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Glucometer Comparison

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

Comparison Between Glucometer And Chemical Analyzer For Measuring Blood Glucose Of Diabetic Patients

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Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining Accurate Glucose Measurements From Wild Animals Under Field Conditions: Comparing A Hand Held Glucometer With A Standard Laboratory Technique In Grey Seals

Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Corresponding author: Division of Science, School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Abertay University, Dundee DD1 1HG, UK. Tel: +44 1382 308494. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Marine Biology and Ecology Research Centre Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Kimberley A. Bennett, Lucy M. Turner, Sebastian Millward, Simon E. W. Moss, Ailsa J. Hall; Obtaining accurate glucose measurements from wild animals under field conditions: comparing a hand held glucometer with a standard laboratory technique in grey seals, Conservation Physiology, Volume 5, Issue 1, 1 January 2017, cox013, Glucose is an important metabolic fuel and circulating levels are tightly regulated in most mammals, but can drop when body fuel reserves become critically low. Glucose is mobilized rapidly from liver and muscle during stress in response to increased circulating cortisol. Blood glucose levels can thus be of value in conservation as an indicator of nutritional status and may be a useful, rapid assessment marker for acute or chronic stress. However, seals show unusual glucose regulation: circulating levels are high and insulin sensitivity is limited. Accurate blood glucose measurement is therefore vital to enable meaningful health and physiological assessments in captive, wild or rehabilitated seals and to explore its utility as a marker of conservation relevance in these animals. Point-of-care devices are simple, portable, relatively cheap and use less blood compared with t Continue reading >>

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining The Accuracy Of Your Glucose Meter

Determining the Accuracy of Your Glucose Meter By Gary Gilles | Reviewed by Joel Forman, MD BSIP/UIG/Universal Images Group/Getty Images If you're like most people with diabetes , you probably assume that your glucose meter gives you accurate readings every time you check your blood. You base your insulin dose , food intake, and activity plans off that number. Fortunately, most glucose meters are well designed and give reasonably accurate test results. But there are some things you should know about your glucose meter to help you make the most educated decisions about your diabetes management. If youve ever taken your blood sugar twice or three times in a row without any delay in between tests, youve probably noticed that you dont get the same exact number each time. That doesnt mean your meter isnt operating correctly. It does, though, reflect the variance that is built into each meter. Within the medical community, home blood glucose meters are considered clinically accurate if the result is within 20 percentof what a lab test would indicate. For example, if your glucose meter result was 100 mg/dL, it could vary on the downside to 80 mg/dL or on the upside to 120 mg/dL and still be considered clinically accurate. Your Glucose Meter Measures Blood Differently Than the Lab All blood glucose meters use whole blood to measure glucose . Whole blood is simply a blood sample that contains the red blood cells. In a lab glucose test, only the plasma portion of the blood is used to measure glucose levels; the red blood cells are removed. Whole blood glucose test results are approximately 12 percentlower than the lab plasma results. But there is a way to compare the lab result with your meter. Before you do that, first you need to learn more about your meter. Your Meter Is Cali Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Diagnosis Value Of Glucometer With Laboratory Method In Neonatal Hypoglycaemia

Comparison Of Diagnosis Value Of Glucometer With Laboratory Method In Neonatal Hypoglycaemia

Comparison of Diagnosis Value of Glucometer with Laboratory Method in Neonatal Hypoglycaemia Robabeh Ghergherehchi, Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi & Nazanin Hazhir Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran Background: Neonatal hypoglycaemia is an emergency condition requiring immediate treatment to prevent serious outcomes. Today blood glucose meter is a current methods for detecting blood glucose in health centre of our country. Objective and hypotheses: To determine the accuracy of blood glucose meter in comparison to laboratory method in detecting neonatal hypoglycaemia. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit of Al Zahra Hospital from September 2013 to March 2014. In infants who had risk factors of hypoglycemia blood glucose were tested with blood glucose meter (ACCU CHEK Performa), if the blood glucose was under 60 mg/dl, simultaneously the venous blood glucose values were done on (Selectra2) auto analyzer by glucose oxidase method. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of glucometer were determined. Results: A total of 200-paired samples were taken from 100 neonates. Hypoglycemia was detected in 65 cases (32.5%). Weak correlation was observed between result of glucometer and laboratory method (r=0.275). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy positive predictive value and a negative predictive value of glucometer were 45.45, 74.6, 65, 46.8, and 73.5% respectively in blood glucose <45 mg/dl. Conclusion: According to the results obtained in this study glucometer has not sufficient diagnosis value to detect of neonatal hypoglycaemia. Blood glucose meter results should be confirmed with laboratory method. Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

