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Glucometer Comparison

Accu-chek Meter Comparison Review

Accu-chek Meter Comparison Review

Accu-Chek meters by Roche have been a trusted brand name in glucometers since the 1980’s. They’re known for their ease of use and accuracy, both are very important when it comes to testing and recording your blood glucose levels. Accu-Chek currently has six different types of meters available for consumers. But how do you know which one is the best fit for you? They offer meters that are small and compact for on the go diabetics, meters with backlit screens to make reading your numbers easier, and even meters for the tech savvy that connect to the user’s smartphone via Bluetooth technology. Let’s take a look at Accu-Chek’s six different meters to find which one suits you best. Accu-Chek Guide The Accu-Chek Guide is perfect for those newly diagnosed with diabetes. It retails for $29.99 at your local pharmacy (we priced the Guide at CVS). The price includes: your meter, SmartPack test strip vial with starter test strips, a small bottle of control solution, 2-coin cell batteries, USB cable to connect your meter to a PC, and the Accu-Chek FastClix lancing device. The Guide meter kit is perfect for newbies. According to Accu-Chek’s website, 88% of users said it was easier to remove a single test strip from the SmartPack vial than a traditional round vial. A backlit LCD screen displays a clear reading during the day and at night. There is also a strip port light to make testing in poor lighting easier. Results appear quickly, less than 4 seconds. Another great feature is the Guide’s push-button strip ejector. The user doesn’t have to worry about touching a used strip, simply push a button and eject the used strip into the trash. The Guide meter can store 720 readings on the actual device and unlimited readings when you connect to the Accu-Chek Connect app. You Continue reading >>

Comparing The Accuracy Of My Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing The Accuracy Of My Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing the Accuracy of My Blood Glucose Meters I was first introduced to the One Touch Verio IQ when I began using an Animas insulin pump in May 2016. The sales rep gave me a rave review of this blood glucose meter, telling me that it was one of the most accurate on the market. This meter had also been recommended for calibrating readings on a Dexcom system, which is often considered the golden child of continuous glucose monitoring in the diabetes community. At the time, I was quite happy with my FreeStyle Insulinx and had no intention of switching. However, the Verio was quite a good looking meter and certainly more modern than any of the other devices I was using. So, I ended up placing it in my travel case and decided that I would use it as my spare. As wonderful as the encasing, color screen, and rechargeable batteries were, my biggest deal breaker in using this meter was its accuracy. I have consistently found that the One Touch Verio reads at least 0.5mmol/L (9mg/dL), if not 1mmol/L (18mg/dL) higher than each of my other blood glucose meters. There have been times where Ive felt lows coming on, only to check my blood sugar using the Verio and still see a reading within range. From my personal experience, this is not a meter that I can trust. To be fair, all blood glucose meters will only be accurate to the nearest 1mmol/L (9mg/dL) of a laboratory result. Which explains why two simultaneous blood glucose checks will likely produce two different results. Most blood glucose meters must have a Mean Absolute Relative Distance (MARD) within 15 to 20 per cent of laboratory results. This standard deems these devices a reliable indicator of blood glucose levels and safe to dose insulin from. Which blood glucose meter can I trust? I conducted my own experiment of sorts Continue reading >>

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining the Accuracy of Your Glucose Meter By Gary Gilles | Reviewed by Joel Forman, MD BSIP/UIG/Universal Images Group/Getty Images If you're like most people with diabetes , you probably assume that your glucose meter gives you accurate readings every time you check your blood. You base your insulin dose , food intake, and activity plans off that number. Fortunately, most glucose meters are well designed and give reasonably accurate test results. But there are some things you should know about your glucose meter to help you make the most educated decisions about your diabetes management. If youve ever taken your blood sugar twice or three times in a row without any delay in between tests, youve probably noticed that you dont get the same exact number each time. That doesnt mean your meter isnt operating correctly. It does, though, reflect the variance that is built into each meter. Within the medical community, home blood glucose meters are considered clinically accurate if the result is within 20 percentof what a lab test would indicate. For example, if your glucose meter result was 100 mg/dL, it could vary on the downside to 80 mg/dL or on the upside to 120 mg/dL and still be considered clinically accurate. Your Glucose Meter Measures Blood Differently Than the Lab All blood glucose meters use whole blood to measure glucose . Whole blood is simply a blood sample that contains the red blood cells. In a lab glucose test, only the plasma portion of the blood is used to measure glucose levels; the red blood cells are removed. Whole blood glucose test results are approximately 12 percentlower than the lab plasma results. But there is a way to compare the lab result with your meter. Before you do that, first you need to learn more about your meter. Your Meter Is Cali Continue reading >>

