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Glucometer Chart

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

2016 Blood Glucose Meter Comparisons

Choose Your Blood Glucose Meter Wisely! These days, there is lots of emphasis on accuracy, particularly when it comes to continuous glucose monitors (and their ability to match blood glucose values) and insulin pumps (and their ability to deliver doses with extreme precision). But let’s not forget about that trusty, dusty blood glucose meter that has been a staple of diabetes management. Why is meter accuracy so important? For those who take rapid-acting insulin to cover meals and “correct” out-of-range blood sugar readings, accurate readings are necessary for determining the right dose. Inaccurate readings can lead to over- or under-dosing, which can produce dangerously high or low blood sugar results. An inaccurate meter can also cause a person to treat hypoglycemia inappropriately (if the meter reads too low) or miss the need for treatment (if the meter reads too high). And finally, with so many people using CGM systems, proper calibration is a must. The more accurate the fingerstick readings, the better the CGM will perform. Of course, no meter will provide accurate results if the user fails to use proper technique. That means: Making sure the finger (or other test area) is clean Using the test strips prior to their expiration date Keep the strips sealed in their bottle to prevent exposure to light and humidity Applying enough blood to fill the test strip completely. Never exposing the strips to extreme hot or cold temperatures. Coding the meter (if required) Our team believes that meters should be within 10% of lab values to be considered accurate. One of the more important things you can do to ensure accurate results is to choose the right meter. Blood glucose meters vary widely in terms of accuracy. Accuracy is determined by comparing measurements obtained Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Converter

Blood Sugar Converter

Tweet Convert blood sugar/glucose from mmol/L (UK standard) to mg/dL (US standard) and vice versa using our blood sugar converter. Whats the difference between mmol/L and mg/dL? Both sets of units are used to measure blood sugar levels and both give a measurement of the concentration of glucose in the blood, albeit in slightly different ways. mmol/L gives the molarity, which is the number of molecules of a substance within a specified volume, in this case within 1 litre. mg/dL gives the concentration by the ratio of weight to volume, in this case milligrams per decilitre. mmol/L is the most common measurement used in the UK with mg/dL predominantly used in the USA and continental Europe. Blood glucose typically varies from 4 mmol/L to 6 mmol/L for people without diabetes. Blood sugar (also called blood glucose) needs to be tightly controlled in the human body to minimise the risk of complications developing. Formula to calculate mmol/l from mg/dl: mmol/l = mg/dl / 18 Formula to calculate mg/dl from mmol/l: mg/dl = 18 × mmol/l Can I change the units given by my blood glucose meter? This can depend on which blood glucose meter you have. Some meters allow you to change the units from mg/dL to mmol/L and vice versa whether some meters are only set up to display one set of units. Check the meter’s manual for whether it is possible to change the units. If you don’t have or cannot find the manual, contact the manufacturer. Why are blood sugar levels important? Measuring blood sugar levels and understanding what your glucose levels should be is an essential part of diabetes treatment for many people with diabetes. Blood sugar level refers to the total amount of glucose circulating in the blood. In different parts of the world, different units for measuring blood glucose ar Continue reading >>

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Discuss blood glucose (sugar) targets with your healthcare team when creating your diabetes management plan. People who have diabetes should be testing their blood glucose regularly at home. Regular blood glucose testing helps you determine how well your diabetes management program of meal planning, exercising and medication (if necessary) is doing to keep your blood glucose as close to normal as possible. The results of the nationwide Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) show that the closer you keep your blood glucose to normal, the more likely you are to prevent diabetes complications such as eye disease, nerve damage, and other problems. For some people, other medical conditions, age, or other issues may cause your physician to establish somewhat higher blood glucose targets for you. The following chart outlines the usual blood glucose ranges for a person who does and does not have diabetes. Use this as a guide to work with your physician and your healthcare team to determine what your target goals should be, and to develop a program of regular blood glucose monitoring to manage your condition. Time of Check Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people without diabetes Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people with diabetes Before breakfast (fasting) < 100 70 - 130 Before lunch, supper and snack < 110 70 - 130 Two hours after meals < 140 < 180 Bedtime < 120 90- 150 A1C (also called glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin A1c) < 6% < 7% < = less than > = greater than > = greater than or equal to < = less than or equal to Information obtained from Joslin Diabetes Center's Guidelines for Pharmacological Management of Type 2 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing your blood glucose, also known as Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), is a method of checking how much glucose (sugar) is in the blood using a glucose meter -- anywhere, anytime. Here, you'll learn some basics about: Blood sugar targets for adults How your doctor tests your blood The importance of self-testing When to test and what to look for How to share results with your doctor Blood glucose targets for non-pregnant adults* Before meal After meal 80-120 mg/dL Less than 180 mg/dL How your doctor tests your blood -- the A1C test† Your doctor uses what is called an A1C (Glycosylated Hemoglobin) test to see what your average blood glucose level has been over the last two to three months. Used for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, it gives you and your doctor an indication on how well you are responding to your treatment regimen, and if any adjustments are necessary. The goal is to keep your level below seven percent (7%).* The A1C test is sometimes referred to as the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The connection between A1C and average blood sugar levels.† Your A1C test result will not show the daily effects of food choices and your activity. A blood glucose meter is the best way to observe and track the immediate effects of food choices and activity on your blood glucose levels. This allows you to take immediate action to bring your glucose levels within range if needed. Your doctor will also rely upon your blood glucose meter results to assess and adjust your treatment regimen. When to test and what to look for – a practical guide Use this simple chart to remind you when to test and what to observe to help you manage your blood glucose level on a daily basis. When to test What to look for First thing in the morning, before you eat How Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