How accurate is your blood glucose meter? A major study found that almost half of meters do not meet the minimum required standards: For blood sugars over 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 20%. For example, if your blood sugar is 200 mg (11 mmol), the meter must read between 160 (8.8 mmol) and 240 (13.3 mmol) at least 95% of the time. For blood sugars under 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 15 mg. For example, if your blood sugar is 60 mg (3.3 mmol), the meter must read between 45 (2.5 mmol) and 75 (4.2 mmol) at least 95% of the time. There is a new proposal that would require all results to be within 15%. But how do you know if your meter is meeting this standard? Today, there is no systematic verification of meter accuracy after it gets approved for sale. And as you will see below, many meters are sub-standard. This puts people relying on these tools in unnecessary danger. If you’re going to take a shot of insulin, a number that’s 15% off is a really big deal. Taking too much insulin can result in severe low blood sugars, hospitalization and even death. Comparison of Meter Accuracy The chart below is from System Accuracy Evaluation of 43 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose according to DIN EN ISO 15197 by Dr. Guido Freckmann and others published in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2012. Between 2009 and 2011, over a hundred people were recruited to test each of the meters listed below. The test strips were taken from at least seven different vials of one manufacturing lot. Over at least ten days, the patients tested their blood sugar with the meter and then a second sample was taken for analysis in a lab. Before using this data, it is important to know the limitations: The study only looked Continue reading >>

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of one investigational Bayer Blood Glucose meter (with investigational Bayer test strips) and four Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems from other companies. All meter BG results were compared with plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method (YSI Glucose Analyzer). Performance of the five systems was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMSs using capillary blood. All testing and lancing were performed by study staff and some blood samples were glycolyzed to lower the glucose levels. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 146 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Diagnostic Official Title: Evaluation of Blood Glucose Meter Systems - NACT Study Study Start Date : March 2012 Primary Completion Date : March 2012 Study Completion Date : March 2012 Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Study Staff Test BGMSs All testing and lancings were performed by the study staff; subjects did not perform any lancing or self-testing in this study. Study Staff lanced the fingers of subjects and tested the blood samples using five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems(BGMS): FreeStyle Freedom Lite® BGMS; ACCU-CHEK® Aviva BGMS; TRUEtrack® BGMS; OneTouch® Ultra®2 BGMS; CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS. Device: CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS Study staff performed Blood Glucose (BG) testing with capillary fingerstick blood collected from subjects with diabetes and without diabetes (up to 10% of subjects without diabetes were included). Performance of CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMs. All meter BG results were compared with capillary plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method ( Continue reading >>

Comparison Of A Human Portable Glucometer And An Automated Chemistry Analyzer For Measurement Of Blood Glucose Concentration In Pet Ferrets (mustela Putorius Furo).

Comparison Of A Human Portable Glucometer And An Automated Chemistry Analyzer For Measurement Of Blood Glucose Concentration In Pet Ferrets (mustela Putorius Furo).

Type: research-article, Evaluation Studies, Journal Article This study compared blood glucose concentrations measured with a portable blood glucometer and a validated laboratory analyzer in venous blood samples of 20 pet ferrets (Mustela putorius furo). Correlation and agreement were evaluated with a Bland-Altman plot method and Lin's concordance correlation coefficient. Blood glucose concentrations measured with the laboratory analyzer and the glucometer ranged from 1.9 to 8.6 mmol/L and from 0.9 to 9.2 mmol/L, respectively. The glucometer had a poor agreement and correlation with the laboratory analyzer (bias, -0.13 mmol/L; level of agreement, -2.0 to 3.6 mmol/L, concordance correlation coefficient 0.665). The relative sensitivity and specificity of the portable blood glucometer for detection of hypoglycemia were 100% (95% CI: 66% to 100%) and 50% (95% CI: 20% to 80%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 67% (95% CI: 39% to 87%) and 100% (95% CI: 46% to 100%), respectively. Based on these results, clinicians are advised to be cautious when considering the results from this handheld glucometer in pet ferrets, and blood glucose concentrations should be determined with a laboratory analyzer validated for this species. Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

Comparing Glucose Meter Accuracy

One of the most frequent questions we get from our customers who purchase the iHealth Align Portable Glucometer or the iHealth Smart Wireless Glucometer is: How accurate are iHealths meters compared to other glucose meters on the market? Unfortunately, there is not a straightforward answer to this question, as no two meters will give you the same readings and a difference of even 20-30 points may be in the range of error. iHealth glucometers meet the most up-to-date FDA regulations and ISO standards, which state that over-the-counter home-use meters must be accurate within +/-15% compared to a formal lab measurement. This means that a person with a glucose level of 100 can read as low as 85 or as high as 115 and still be within the range of accuracy. According to the FDA and several clinical studies, many factors can determine the accuracy of your meter, including: interfering substances (Vitamin C, Tylenol, etc.) how well you perform the test. For example, you should wash and dry your hands before testing and closely follow the instructions for operating your meter. altitude, temperature, and humidity (High altitude, low and high temperatures, and humidity can cause unpredictable effects on glucose results). Check the meter manual and test strip package insert for more information. store and handle the meter and strips according to manufacturers instructions. It is important to store test strip vials closed and to make sure that you are not using expired strips to check your blood sugar. Rather than comparing meters to other meters to gauge accuracy, the FDA recommends using the three ways below to ensure that your meter is working properly: Continue reading >>