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

One of the most frequent questions we get from our customers who purchase the iHealth Align Portable Glucometer or the iHealth Smart Wireless Glucometer is: How accurate are iHealths meters compared to other glucose meters on the market? Unfortunately, there is not a straightforward answer to this question, as no two meters will give you the same readings and a difference of even 20-30 points may be in the range of error. iHealth glucometers meet the most up-to-date FDA regulations and ISO standards, which state that over-the-counter home-use meters must be accurate within +/-15% compared to a formal lab measurement. This means that a person with a glucose level of 100 can read as low as 85 or as high as 115 and still be within the range of accuracy. According to the FDA and several clinical studies, many factors can determine the accuracy of your meter, including: interfering substances (Vitamin C, Tylenol, etc.) how well you perform the test. For example, you should wash and dry your hands before testing and closely follow the instructions for operating your meter. altitude, temperature, and humidity (High altitude, low and high temperatures, and humidity can cause unpredictable effects on glucose results). Check the meter manual and test strip package insert for more information. store and handle the meter and strips according to manufacturers instructions. It is important to store test strip vials closed and to make sure that you are not using expired strips to check your blood sugar. Rather than comparing meters to other meters to gauge accuracy, the FDA recommends using the three ways below to ensure that your meter is working properly: Continue reading >>

Journal Of Avian Medicine And Surgery

Journal Of Avian Medicine And Surgery

Biochemical analysis is necessary for diagnosis and monitoring of diseases in birds; however, the small volume of blood that can be safely obtained from small avian species often limits laboratory diagnostic testing. Consequently, a suitable methodology requiring only a small volume of blood must be used. This study was designed to compare blood glucose concentrations in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) as measured by a commercial, handheld, human glucometer and a standard autoanalyzer. During the first phase of the study, whole blood samples obtained from 30 domestic pigeons were used to measure the blood glucose concentration with a glucometer, the packed cell volume (PCV), and the total erythrocyte count (nRBC). Plasma separated from the each sample was then used to obtain the plasma glucose concentration with the autoanalyzer. During the second phase of the study, 30 pigeons were assigned to 2 equal groups (n = 15). Hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia was induced in each group by intravenous injection of insulin or glucose, respectively. Blood was collected and processed, and glucose concentrations, PCV, and nRBC were measured as previously described. Linear-regression models demonstrated a significant relationship between results measured by the glucometer and autoanalyzer results from normoglycemic (correlation coefficient [R] = 0.43, P = .02), hypoglycemic (R = 0.95; P < .001), and hyperglycemic (R = 0.81; P < .001) birds. The results of this study suggest that we can predict the real blood-glucose concentration of pigeons by using results obtained by a glucometer. Continue reading >>

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of one investigational Bayer Blood Glucose meter (with investigational Bayer test strips) and four Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems from other companies. All meter BG results were compared with plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method (YSI Glucose Analyzer). Performance of the five systems was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMSs using capillary blood. All testing and lancing were performed by study staff and some blood samples were glycolyzed to lower the glucose levels. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 146 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Diagnostic Official Title: Evaluation of Blood Glucose Meter Systems - NACT Study Study Start Date : March 2012 Primary Completion Date : March 2012 Study Completion Date : March 2012 Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Study Staff Test BGMSs All testing and lancings were performed by the study staff; subjects did not perform any lancing or self-testing in this study. Study Staff lanced the fingers of subjects and tested the blood samples using five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems(BGMS): FreeStyle Freedom Lite® BGMS; ACCU-CHEK® Aviva BGMS; TRUEtrack® BGMS; OneTouch® Ultra®2 BGMS; CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS. Device: CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS Study staff performed Blood Glucose (BG) testing with capillary fingerstick blood collected from subjects with diabetes and without diabetes (up to 10% of subjects without diabetes were included). Performance of CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMs. All meter BG results were compared with capillary plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method ( Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Capillary And Venous Blood Glucose Levels Using Glucometer And Laboratory Blood Glucose Level In Poisoned Patients Being In Coma.