How accurate is your blood glucose meter? A major study found that almost half of meters do not meet the minimum required standards: For blood sugars over 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 20%. For example, if your blood sugar is 200 mg (11 mmol), the meter must read between 160 (8.8 mmol) and 240 (13.3 mmol) at least 95% of the time. For blood sugars under 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 15 mg. For example, if your blood sugar is 60 mg (3.3 mmol), the meter must read between 45 (2.5 mmol) and 75 (4.2 mmol) at least 95% of the time. There is a new proposal that would require all results to be within 15%. But how do you know if your meter is meeting this standard? Today, there is no systematic verification of meter accuracy after it gets approved for sale. And as you will see below, many meters are sub-standard. This puts people relying on these tools in unnecessary danger. If you’re going to take a shot of insulin, a number that’s 15% off is a really big deal. Taking too much insulin can result in severe low blood sugars, hospitalization and even death. Comparison of Meter Accuracy The chart below is from System Accuracy Evaluation of 43 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose according to DIN EN ISO 15197 by Dr. Guido Freckmann and others published in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2012. Between 2009 and 2011, over a hundred people were recruited to test each of the meters listed below. The test strips were taken from at least seven different vials of one manufacturing lot. Over at least ten days, the patients tested their blood sugar with the meter and then a second sample was taken for analysis in a lab. Before using this data, it is important to know the limitations: The study only looked Continue reading >>

Self-monitoring Blood Glucose | Accu-chek

Self-monitoring Blood Glucose | Accu-chek

In general, the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommended blood sugar levels are: Your range is yours alonebased on your health, age, level of activity and other factors. And remember that your target is a range you'd like to stay within, not a single number. But what if you're out of range? These results provide valuable information, too. You can review your numbers over time to find patterns in highs and lows. Then you can work with your healthcare team to make adjustments to your diabetes management plan that will bring you closer to your target range. Day-to-day blood sugar checksalso known as routine testingcan give you a good idea of how you're doing at this moment, and they can be reviewed overall to see trends. They can help answer questions such as: Are your medications working as they should? How does the type or amount of food you eat affect your blood sugar? How does activity or stress affect your blood sugar? Your healthcare team will probably recommend a schedule of routine or daily testing to help you manage your blood sugar. Recognizing patterns with structured testing You can take self-monitoring a step further with structured testing checking your blood sugar at specific times over a short period to see how the things you do may affect your blood sugar. For example, if you're interested in insights into your overall blood glucose control, you can identify patterns with the Accu-Chek 360 View tool . If you'd like to look at one thing, such as a specific meal or activity, try before-and-after testing using the Accu-Chek Testing in Pairs tool . Print one out and take the completed tool to your next appointment. You and your healthcare professional can use the results to fine-tune your diabetes management. 1Polonsky, WH. Diabetes Burnout: What to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Health Annual Product Reference Charts

Diabetes Health Annual Product Reference Charts

The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images, and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. Opinions expressed here are the opinions of writers, contributors, and commentators, and are not necessarily those of Diabetes Health. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment because of something you have read on or accessed through this website. I think that it’s safe to say that none of us were happy when we first found out that we had diabetes. The words “you’re a diabetic” or “you have diabetes” can sound like a death sentence and while we … Dear Nadia, Is marijuana used to lower high blood sugar? if so, does this mean I have to refrain from the munchies to get the benefits? Leah Dear Leah: The new Marijuana industry is still at its infancy in terms … Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Adults With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Adults With Diabetes

Each time you test your blood sugar, log it in a notebook or online tool or with an app. Note the date, time, results, and any recent activities: What medication and dosage you took What you ate How much and what kind of exercise you were doing That will help you and your doctor see how your treatment is working. Well-managed diabetes can delay or prevent complications that affect your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes doubles your risk for heart disease and stroke, too. Fortunately, controlling your blood sugar will also make these problems less likely. Tight blood sugar control, however, means a greater chance of low blood sugar levels, so your doctor may suggest higher targets. Continue reading >>

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