Journal Of Avian Medicine And Surgery

Journal Of Avian Medicine And Surgery

Biochemical analysis is necessary for diagnosis and monitoring of diseases in birds; however, the small volume of blood that can be safely obtained from small avian species often limits laboratory diagnostic testing. Consequently, a suitable methodology requiring only a small volume of blood must be used. This study was designed to compare blood glucose concentrations in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) as measured by a commercial, handheld, human glucometer and a standard autoanalyzer. During the first phase of the study, whole blood samples obtained from 30 domestic pigeons were used to measure the blood glucose concentration with a glucometer, the packed cell volume (PCV), and the total erythrocyte count (nRBC). Plasma separated from the each sample was then used to obtain the plasma glucose concentration with the autoanalyzer. During the second phase of the study, 30 pigeons were assigned to 2 equal groups (n = 15). Hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia was induced in each group by intravenous injection of insulin or glucose, respectively. Blood was collected and processed, and glucose concentrations, PCV, and nRBC were measured as previously described. Linear-regression models demonstrated a significant relationship between results measured by the glucometer and autoanalyzer results from normoglycemic (correlation coefficient [R] = 0.43, P = .02), hypoglycemic (R = 0.95; P < .001), and hyperglycemic (R = 0.81; P < .001) birds. The results of this study suggest that we can predict the real blood-glucose concentration of pigeons by using results obtained by a glucometer. Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Capillary And Venous Blood Glucose Levels Using Glucometer And Laboratory Blood Glucose Level In Poisoned Patients Being In Coma.

Comparison Of Capillary And Venous Blood Glucose Levels Using Glucometer And Laboratory Blood Glucose Level In Poisoned Patients Being In Coma.

Poisoning is one of the most common medical presentations in a hospital. Hypoglycemic patients are at increased risk of toxicity. The purpose of this study was to compare capillary blood glucose and venous blood glucose measurements using glucometer against laboratory blood glucose in case of poisoned patients being in coma.During the 6-month study period, a random sample of 98 patients was admitted in the Department of Poisoning Emergency and Clinical Toxicology of Noor Hospital, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran from May 2010. Data collected included age, gender, poisoning reason, vital signs, and Glasgow Coma Scale. Capillary blood samples were obtained from the fourth fingertip of the non-dominant hand. t-Test, paired t-test, Pearson's correlation analysis, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for analysis.The mean of capillary blood glucose was 115.7 50.2, of venous blood glucose measured by glucose meter was 117.8 47.3, and of glucose measured in vitro was 115.8 55.1. Mean of blood glucose showed no significant difference with the three mentioned methods. The correlation between capillary and intravenous blood glucose samples measured by glucometer was 0.93, between capillary blood glucose and in vitro measured venous blood glucose was 0.78, and between venous blood glucose measured by glucose meter and in vitro measured sample was 0.81. The mean of capillary and venous blood glucose levels measured by glucose meter, capillary and venous blood glucose levels measured in vitro, and venous blood glucose levels measured by glucose meter had no significant differences.Using venous blood sample and measuring the glucose level in it by glucometer is an acceptable and advisable method, and capillary blood glucose measurement by using glucometer Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

Choosing A Blood Glucose Meter | Accu-chek

Choosing A Blood Glucose Meter | Accu-chek

There are many blood sugar meters to choose from, so start by thinking about what's most important to you. Ask yourself a few questions. Are you concerned about accuracy? Make sure you're using a meter and test strips that provide accurate results. Roche quality control processes ensure consistent accuracy. Find out more about our accuracy commitment . Do you use blood glucose results to dose insulin? The Accu-Chek Guide meter sends results directly to a smartphone app that includes an insulin calculator.1 Do you feel like you're always short on time? A system that syncs your data wirelessly, without manually entering results, can save time with every test. You may also want to consider a blood glucose meter that gives results quickly, makes it easier to handle test strips, doesn't require coding, or simplifies lancing or dosing. Would you like to reduce the pain of testing? Choose a system with a lancing device specifically designed for comfort, such as the Accu-Chek FastClix lancing device . Precision-guided technology minimizes the lancet's painful side to side motion and thin-gauge, bevel-cut lancets help ensure smoother entry. Plus, 11 customizable depth settings make it easier to get the right amount of blood the first time. Will you track results in the blood sugar meter, with an app or on a computer? Most blood sugar monitors have built-in memories, and many can beam or transfer data directly to your smartphone or computer. The Accu-Chek product family includes a few of these options, including the mySugr , Accu-Chek Connect , and Glooko apps. Think about what will make testing easier for you, then look for a system that fits your needs. 1The Bolus Advisor feature requires setup and activation by a healthcare professional. Continue reading >>

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

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