Comparison Of Capillary And Venous Blood Glucose Levels Using Glucometer And Laboratory Blood Glucose Level In Poisoned Patients Being In Coma.

Poisoning is one of the most common medical presentations in a hospital. Hypoglycemic patients are at increased risk of toxicity. The purpose of this study was to compare capillary blood glucose and venous blood glucose measurements using glucometer against laboratory blood glucose in case of poisoned patients being in coma.During the 6-month study period, a random sample of 98 patients was admitted in the Department of Poisoning Emergency and Clinical Toxicology of Noor Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran from May 2010. Data collected included age, gender, poisoning reason, vital signs, and Glasgow Coma Scale. Capillary blood samples were obtained from the fourth fingertip of the non-dominant hand. t-Test, paired t-test, Pearson's correlation analysis, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for analysis.The mean of capillary blood glucose was 115.7 50.2, of venous blood glucose measured by glucose meter was 117.8 47.3, and of glucose measured in vitro was 115.8 55.1. Mean of blood glucose showed no significant difference with the three mentioned methods. The correlation between capillary and intravenous blood glucose samples measured by glucometer was 0.93, between capillary blood glucose and in vitro measured venous blood glucose was 0.78, and between venous blood glucose measured by glucose meter and in vitro measured sample was 0.81. The mean of capillary and venous blood glucose levels measured by glucose meter, capillary and venous blood glucose levels measured in vitro, and venous blood glucose levels measured by glucose meter had no significant differences.Using venous blood sample and measuring the glucose level in it by glucometer is an acceptable and advisable method, and capillary blood glucose measurement by using glucometer Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Comparison Of Continuous Glucose Monitoring Between Dexcom G4 Platinum And Hd-xg Systems In Nonhuman Primates (macaca Fascicularis)

Timely knowing glucose level helps diabetic patients to manage the disease, including decisions about food, physical activity and medication. This study compared two continuous glucose monitoring systems in conscious and moving-free nonhuman primates (NHPs, Macaca fascicularis). Each normoglycemic or diabetic monkey was implanted with one Dexcom G4 Platinum subcutaneously or one HD-XG glucose sensor arterially for glucose monitoring. The glucose levels measured by both telemetry devices significantly correlated with the glucometer readings. The data of oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) showed that the glucose levels measured by either Dexcom G4 Platinum or HD-XG transmitter were very similar to glucometer readings. However, compared to HD-XG transmitter or glucometer, Dexcom G4 Platinum detected a decreased glucose peak of ivGTT with approximately 10 min delay due to interstitial glucose far behind blood glucose change. Our data showed the advantages of the telemetry systems are: (1) consecutive data collection (day and night); (2) no bleeding; (3) no anesthesia (moving freely); (4) recording natural response without physical restriction and stress; (5) less labor intensity during ivGTT and other tests; (6) quick outcomes without lab tests. This article summarized and compared the differences of the general characteristics of two continuous glucose monitoring systems in diabetic research. Dysfunctional carbohydrate metabolism without treatment eventually leads to diabetes which significantly impacts on the quality of patient life. Potential new therapies and technologies may help to improve the quality of life beyond current standard of care and perhaps even to cure the disease in future1, 2. Various animal models have been used in research for understanding the diseas Continue reading >>

An Evaluation And Comparison Of Reflolux Ii And Glucometer Ii, Two New Portable Reflectance Meters For Capillary Blood Glucose Determination - Sciencedirect

An Evaluation And Comparison Of Reflolux Ii And Glucometer Ii, Two New Portable Reflectance Meters For Capillary Blood Glucose Determination - Sciencedirect

Volume 4, Issue 3 , 19 February 1988, Pages 177-181 An evaluation and comparison of Reflolux II and Glucometer II, two new portable reflectance meters for capillary blood glucose determination Author links open overlay panel Gary M.Schier Get rights and content The Reflolux II and the Glucometer II, two new battery-operated portable reflectance meters (PRMs) for blood glucose measurement have been evaluated for accuracy, precision and ease of operation. Both PRMs are pocket-size and simple to use. The calibration of the two instruments is fundamentally different, but in both cases the calibration data are provided with the reagent test strips and require minimal operator participation. The analysis time is 50 s for the Glucometer II and 120 s for the Reflolux II. The Reflolux II has a measuring range of 0.527.7 mmol/l, which is superior to the 222 mmol/l range of Glucometer II. Both PRMs had excellent correlation (r > 0.97) and minimal bias when compared by regression analysis to a laboratory method on capillary and whole blood samples. The precision of the Reflolux II was marginally better than the Glucometer II with coefficients of variation less than 6.57% for the Glucometer II and less than 5.21% for the Reflolux II. Neither the Reflolux II nor the Glucometer II offer significant advantages one over the other, both are adequate for their designed use, and both are distinct improvements over their predecessors. Continue reading >>

