons newly diagnosed with diabetes who are attending diabetes education classes are dealing with mixed emotions as they participate in discussions regarding food planning, benefits of exercise, actions and side effects of medications, how and when to complete blood glucose (BG Continue reading >>

Active Error Screens | Accu-chek

Active Error Screens | Accu-chek

The battery is empty or there is no battery in the meter. Insert a new battery. You will need one CR2032 type battery You have inserted the battery the wrong way round. Remove the battery and place it in the battery compartment as shown in the manual. The temperature may be too low. Ensure that the ambient temperature is +8 to +42 C (+46.4 F to +107.6 F) The meter may be defective. Contact (insert affiliate contact information here). The code chip has not been correctly inserted into the meter. Remove the code chip and re-insert it. There is no code chip in the meter. Insert the code chip that belongs to the Accu-Chek Active test strips you are currently using. You did not slide the test strip in correctly or completely. Hold the test strip so that the arrows printed on it and the green square face upwards. Without bending it, gently slide the test strip into the test strip guide in the direction of the arrows. You must feel the test strip lock into place. You slid a used test strip into the meter. You applied blood or control solution to the test strip too soon, i.e. before the drop symbol flashed on the display. Start the blood glucose test from the beginning with a new test strip. The measurement window is dirty. Clean the measurement window. Your blood glucose value may be very low. If you have typical symptoms of a very low blood glucose, immediately follow your healthcare professionals instructions for such cases. Repeat the test afterwards. You removed the test strip from the meter in order to apply blood and did not slide it back in it within 20 seconds. The test strip was bent or moved while testing was in progress. You applied too little blood or control solution to the test strip. You waited too long before applying a second drop of blood or control solution Continue reading >>

Contour Next One Error Codes

Contour Next One Error Codes

An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) An explanation and trouble shooting for the error code (s) The company that brings you Contour products has a new name. Introducing Ascensia Diabetes Care. 2920 Matheson Blvd East, Mississauga, Ontario, L4W 5R6 Tel: 1-800-268-7200 Ascensia, the Ascensia Diabetes Care logo, Contour, Microlet, Glucofacts, the No Coding logo, and Second-Chance are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Ascensia Diabetes Care Holdings AG. Apple and the Apple logo are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc. The Bluetooth word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc., and any use of such marks by Ascensia Diabetes Care is under license. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. For a full list of trademarks click here . Last Updated March 2017 Continue reading >>

What Causes A Test Strip Error On My Meter?

What Causes A Test Strip Error On My Meter?

Glucose meters display error messages when there are problems with test strips, problems with the glucose meter, or when your glucose level is higher or lower than normal. One of the common errors is the test strip error. This error is often an easy fix. However, it’s important to understand the test strip error so you can prevent it from happening again in the future. Every time a test strip error occurs you will need to repeat the test with a new test strip. This often results in use of a few test strips which can become costly over time. Test Strip Error First and foremost, make sure you are using the right test strip with your meter. Using test strips that are incompatible with your meter often causes an error. If you’re not sure which test strips to use with your meter, contact the manufacturer. Here are a few common test strip errors: High or Low Operating Temperature: your glucose meter may display a test strip error when the it detects that the temperature is above or below the operating range. Do not perform a test until the meter and test strips reach a temperature within the operating range of your glucose monitoring system. Used, Damaged, or Expired Test Strip: glucose test strips are for single use. Do not use expired, short-dated, used, or damaged test strips. In this case, repeat the test with a new strip. Always read the safety instructions provided in the test strip box. Keep your strips in their original packages and away from heat, humidity and sunlight. Do not leave them open to air because that will make the strip unusable. When you remove a test strip for use, place a clean cloth underneath it in case you drop it; this way it will still be clean and usable. Always dispose used test strips and never use them again. You may also get a test strip Continue reading >>

Accu-chek Aviva Meter Error Screens | Accu-chek

Accu-chek Aviva Meter Error Screens | Accu-chek

Extreme temperatures. Move the meter to a more temperate area. If you see 3 dashes or hyphens, the meter is not coded or the code key is not inserted. Turn off the meter and make sure the code key is properly inserted. If this does not fix the problem, please contact Accu-Chek Customer Care . A battery icon means the battery power is low. Change the battery soon. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 7, "Changing the Batteries." A battery icon means the battery power is low. Change the battery soon. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 5, "Changing the Battery." "Set-up" means the meter is in the set-up mode, waiting for you to change or confirm settings. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 5, "Using the Set-Up Mode." "Set" means the meter is in set mode, waiting for you to change or confirm settings. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Meter Setup." If you see "code exp," the test strips expire at the end of the current month. Make sure the time and date in the meter are correct. If this does not fix the problem, please contact Accu-Chek Customer Care . If a test strip icon is flashing, the meter is ready for you to insert a test strip. If you see a blood drop and test strip, the meter is ready for a drop of blood or control solution. If you see the letters HI, your blood glucose may be higher than the measuring range of the system. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Unusual Blood Glucose Results." If you see the letters LO, your blood glucose may be lower than the measuring range of the system. Download the owner's booklet now and refer to Chapter 4, "Unusual Blood Glucose Results." A star or asterisk means a marker was assigned to this test result. A star or asterisk mean Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is Hard: A Humbling Experience With Er5

Diabetes Is Hard: A Humbling Experience With Er5

Diabetes is hard: A humbling experience with Er5 I dont have diabetes. But I do think about diabetes a lot, read about diabetes a lot, and certainly talk about diabetes a lot. So, this past week, I decided it was time to walk the walk. I opened up a shiny package for a new glucometer with the plan of monitoring my glucose 3 or 4 times a day for several days. I actually read the instruction manual on how to properly set the time and date, and did so within a few minutes. As long as I was going to do this, I at least wanted my data to be accurate, a true quantified-self experiment (of course, choosing a night where I went out for a hamburger and fries was a true test of my pancreas abilities!). Then, like a know-it-all physician, I tried to check my sugar. Er5 said the screen. Hmmm. Did it again. Punched hole #2 in my finger. Ouch. Er5. Maybe I didnt get a big enough drop of blood. So, I cranked up the dial on the lancet device from 3 to 9 so I could get the deepest finger puncture and guarantee a burgundy nugget for the test strip. This time, ouch out loud. Er5 on the screen again. I did this several times, howling in pain down the hall of my apartment, and said to my fiancee, this hurts! I cant believe I ask people to check their sugar multiple times a day! And worse, I cant even do it right! At this point, I figured the test strips must be defective so I googled Er5 onetouch ultramini to see what was going wrong. I didnt have another vial of test strips so I was hopeful that test strip damage was not my issue. If it was, my experiment would be over rather quickly. I had to read a little further to find out that an incompletely filled confirmation window actually means, you are not putting the blood on the test strip properly. It turns out, rather than placing the drop Continue reading >>

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