Comparison Of A Human Portable Glucometer And An Automated Chemistry Analyzer For Measurement Of Blood Glucose Concentration In Pet Ferrets (mustela Putorius Furo).

Comparison Of A Human Portable Glucometer And An Automated Chemistry Analyzer For Measurement Of Blood Glucose Concentration In Pet Ferrets (mustela Putorius Furo).

Type: research-article, Evaluation Studies, Journal Article This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, -0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, -2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species. Continue reading >>

Accuracy Of Sensocard Glucose Meter: Comparing With Reference Glucose Oxidase Method

Accuracy Of Sensocard Glucose Meter: Comparing With Reference Glucose Oxidase Method

Muluken Kassahun, Tadele Melak and Molla Abebe* Department of Clinical Chemistry, School of Biomedical and Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia Corresponding Author : Molla Abebe Lecturer in the Department of Clinical Chemistry University of Gondar, Po.Box: 196, Gondar, Ethiopia Tel: +251913329707 E-mail: [email protected] Received August 01, 2014; Accepted August 28, 2014; Published August 31, 2014 Citation: Kassahun M, Melak T, Abebe M (2014) Accuracy of Sensocard Glucose Meter: Comparing with Reference Glucose Oxidase Method. J Med Diagn Meth 3:162. doi:10.4172/2168-9784.1000162 Copyright: © 2014 Kassahun M, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Medical Diagnostic Methods Abstract Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a cause of morbidity, disability and mortality worldwide. Glucose measurement by glucose meter is one of the diagnosing and monitoring tools of diabetes mellitus. However, the accuracy of this instrument is in question. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of SensoCard glucose meter comparing with reference glucose oxidase method at University of Gondar Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in March, 2014. A total of 122 (equal number of type 1 and II) diabetic mellitus patients were selected by consecutive sampling technique. Glucose value was determined by SensoCard glucose meter and reference glucose oxidase method. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 2 Continue reading >>

Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Corresponding author: Division of Science, School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, UK. Tel: +44 1382 308494. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Kimberley A. Bennett, Lucy M. Turner, Sebastian Millward, Simon E. W. Moss, Ailsa J. Hall; Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals, Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Glucose is an important metabolic fuel and circulating levels are tightly regulated in most mammals, but can drop when body fuel reserves become critically low. Glucose is mobilized rapidly from liver and muscle during stress in response to increased circulating cortisol. Blood glucose levels can thus be of value in conservation as an indicator of nutritional status and may be a useful, rapid assessment marker for acute or chronic stress. However, seals show unusual glucose regulation: circulating levels are high and insulin sensitivity is limited. Accurate blood glucose measurement is therefore vital to enable meaningful health and physiological assessments in captive, wild or rehabilitated seals and to explore its utility as a marker of conservation relevance in these animals. Point-of-care devices are simple, portable, relatively cheap and use less blood compared with t Continue reading >>

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

Comparison between glucometer and chemical analyzer for measuring blood glucose of diabetic patients strict warning: Non-static method view::load() should not be called statically in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/views.module on line 842. strict warning: Declaration of content_handler_field::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/cck/includes/views/handlers/content_handler_field.inc on line 208. strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_validate() should be compatible with views_handler::options_validate($form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589. strict warning: Declaration of views_handler_filter::options_submit() should be compatible with views_handler::options_submit($form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/handlers/views_handler_filter.inc on line 589. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_style_default::options() should be compatible with views_object::options() in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_style_default.inc on line 25. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_validate() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_validate(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135. strict warning: Declaration of views_plugin_row::options_submit() should be compatible with views_plugin::options_submit(&$form, &$form_state) in /home4/vibu/public_html/journalcra.com/sites/all/modules/views/plugins/views_plugin_row.inc on line 135. strict warning: Non- Continue reading >>

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

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